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Candace
February 11th 06, 05:51 PM
My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
doxycycline, polyflex discontinued. He has been hospitalized for a
week today, on IV fluids and tube feedings. His temp goes up and down.
All bloodwork and x-rays normal except for elevated white count. He's
miserable in his cage, obviously. We want him home. Last night he ate
on his own so he didn't have to be tube fed this a.m., but his temp is
still 104. If I knew he would eat at home on his own, we would bring
him home.

The thing is this, his bill is now over $2,000 and nothing has changed.
We're a little worried about the money. Obviously, if we knew there
was an end in sight, we would pay willingly but this could drag on
forever and nothing might change. I am very tempted to bring him home
with antibiotics and an appetite stimulant and will be discusing this
with the vet later today when we go to see Scottie. But I've been
scouring the internet and I sometimes see where people write, "the vet
gave my cat a fever reducer and some antibiotics and sent him home."
But no one says what the fever reducer is.

I know aspirin has to be used very sparingly in a cat and I already
mentioned that to my vet and he didn't seem to favor that idea. I also
mentioned steroids and he wasn't thrilled with that either because it
can suppress the immune system. But would a short course of steroids
hurt anything? And is there something else that might be considered a
fever reducer?

I know Scottie is terrified there, he spends most of his time hiding
under a blanket unless I come to see him. I'm sure he's sick of being
poked and prodded. If we don't bring him home today, we are definitely
going to have to do so on Monday. I know if he would eat here, he
would be better off here but I can't guarantee he will eat. They
couldn't successfully syringe feed him so they have to tube feed him.
It's not a permanent tube, they just put the tubing partially down his
throat and connect it to the syringe. Is that something I could be
taught to do?

Can anyone help me?

Candace

cybercat
February 11th 06, 06:19 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
> antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
> doxycycline, polyflex discontinued.


Candace--I found three articles, did not read them. I hope they help. (FWIW,
I would bring him home.)

http://tinyurl.com/deqw2

cybercat
February 11th 06, 06:22 PM
Candace, from a quick Google search it looks like aspirin will do it.

Can you ask your vet?

cybercat
February 11th 06, 06:33 PM
> Can anyone help me?
>

Candace, sorry, I re-read your post and see that you will be asking the vet.

The only thing I could think of is this: I wonder if you could physically
cool his body, like my mother did when I had high fevers, with cool
compresses? No doubt he would hate it, but it worked on me.

I am sorry I cannot be more helpful I know how frantic you must be. Maybe
Phil could help. Maybe email him to get his attention?

JJ
February 11th 06, 07:43 PM
I wonder if the stress is exacerbating whatever is wrong? Causing temp
to spike and reduction in appetite. Maybe you should try him at home,
I would probably consider this if it were one of my cats.

Is it possible your cat had any kind of poisening? Did blood work
include toxicity tests? Lastly, could kitty have something viral that
antibiotics are not helping thus the reason for the continuing temp?
Are there any neurological symptoms?

As far as appetite goes I would ask your Veterinarian about the use of
Reglan (spelling?) it reduces nausea and perhaps the antibiotics &
stress are part of the appetite loss....I agree that if you can get him
eating perhaps things will start looking up...

Are they giving him any sedatives at the Veterinary office to "take the
edge off" Perhaps there are barking dogs and unfamiliar sounds and
smells and these could be startling and frightening your cat, I wonder
if sedatives (mild) would be allowed for him given his current status
and stress? Maybe they could add something to his IV?

If you decide to leave kitty at the Vet, can they put kitty in a quiet
area? Make sure cage is high up - not towards the bottom - cats feel
safer when they are up higher.

If you leave him there bring him some blankets and things from home
with your scent on it - maybe even bring his feeding dishes from home
and food. Another thing to try to get kitty to eat is using pureed
baby food - you can syringe this, they have high salt content but some
cats will eat this when all else fails. Also if you take kitty home
ask for some cans of AD and SD.

How old is kitty?
Is kitty vaccinated for everything including Leukemia?
Is kitty from a multicat household and if so, has your Veterinarian
discussed FIP with you?
What kind of Xrays were done? Of this throat/nasal area? Could
anything be caught in his throat/sinus/nasal area?
Does kitty have any dental issues?

It probably would not hurt to get a second opinion from a Veterinarian,
preferably one from a different clinic. Hope things settle soon. Jen

Rhonda
February 11th 06, 07:54 PM
Hi Candace,

You might want to take a look at this article and see if everything has
been covered:

http://www.petplace.com/cats/fever-in-cats/page1.aspx

Here is what it said for home care:
----------------------------
For mild fevers, less than 104.5F, monitoring your pet at home may
result in spontaneous recovery. Make sure your pet continues to eat and
drink. Take your pet's temperature one to two times daily. If the
temperature rises above 104.5F, this should prompt you to contact your
veterinarian.

Also, look for any areas of infection such as abscesses, skin lumps,
blood in urine or straining to urinate, sneezing or breathing
difficulty. In addition, lack of appetite or lethargy should prompt an
examination and treatment by your veterinarian.
----------------------------

Candace, have they tried different antibiotics? If he does have an
infection, it sounds like the antibiotic is not reaching it or is not
the right one. Too bad they can't tell where it's coming from and do a
culture and sensitivity test.

Have they thoroughly checked his teeth? Abscesses and infections in the
mouth can sometimes cause mystery illnesses. Our cat went through that.

Good luck. If he's eating (or you can force him to eat,) I would be
tempted to bring him home for awhile. Is the vet an internist? We got a
referral from our regular vet to an internist when things got bad with Bob.

Let us know how he's doing,

Rhonda



Candace wrote:

> My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
> antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
> doxycycline, polyflex discontinued. He has been hospitalized for a
> week today, on IV fluids and tube feedings. His temp goes up and down.
> All bloodwork and x-rays normal except for elevated white count. He's
> miserable in his cage, obviously. We want him home. Last night he ate
> on his own so he didn't have to be tube fed this a.m., but his temp is
> still 104. If I knew he would eat at home on his own, we would bring
> him home.

Arubalisa
February 11th 06, 07:54 PM
Excellent article on fevers in cats (from article appeared in Cornell
University's Cat Watch Magazine)
....http://www.judithstock.com/Speaking_of_Animals/Fever_in_Cats/fever_in_cats.html

The article suggests for home treatment, "wetting down the pads of the
feet and tail". I have also read elsewhere that rubbing alcohol could
be used on the paw pads.

"We rarely use aspirin for fever," said Dr. Guglielmino. "Aspirin can
be used with close veterinarian supervision but we use it for chronic
arthritis pain and heart disease to help prevent blood clots."

"Aspirin is typically metabolized slowly in a cats system; therefore,
it's used in low doses. In addition, a cat dosage is a small fraction
of the human dosage. According to Guglielmino, most veterinarians do
not try to lower fever with anti-pyretic medication (Aspirin) but
instead try to identify the cause of the fever and specifically treat
the cause instead of treating the symptom.

"Cats do not have elucuronyl transferas, a liver enzymes needed to
break down human medications and can't convert acetaminophen to
non-toxic byproducts," stated Guglielmino. "Acetaminophen is Tylenol
- never use on a cat, it will kill them. Cats cannot tolerate other
non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Ibuprofen." "

Lisa
http://www.hoosierkitties.com Hoosier Kitties

Phil P.
February 11th 06, 08:22 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
> antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
> doxycycline, polyflex discontinued. He has been hospitalized for a
> week today, on IV fluids and tube feedings. His temp goes up and down.
> All bloodwork and x-rays normal except for elevated white count. He's
> miserable in his cage, obviously. We want him home. Last night he ate
> on his own so he didn't have to be tube fed this a.m., but his temp is
> still 104. If I knew he would eat at home on his own, we would bring
> him home.
>
> The thing is this, his bill is now over $2,000 and nothing has changed.
> We're a little worried about the money. Obviously, if we knew there
> was an end in sight, we would pay willingly but this could drag on
> forever and nothing might change. I am very tempted to bring him home
> with antibiotics and an appetite stimulant and will be discusing this
> with the vet later today when we go to see Scottie. But I've been
> scouring the internet and I sometimes see where people write, "the vet
> gave my cat a fever reducer and some antibiotics and sent him home."
> But no one says what the fever reducer is.
>
> I know aspirin has to be used very sparingly in a cat and I already
> mentioned that to my vet and he didn't seem to favor that idea. I also
> mentioned steroids and he wasn't thrilled with that either because it
> can suppress the immune system. But would a short course of steroids
> hurt anything? And is there something else that might be considered a
> fever reducer?
>
> I know Scottie is terrified there, he spends most of his time hiding
> under a blanket unless I come to see him. I'm sure he's sick of being
> poked and prodded. If we don't bring him home today, we are definitely
> going to have to do so on Monday. I know if he would eat here, he
> would be better off here but I can't guarantee he will eat. They
> couldn't successfully syringe feed him so they have to tube feed him.
> It's not a permanent tube, they just put the tubing partially down his
> throat and connect it to the syringe. Is that something I could be
> taught to do?
>
> Can anyone help me?
>


Candace,

Did the vet check Scottie's mouth thoroughly? Fever and elevated WBC could
be the result of oral inflammation/infection- which could also affect his
eating. You might want to opt for dental x-rays.

Also, you might want to ask your vet to send a sample of Scottie's blood to
a diagnostic lab for PCR (polymerase chain reaction) testing, smear and
culture to
look for bacteria, fungi, and viruses in the blood. Is there any chance he
might have been bitten by a poisonous insect or arachnid? If so, that
should be noted on the blood sample.

I know how you feel about him being at the vet's- but that's probably the
best place for him until he stabilized. I don't think you should bring
Scottie home until you are sure he's not contagious.

Keep the faith.

Phil

February 11th 06, 10:23 PM
Candace wrote:
> My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
> antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
> doxycycline, polyflex discontinued. He has been hospitalized for a
> week today, on IV fluids and tube feedings. His temp goes up and down.
> All bloodwork and x-rays normal except for elevated white count. He's
> miserable in his cage, obviously. We want him home. Last night he ate
> on his own so he didn't have to be tube fed this a.m., but his temp is
> still 104. If I knew he would eat at home on his own, we would bring
> him home.
>
> The thing is this, his bill is now over $2,000 and nothing has changed.
> We're a little worried about the money. Obviously, if we knew there
> was an end in sight, we would pay willingly but this could drag on
> forever and nothing might change. I am very tempted to bring him home
> with antibiotics and an appetite stimulant and will be discusing this
> with the vet later today when we go to see Scottie. But I've been
> scouring the internet and I sometimes see where people write, "the vet
> gave my cat a fever reducer and some antibiotics and sent him home."
> But no one says what the fever reducer is.
>
> I know aspirin has to be used very sparingly in a cat and I already
> mentioned that to my vet and he didn't seem to favor that idea. I also
> mentioned steroids and he wasn't thrilled with that either because it
> can suppress the immune system. But would a short course of steroids
> hurt anything? And is there something else that might be considered a
> fever reducer?
>
> I know Scottie is terrified there, he spends most of his time hiding
> under a blanket unless I come to see him. I'm sure he's sick of being
> poked and prodded. If we don't bring him home today, we are definitely
> going to have to do so on Monday. I know if he would eat here, he
> would be better off here but I can't guarantee he will eat. They
> couldn't successfully syringe feed him so they have to tube feed him.
> It's not a permanent tube, they just put the tubing partially down his
> throat and connect it to the syringe. Is that something I could be
> taught to do?
>

I am surprised they are doing that without sedation, actually. It's
not someting I would want to do at home. I would be more inclined to
try to syringe feed him only by mouth.

As for fever reducers, I don't know if a medication other than aspirin,
but we used cold packs made from rubber gloves filled with water and
wrapped in towels - just chill them in the fridge, and wrap them in a
towel, and place them on his feet and under his chin.

The elevated count and fever suggest infection somewhere - I am
wondering if it isn't in the intestines/bowel since you said before he
wasn't pooping much (IIRC). Have they tried antifungal meds? At this
point I would be thinking it is something other than a bacterial
infection.

Good luck and keep us posted.
-L.

Candace
February 12th 06, 12:04 AM
I probably shouldn't have brought him home but he's home. I knew I
would second guess either decision I made but I thought he would be
better off here. He came home all perky and happy and inspected
everything and purred and looked good. But, it's only been a couple
hours and he looks worse already. I think he has a sore throat from
the tube being shoved down his throat so much. I noticed a couple days
ago that he swallows hard, like it hurts. Well, he's doing that no, a
lot. He ate some treats, promptly barfed them up. Ate some a/d,
barfed a bunch of fluid up and that's after I had given him an oral
reglan. He hadn't been barfing at the vet but he was also on IV reglan
there. I just think it's because his throat hurts, though, and not
that he's actually nauseated. But, if he can't eat, he would have to go
back and have the tube again, and then the vicious cycle would
continue. What can you do for a cat's sore throat? Cetacaine?
Probably not. The vet is closed now and he won't be back 'til Monday.

I read all your responses. He does have some gingivitis but the vet
said his mouth could not be the cause for all this. Yes, he may have
something fungal. Cocci is the only one he was tested for. No, he's
not on any anti-fungals. I honestly don't know if we can afford to
take him to specialists at this point. We have spent $2,300 since Feb.
2 and that kind of is depleting my emergency funds. We haven't even
paid off all of Abbey's bills from last spring. Almost but not quite.
I hate that it has to come down to money for an animal sometimes. It's
different when it's a human and they have insurance or even if they
don't, they can still get some mediocre medical care. With pets, it's
all about the cash.

I just don't know what to do. He has to eat but I don't think he can.
I have oxazepam and cyproheptadine for appetite stimulant. The vet
said to use either altho he prefers the oxazepam. Maybe I should just
wait until tomorrow to try to get to him to eat. He as tube fed today
and ate on his own last night so he can go until tomorrow without
eating. Maybe his throat will feel a little better by then and he
would be able to eat? Is it common for a cat's thraot hurt to hurt
after 7 days of tube feedings? I would think it's a logical assumption
but what can be done for this?

I truly hope he isn't infectious to our other cats but our theory was
that he was here for 3.5 days sick before being hospitalized and so
far, they are fine, and that was a week ago.

Someone mentioned FIP. Yes, that was discussed briefly. He is
positive for the corona virus (as are most cats, I know) but his titers
were not very high so it wasn't really indicated, I guess. A
possibility but not one the vet apparently feels is a strong one. My
other cats are also positive for corona virus.

Any sore throat suggestions?

Candace

PawsForThought
February 12th 06, 02:03 AM
Candace wrote:
Maybe his throat will feel a little better by then and he
> would be able to eat? Is it common for a cat's thraot hurt to hurt
> after 7 days of tube feedings? I would think it's a logical assumption
> but what can be done for this?

I would think his throat is probably pretty tender, but I don't think
there's anything much you can do. Give him some water is all I can
think of. I would let him rest as much as possible. Poor guy :( I
hope he feels better soon, Candace. Maybe a good night's rest for the
both of you is in order.

Take care,
Lauren

Candace
February 12th 06, 02:25 AM
PawsForThought wrote:
>
> I would think his throat is probably pretty tender, but I don't think
> there's anything much you can do. Give him some water is all I can
> think of. I would let him rest as much as possible. Poor guy :( I
> hope he feels better soon, Candace. Maybe a good night's rest for the
> both of you is in order.
>
> Take care,
> Lauren

He's vomited several times, clear or yellow mucus, and a lot of it. I
called the vet. He said it wouldn't be from the tube. He can't think
what it could be unless I bring him in to be evaluated. I mentioned
euthanasia, I can't bear to see him suffering and retching. He said he
would do whatever I wanted, whenever, to call him anytime. I won't do
anything until tomorrow, I'll see how he does, maybe it will pass. The
vet is stumped as he didn't do anything like this while he was
hospitalized and, yet, it started about an hour after he got home.

I'm googling and I just can't find what the cause of vomiting mucus is.

I don't think I can give him his pills tonight, I guess I won't even
try and see what tomorrow brings.

I really think he may not be long for this world.

Candace

Candace
February 12th 06, 02:28 AM
Candace wrote:

> He's vomited several times, clear or yellow mucus, and a lot of it. I
> called the vet. He said it wouldn't be from the tube. He can't think
> what it could be unless I bring him in to be evaluated. I mentioned
> euthanasia, I can't bear to see him suffering and retching. He said he
> would do whatever I wanted, whenever, to call him anytime. I won't do
> anything until tomorrow, I'll see how he does, maybe it will pass. The
> vet is stumped as he didn't do anything like this while he was
> hospitalized and, yet, it started about an hour after he got home.
>
> I'm googling and I just can't find what the cause of vomiting mucus is.
>
> I don't think I can give him his pills tonight, I guess I won't even
> try and see what tomorrow brings.
>
> I really think he may not be long for this world.
>
> Candace

I meant to change the subject line when I wrote the last post. Sorry.

cybercat
February 12th 06, 02:38 AM
"Candace" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> I really think he may not be long for this world.
>

Oh Candace.

February 12th 06, 03:07 AM
Candace wrote:
> I probably shouldn't have brought him home but he's home. I knew I
> would second guess either decision I made but I thought he would be
> better off here. He came home all perky and happy and inspected
> everything and purred and looked good. But, it's only been a couple
> hours and he looks worse already. I think he has a sore throat from
> the tube being shoved down his throat so much. I noticed a couple days
> ago that he swallows hard, like it hurts. Well, he's doing that no, a
> lot. He ate some treats, promptly barfed them up. Ate some a/d,
> barfed a bunch of fluid up and that's after I had given him an oral
> reglan. He hadn't been barfing at the vet but he was also on IV reglan
> there. I just think it's because his throat hurts, though, and not
> that he's actually nauseated. But, if he can't eat, he would have to go
> back and have the tube again, and then the vicious cycle would
> continue. What can you do for a cat's sore throat? Cetacaine?
> Probably not. The vet is closed now and he won't be back 'til Monday.
>
> I read all your responses. He does have some gingivitis but the vet
> said his mouth could not be the cause for all this. Yes, he may have
> something fungal. Cocci is the only one he was tested for. No, he's
> not on any anti-fungals. I honestly don't know if we can afford to
> take him to specialists at this point. We have spent $2,300 since Feb.
> 2 and that kind of is depleting my emergency funds. We haven't even
> paid off all of Abbey's bills from last spring. Almost but not quite.
> I hate that it has to come down to money for an animal sometimes. It's
> different when it's a human and they have insurance or even if they
> don't, they can still get some mediocre medical care. With pets, it's
> all about the cash.
>
> I just don't know what to do. He has to eat but I don't think he can.
> I have oxazepam and cyproheptadine for appetite stimulant. The vet
> said to use either altho he prefers the oxazepam. Maybe I should just
> wait until tomorrow to try to get to him to eat. He as tube fed today
> and ate on his own last night so he can go until tomorrow without
> eating. Maybe his throat will feel a little better by then and he
> would be able to eat? Is it common for a cat's thraot hurt to hurt
> after 7 days of tube feedings? I would think it's a logical assumption
> but what can be done for this?
>
> I truly hope he isn't infectious to our other cats but our theory was
> that he was here for 3.5 days sick before being hospitalized and so
> far, they are fine, and that was a week ago.
>
> Someone mentioned FIP. Yes, that was discussed briefly. He is
> positive for the corona virus (as are most cats, I know) but his titers
> were not very high so it wasn't really indicated, I guess. A
> possibility but not one the vet apparently feels is a strong one. My
> other cats are also positive for corona virus.

I would expect him to be a lot more sick and possibly have fluid in his
abdomen at this point, if it were FIP.

>
> Any sore throat suggestions?

Time and love and water is about all you can do. I get the gut feeling
that he has an infection in his intestine or bowel somewhere. I know
you said he pooped at the vet with assistance, but the description
before that worried me and still does. Did they do any X-ray with
contrast to see if he was blocked?

Keep us posted as you can.
hugs,
-L.

February 12th 06, 03:12 AM
Candace wrote:
>
> He's vomited several times, clear or yellow mucus, and a lot of it. I
> called the vet. He said it wouldn't be from the tube. He can't think
> what it could be unless I bring him in to be evaluated. I mentioned
> euthanasia, I can't bear to see him suffering and retching. He said he
> would do whatever I wanted, whenever, to call him anytime. I won't do
> anything until tomorrow, I'll see how he does, maybe it will pass. The
> vet is stumped as he didn't do anything like this while he was
> hospitalized and, yet, it started about an hour after he got home.
>
> I'm googling and I just can't find what the cause of vomiting mucus is.
>
> I don't think I can give him his pills tonight, I guess I won't even
> try and see what tomorrow brings.
>
> I really think he may not be long for this world.
>
> Candace

This is a long shot but I wonder if he has a linear foreign body -
string, thread or similar in his GI tract/intestines. It causes
vomiting mucous- often times colored. Might mention it to the vet.
Let us know how he does.

If you decide to euthanize him, don't beat yourself up because of lack
of money. There is a limit for most people and despite what some of
the assholes here have said in the past, that doesn't mean you love him
any less.

Hang in there,

-L.

Patty Jo
February 12th 06, 03:37 AM
Candace, I too am worried about the possibility of him having ingested
string or something. The only way to tell is to ex-ray those intestines
& see if they're balled up in there. If that were the case, that may
have cut through his intestines causing a massive infection. That's what
happened to my Becky & she also vomited yellow mucus. Unfortnately, not
realizing what was wrong soon enough too much damage was done & even
surgery couldn't save her. I hope that's not the case but it's well
worth checking.
Sending healing thoughts your way, Patty Jo.

Candace
February 12th 06, 04:16 AM
Patty Jo wrote:
> Candace, I too am worried about the possibility of him having ingested
> string or something. The only way to tell is to ex-ray those intestines
> & see if they're balled up in there. If that were the case, that may
> have cut through his intestines causing a massive infection. That's what
> happened to my Becky & she also vomited yellow mucus. Unfortnately, not
> realizing what was wrong soon enough too much damage was done & even
> surgery couldn't save her. I hope that's not the case but it's well
> worth checking.
> Sending healing thoughts your way, Patty Jo.

They did x-rays but not with contrast of his abdomen. Would it show if
contrast wasn't used? Lyn? Why would he not have barfed at the vet in
the last week? Would the reglan IV have suppressed the urge?

I just assumed he didn't poop because he was so terrified. He is a
former feral and was very horrified the whole time at the vet, hiding
under his blankies whenever possible. He didn't pee for several days
either and they wound up cathing him to see if he was blocked. He
wasn't and then he peed normally after that...well, like once a day. I
think he was so scared there he just couldn't perform any bodily
functions. But I don't know about this mucus development...

Candace

mlbriggs
February 12th 06, 06:27 AM
On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 16:04:18 -0800, Candace wrote:

> I probably shouldn't have brought him home but he's home. I knew I
> would second guess either decision I made but I thought he would be
> better off here. He came home all perky and happy and inspected
> everything and purred and looked good. But, it's only been a couple
> hours and he looks worse already. I think he has a sore throat from
> the tube being shoved down his throat so much. I noticed a couple days
> ago that he swallows hard, like it hurts. Well, he's doing that no, a
> lot. He ate some treats, promptly barfed them up. Ate some a/d,
> barfed a bunch of fluid up and that's after I had given him an oral
> reglan. He hadn't been barfing at the vet but he was also on IV reglan
> there. I just think it's because his throat hurts, though, and not
> that he's actually nauseated. But, if he can't eat, he would have to go
> back and have the tube again, and then the vicious cycle would
> continue. What can you do for a cat's sore throat? Cetacaine?
> Probably not. The vet is closed now and he won't be back 'til Monday.
>
> I read all your responses. He does have some gingivitis but the vet
> said his mouth could not be the cause for all this. Yes, he may have
> something fungal. Cocci is the only one he was tested for. No, he's
> not on any anti-fungals. I honestly don't know if we can afford to
> take him to specialists at this point. We have spent $2,300 since Feb.
> 2 and that kind of is depleting my emergency funds. We haven't even
> paid off all of Abbey's bills from last spring. Almost but not quite.
> I hate that it has to come down to money for an animal sometimes. It's
> different when it's a human and they have insurance or even if they
> don't, they can still get some mediocre medical care. With pets, it's
> all about the cash.
>
> I just don't know what to do. He has to eat but I don't think he can.
> I have oxazepam and cyproheptadine for appetite stimulant. The vet
> said to use either altho he prefers the oxazepam. Maybe I should just
> wait until tomorrow to try to get to him to eat. He as tube fed today
> and ate on his own last night so he can go until tomorrow without
> eating. Maybe his throat will feel a little better by then and he
> would be able to eat? Is it common for a cat's thraot hurt to hurt
> after 7 days of tube feedings? I would think it's a logical assumption
> but what can be done for this?
>
> I truly hope he isn't infectious to our other cats but our theory was
> that he was here for 3.5 days sick before being hospitalized and so
> far, they are fine, and that was a week ago.
>
> Someone mentioned FIP. Yes, that was discussed briefly. He is
> positive for the corona virus (as are most cats, I know) but his titers
> were not very high so it wasn't really indicated, I guess. A
> possibility but not one the vet apparently feels is a strong one. My
> other cats are also positive for corona virus.
>
> Any sore throat suggestions?
>
> Candace


If he was "perky and happy" when you brought him home could there be
something in your house making him sick? This may be off the wall, but do
you have a carbon monoxide detector?

-L.
February 12th 06, 06:28 AM
Candace wrote:
> Patty Jo wrote:
> > Candace, I too am worried about the possibility of him having ingested
> > string or something. The only way to tell is to ex-ray those intestines
> > & see if they're balled up in there. If that were the case, that may
> > have cut through his intestines causing a massive infection. That's what
> > happened to my Becky & she also vomited yellow mucus. Unfortnately, not
> > realizing what was wrong soon enough too much damage was done & even
> > surgery couldn't save her. I hope that's not the case but it's well
> > worth checking.
> > Sending healing thoughts your way, Patty Jo.
>
> They did x-rays but not with contrast of his abdomen. Would it show if
> contrast wasn't used? Lyn?

Possibly/probably not - depends on what it is and what it did.
Intestines are often hard to get a good view, and if it's a thread, its
unlikely you see it unless it was really messing things up and the
intestine in front of it was bulging.

> Why would he not have barfed at the vet in
> the last week? Would the reglan IV have suppressed the urge?

Yes and No - more than likely he would have barfed. Do they know FOR
SURE he was eating? What worries me is if you got an unattentive tech
or assistant who isn't reporting food consumption correctly (assuming
he was free-fed and eating at night, or whatever). Not to add to your
stress, but it happens.

If they were feeding him liquid food via tube and the blockage is only
partial and they had him doped up, he may not have barfed, though. I
certainly would ask the vet about the possibility of a thread or string
- if you can afford it, another x-ray with contrast is worth exploring
at this point, or an exploratory surgery of the abdomen. Also have
them check the *very* base of his tongue for a thread. I have seen a
case where two different vets missed it - and a specialist finaly
caught it - the cat had a thread in it's GI tract and the end had
caught on the base of the tongue and wrapped around - not tight enough
to kill the tongue, but it was there. The cat was majorly vomiting
colored mucus.


>
> I just assumed he didn't poop because he was so terrified. He is a
> former feral and was very horrified the whole time at the vet, hiding
> under his blankies whenever possible. He didn't pee for several days
> either and they wound up cathing him to see if he was blocked. He
> wasn't and then he peed normally after that...well, like once a day. I
> think he was so scared there he just couldn't perform any bodily
> functions. But I don't know about this mucus development...

I don't know Candace - he definitely has an infection of some sort and
the colored mucus indicates GI tract to me. I know you're freaking - I
would be too. At this point, though, I think it's worth exploring all
options you can afford.

keep us posted,
-L.

-L.
February 12th 06, 06:30 AM
mlbriggs wrote:
> If he was "perky and happy" when you brought him home could there be
> something in your house making him sick? This may be off the wall, but do
> you have a carbon monoxide detector?

I thought about that as well - a poison. Have you had carpets cleaned
recently, switched cleaners or anything like that?

-L.

Candace
February 12th 06, 09:49 AM
mlbriggs wrote:

> If he was "perky and happy" when you brought him home could there be
> something in your house making him sick? This may be off the wall, but do
> you have a carbon monoxide detector?

Yes, we have one. He was perky and happy briefly but he wasn't really
perky and happy at the vet at all. I think his perkiness when he got
home was just relief to be out of that cage.

Candace

Candace
February 12th 06, 09:53 AM
-L. wrote:
>
> I thought about that as well - a poison. Have you had carpets cleaned
> recently, switched cleaners or anything like that?
>
> -L.

No...

Candace
February 12th 06, 10:02 AM
-L. wrote:
>
> Possibly/probably not - depends on what it is and what it did.
> Intestines are often hard to get a good view, and if it's a thread, its
> unlikely you see it unless it was really messing things up and the
> intestine in front of it was bulging.
>
> > Why would he not have barfed at the vet in
> > the last week? Would the reglan IV have suppressed the urge?
>
> Yes and No - more than likely he would have barfed. Do they know FOR
> SURE he was eating? What worries me is if you got an unattentive tech
> or assistant who isn't reporting food consumption correctly (assuming
> he was free-fed and eating at night, or whatever). Not to add to your
> stress, but it happens.

Some of the techs seem not as reliable but the one that was there this
a.m. and said he ate seems very responsible. I do know he ate for me a
few times when I was visiting; I would spoon feed him and he would eat
a teaspoonful or so and once he ate some of his dry food when I was
there.
>
> If they were feeding him liquid food via tube and the blockage is only
> partial and they had him doped up, he may not have barfed, though.

They didn't have him doped up at all other than reglan. He was never
on any sedation while there.

> I certainly would ask the vet about the possibility of a thread or string
> - if you can afford it, another x-ray with contrast is worth exploring
> at this point, or an exploratory surgery of the abdomen. Also have
> them check the *very* base of his tongue for a thread. I have seen a
> case where two different vets missed it - and a specialist finaly
> caught it - the cat had a thread in it's GI tract and the end had
> caught on the base of the tongue and wrapped around - not tight enough
> to kill the tongue, but it was there. The cat was majorly vomiting
> colored mucus.

I will ask the vet tomorrow. Only once was the mucus yellow, the other
times it was clear. And now he isn't barfing mucus at all. He is just
barfing small amounts of clear froth every couple of hours...like a
teaspoon. He also feels much cooler, like his fever might have broke.
He is sleeping. The thing is, I've had cats who seemed in pain before
and you could tell by the awkward, uncomfortable positions in which
they would lay...he lays totally comfortably, even now, curled up
normally, sometimes with his head upside down. He doesn't seem in pai,
just nauseated at times. If he had a string wrapped around his
intestines for the past 11 days, wouldn't he be in severe pain?
>
> I don't know Candace - he definitely has an infection of some sort and
> the colored mucus indicates GI tract to me. I know you're freaking - I
> would be too. At this point, though, I think it's worth exploring all
> options you can afford.
>
> keep us posted,
> -L.

Okay...thanks.

Rhonda
February 12th 06, 05:19 PM
Candace wrote:

> He doesn't seem in pain,
> just nauseated at times. If he had a string wrapped around his
> intestines for the past 11 days, wouldn't he be in severe pain?

Hi Candace,

I feel so bad for you and Scottie.

I spent some time last night web-searching and looking through Cornell's
book, and the closest I could come to matching symptoms was a foreign
body in the intestine (if it is a string -- it could be bunched up
inside the intestines, not wrapped around them,) poison, or a tumor. Of
course there are probably many other things, this was with a 30 minute
search by a non-vet. The book did say that many times a foreign body in
the gi tract does not show up on regular x-ray because it could be a
similar thickness as the intestine. I know you've already talked on the
group about getting one done with contrast dye.

Many of the other GI things listed had diarrhea as a symptom, and your
cat seems to be constipated. My cat had pancreatitus, which is very
painful and I wondered about with your cat -- but diarrhea usually goes
along with that too. It seemed that everything coming out of both ends
of our cat was yellow.

I'm sure this is harrowing, but you're doing a great job with Scottie.
It must be a comfort to him (and his buddy) to be home.

Keep us posted,

Rhonda

cybercat
February 12th 06, 06:16 PM
"Candace" > wrote
> He also feels much cooler, like his fever might have broken.
> He is sleeping. The thing is, I've had cats who seemed in pain before
> and you could tell by the awkward, uncomfortable positions in which
> they would lay...he lays totally comfortably, even now, curled up
> normally, sometimes with his head upside down. He doesn't seem in pain,
> just nauseated at times.

This sounds good, like he is improving. I sure hope so.

cybercat
February 12th 06, 06:21 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote :
>
> I'm sure this is harrowing, but you're doing a great job with Scottie.
> It must be a comfort to him (and his buddy) to be home.
>

I think it would be a great idea to set up a fund to help Candace with
the vet bill, but I don't want to be the one to do it. I would sure
contribute,
though, if someone else set it up. Over 2K in a week is really brutal.

Candace
February 12th 06, 06:51 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote :
> >
> > I'm sure this is harrowing, but you're doing a great job with Scottie.
> > It must be a comfort to him (and his buddy) to be home.
> >
>
> I think it would be a great idea to set up a fund to help Candace with
> the vet bill, but I don't want to be the one to do it. I would sure
> contribute,
> though, if someone else set it up. Over 2K in a week is really brutal.

That's very kind of you, really, but I just wouldn't feel right. We
have 2 incomes and credit cards so we can do it...it's just the point
of worrying how long to go with no end in sight. Thank you, I
appreciate the offer.

Candace

Candace
February 12th 06, 07:05 PM
Rhonda wrote:
>
> I spent some time last night web-searching and looking through Cornell's
> book, and the closest I could come to matching symptoms was a foreign
> body in the intestine (if it is a string -- it could be bunched up
> inside the intestines, not wrapped around them,) poison, or a tumor. Of
> course there are probably many other things, this was with a 30 minute
> search by a non-vet. The book did say that many times a foreign body in
> the gi tract does not show up on regular x-ray because it could be a
> similar thickness as the intestine. I know you've already talked on the
> group about getting one done with contrast dye.
>
> Many of the other GI things listed had diarrhea as a symptom, and your
> cat seems to be constipated. My cat had pancreatitus, which is very
> painful and I wondered about with your cat -- but diarrhea usually goes
> along with that too. It seemed that everything coming out of both ends
> of our cat was yellow.
>
Thank you for looking, Rhonda. Poison doesn't make sense to me becaue
he first got ill on a Wed. nite and never barfed until Fri. nite and
then never barfed for a week at the vet. I hope it's not a tumor,
that's my major fear, cancer. It seemed to come on so quick, though.
I've had cats with cancer and it was gradual and then they'd feel okay
for awhile and then get sick again. I hope it's not a string, too, but
I'll ask the vet. Scottie is not notoriously a string swallower but I
know that if they get it in their mouths, their reflex causes them to
continue to swallow. Could he possibly have had a huge "normal,
healthy poo" as the vet said? They gave him 10cc of lactulose, that's
all, and then it was normal. The vet said all along that he wasn't
constipated as he kept feeling him and said his feces didn't feel hard
at all, it was like he was choosing to not go. Wouldn't you think--if
it was a string wrapped around his intestines--that he'd seem to be in
pain. I was present several times when the vet, last Thurs. being the
last time, when the vet did a physical exam on Scottie--you know, where
they poke and prod them pretty hard with their hands. Scottie never
flinched or showed any sign of pain. I would think it would be painful
to have your intestines all sliced up. I don't know, I'm hardly an
expert...Doesn't it seem, too, that the bopwel movement would be
abnormal, like diarrhea, instead of solid if it was coming thru a
mangled intestine?

I wonder if most vets are equipped to do a contrast study or if I would
have to take him elsewhere?

Candace

-L.
February 12th 06, 08:53 PM
Candace wrote:
> Thank you for looking, Rhonda. Poison doesn't make sense to me becaue
> he first got ill on a Wed. nite and never barfed until Fri. nite and
> then never barfed for a week at the vet.

Doesn't really follow poisoning then.

> I hope it's not a tumor,
> that's my major fear, cancer. It seemed to come on so quick, though.
> I've had cats with cancer and it was gradual and then they'd feel okay
> for awhile and then get sick again. I hope it's not a string, too, but
> I'll ask the vet. Scottie is not notoriously a string swallower but I
> know that if they get it in their mouths, their reflex causes them to
> continue to swallow. Could he possibly have had a huge "normal,
> healthy poo" as the vet said?

Yes - if the food was in the small intestine by the time the string was
ingested, it could still be normal afterward.

They gave him 10cc of lactulose, that's
> all, and then it was normal. The vet said all along that he wasn't
> constipated as he kept feeling him and said his feces didn't feel hard
> at all, it was like he was choosing to not go.

There's really no way of knowing for sure unless he reached up into the
colon (rectally) and felt the poop - sometimes you can't feel it by
palpitating. Has he pooped since? (Sorry if some of these questions
have been covered - I have little time online right now.)

> Wouldn't you think--if
> it was a string wrapped around his intestines--that he'd seem to be in
> pain. I was present several times when the vet, last Thurs. being the
> last time, when the vet did a physical exam on Scottie--you know, where
> they poke and prod them pretty hard with their hands. Scottie never
> flinched or showed any sign of pain. I would think it would be painful
> to have your intestines all sliced up. I don't know, I'm hardly an
> expert...Doesn't it seem, too, that the bopwel movement would be
> abnormal, like diarrhea, instead of solid if it was coming thru a
> mangled intestine?

You are right in that he probably wouldn't tolerate being prodded, and
he'd probably be more sick. he may r may not have diarrhea. It could
be a small loop of thread or something that's snagged a small portion
of the intestine, or snagged on a hairball and stuck. Soft blockages
don't show on x-ray and they can cause infection if they sit too long.

>
> I wonder if most vets are equipped to do a contrast study or if I would
> have to take him elsewhere?

They should be able to do it there at your vet. They should take
X-rays over time - IIRC we took them every 20 minutes for the course of
3-4 hours or something like that.

-L.

Candace
February 13th 06, 02:01 AM
-L. wrote:
>
> There's really no way of knowing for sure unless he reached up into the
> colon (rectally) and felt the poop - sometimes you can't feel it by
> palpitating. Has he pooped since? (Sorry if some of these questions
> have been covered - I have little time online right now.)
>
Yay, he pooed a little while ago. I was contemplating giving him some
lactulose but he beat me to it. He didn't strain or anything and it
was a formed, average size poo, not diarrhea or anything. Does that
mean he probably doesn't have a blockage then?

Unfortunately, he also vomited before that after attempting to eat. He
seems to want to eat but then barfs. He's tried eating twice today and
then barfed within a few minutes each time.
>
> They should be able to do it there at your vet. They should take
> X-rays over time - IIRC we took them every 20 minutes for the course of
> 3-4 hours or something like that.

Unless he becomes able to eat tonight, I'll still have to take him in
in the morning because I'm sure he's getting dehydrated and maybe they
can sedate him and do a more thorough exam or something. I don't want
to leave him there again and have him on IVs and back to the way it was
for the last week. He still feels cool, too, like the fever is gone.
I've never taken a cat's temp, I'm afraid to try because I don't know
how far up it goes or how you even get it in there in the first place.

Candace

NMR
February 13th 06, 02:24 AM
Candance try getting some gravy or chicken broth instead of solid food it
might be easier on him being sick
"Candace" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> -L. wrote:
>>
>> There's really no way of knowing for sure unless he reached up into the
>> colon (rectally) and felt the poop - sometimes you can't feel it by
>> palpitating. Has he pooped since? (Sorry if some of these questions
>> have been covered - I have little time online right now.)
>>
> Yay, he pooed a little while ago. I was contemplating giving him some
> lactulose but he beat me to it. He didn't strain or anything and it
> was a formed, average size poo, not diarrhea or anything. Does that
> mean he probably doesn't have a blockage then?
>
> Unfortunately, he also vomited before that after attempting to eat. He
> seems to want to eat but then barfs. He's tried eating twice today and
> then barfed within a few minutes each time.
>>
>> They should be able to do it there at your vet. They should take
>> X-rays over time - IIRC we took them every 20 minutes for the course of
>> 3-4 hours or something like that.
>
> Unless he becomes able to eat tonight, I'll still have to take him in
> in the morning because I'm sure he's getting dehydrated and maybe they
> can sedate him and do a more thorough exam or something. I don't want
> to leave him there again and have him on IVs and back to the way it was
> for the last week. He still feels cool, too, like the fever is gone.
> I've never taken a cat's temp, I'm afraid to try because I don't know
> how far up it goes or how you even get it in there in the first place.
>
> Candace
>

CatNipped
February 13th 06, 03:03 AM
"Candace" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> -L. wrote:
>>
>> There's really no way of knowing for sure unless he reached up into the
>> colon (rectally) and felt the poop - sometimes you can't feel it by
>> palpitating. Has he pooped since? (Sorry if some of these questions
>> have been covered - I have little time online right now.)
>>
> Yay, he pooed a little while ago. I was contemplating giving him some
> lactulose but he beat me to it. He didn't strain or anything and it
> was a formed, average size poo, not diarrhea or anything. Does that
> mean he probably doesn't have a blockage then?
>
> Unfortunately, he also vomited before that after attempting to eat. He
> seems to want to eat but then barfs. He's tried eating twice today and
> then barfed within a few minutes each time.
>>
>> They should be able to do it there at your vet. They should take
>> X-rays over time - IIRC we took them every 20 minutes for the course of
>> 3-4 hours or something like that.
>
> Unless he becomes able to eat tonight, I'll still have to take him in
> in the morning because I'm sure he's getting dehydrated and maybe they
> can sedate him and do a more thorough exam or something. I don't want
> to leave him there again and have him on IVs and back to the way it was
> for the last week. He still feels cool, too, like the fever is gone.
> I've never taken a cat's temp, I'm afraid to try because I don't know
> how far up it goes or how you even get it in there in the first place.
>
> Candace

Have you tried Pepcid to stop the vomiting?

--

Hugs,

CatNipped

See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/

Charlie Wilkes
February 13th 06, 05:14 AM
On 12 Feb 2006 01:49:43 -0800, "Candace" > wrote:

>mlbriggs wrote:
>
>> If he was "perky and happy" when you brought him home could there be
>> something in your house making him sick? This may be off the wall, but do
>> you have a carbon monoxide detector?
>
>Yes, we have one. He was perky and happy briefly but he wasn't really
>perky and happy at the vet at all. I think his perkiness when he got
>home was just relief to be out of that cage.
>
>Candace

Has he been getting oxazepam regularly??? It's a benzo, one of the
short-acting ones I believe. I don't know how it works with cats.
People have to stop taking benzos gradually if they have been on them
for any length of time, especially the short-acting ones.

Keep us posted. I've got my fingers crossed for you and Scottie.

Charlie

Rhonda
February 13th 06, 05:38 AM
Candace wrote:

> -L. wrote:
>
>>There's really no way of knowing for sure unless he reached up into the
>>colon (rectally) and felt the poop - sometimes you can't feel it by
>>palpitating. Has he pooped since? (Sorry if some of these questions
>>have been covered - I have little time online right now.)
>>
>>
> Yay, he pooed a little while ago.


Congrats on the poop! That's great news.

Hope they can find something definitive tomorrow. He's sure hanging in
there!

Rhonda

February 13th 06, 06:59 AM
Candace wrote:
> >
> Yay, he pooed a little while ago. I was contemplating giving him some
> lactulose but he beat me to it. He didn't strain or anything and it
> was a formed, average size poo, not diarrhea or anything. Does that
> mean he probably doesn't have a blockage then?

Probably not.

>
> Unfortunately, he also vomited before that after attempting to eat. He
> seems to want to eat but then barfs. He's tried eating twice today and
> then barfed within a few minutes each time.

Hummm. I know Peewee will become nauseated if he is constipated but
Scottie doesn't seem constipated. Someone else mentioned chicken broth
and Pepcid - which is my remedy for vomiting (under normal
circumstances) as well. Ask the vet about it before giving it to him,
though - I would be cautious about drug interactions. It still almost
sounds like he had an infection in his stomach or something.


>
> Unless he becomes able to eat tonight, I'll still have to take him in
> in the morning because I'm sure he's getting dehydrated and maybe they
> can sedate him and do a more thorough exam or something.

Ask them send you home with sub-Q fluids to prevent dehydration - you
can to them at home twice a day. That will also help to keep him
pooping, peeing and feeling better.

I don't want
> to leave him there again and have him on IVs and back to the way it was
> for the last week. He still feels cool, too, like the fever is gone.
> I've never taken a cat's temp, I'm afraid to try because I don't know
> how far up it goes or how you even get it in there in the first place.

LOL...well, have a tech show you. It's basically a little KY on the
bulb and you stick it in about an inch -straight into the butt. Not
rocket science. ;) It may take two people to hold him, though.

Good luck and keep us posted - I hope his temp broke and the worst of
it is over.

-L.

Phil P.
February 13th 06, 04:49 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
ups.com...


> Yay, he pooed a little while ago. I was contemplating giving him some
> lactulose but he beat me to it. He didn't strain or anything and it
> was a formed, average size poo, not diarrhea or anything. Does that
> mean he probably doesn't have a blockage then?


It doesn't seem like he does. If he did, at this point, he would probably
have diarrhea and wouldn't have an appetite. He seems to want to eat- but
then regurgitates the food.

>
> Unfortunately, he also vomited before that after attempting to eat. He
> seems to want to eat but then barfs. He's tried eating twice today and
> then barfed within a few minutes each time.


Was he barfing before you took him to the vet or just didn't have an
appetite? What made you bring him to the vet in the first place? Just a
fever or fever and vomiting?

I think you mentioned that he seemed to have trouble swallowing after the
feeding tube was removed. Since he barfs almost immediately after he eats,
I think the problem might be in the upper part of his esophagus and is
probably the result of sloppy and/or repeated placement of the feeding tube.
IOW, iatrogenic esophagitis which can lead to esophageal stricture--
although the vet probably will never admit it.

I don't think he's actually vomiting- its sounds more like regurgitation.
Sometimes, its hard to tell the difference between regurgitation, vomiting,
retching, and gagging- and especially expectoration in cats. If the barfed
food was covered with mucus and tubed-shaped without any bile, it was
probably regurgitated. If he barfed up the same type of stuff an hour or
more after eating, he could have a problem in the lower esophagus.



> >
> > They should be able to do it there at your vet. They should take
> > X-rays over time - IIRC we took them every 20 minutes for the course of
> > 3-4 hours or something like that.


Its better to mix some barium in a little food. Straight liquid barium can
still pass around an obstruction.


>
> Unless he becomes able to eat tonight, I'll still have to take him in
> in the morning because I'm sure he's getting dehydrated and maybe they
> can sedate him and do a more thorough exam or something.

Absatively. Cat's can dehydrate quickly and develop electrolyte
disturbances. You might want to ask the vet about an antacid since he
hasn't been getting much food into his stomach. Also, when you feed him,
put his dish on a book or two to keep his head higher than his stomach- this
will help keep stomach acid out of his esophagus-- that can also cause
esophagitis and lead to esophageal stricture.



I don't want
> to leave him there again and have him on IVs and back to the way it was
> for the last week. He still feels cool, too, like the fever is gone.
> I've never taken a cat's temp, I'm afraid to try because I don't know
> how far up it goes or how you even get it in there in the first place.

About an inch. Don't use a glass oral thermometer in a cat's butt- they can
break very easily if the cat struggles. I like the flexible pediatric
digital thermometers. Vicks and BD make pretty good ones for about $10.
Don't forget to grease it up with KY jelly.


http://www.maxshouse.com/PreventativeHealth.htm#Taking_a_Cat's_Temperature


Keep the faith!

Phil

Phil P.
February 13th 06, 05:33 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
oups.com...

> They did x-rays but not with contrast of his abdomen. Would it show if
> contrast wasn't used? Lyn? Why would he not have barfed at the vet in
> the last week? Would the reglan IV have suppressed the urge?


Actually- I don't think reglan is such a good idea since it doesn't seem
like he's actually vomiting. If he ingested a toxin or some other
substance- you'd want him to puke it out. The same principal applies to a
gastrointestinal infection- Reglan could actually prolong the infection.
Since an obstruction hasn't been definitively ruled out- reglan could also
be a problem because of its prokinetic effects that could speed up motility
against an obstruction. From your most recent post, he seems to be doing
better without the reglan.

>
> I just assumed he didn't poop because he was so terrified. He is a
> former feral and was very horrified the whole time at the vet, hiding
> under his blankies whenever possible. He didn't pee for several days
> either and they wound up cathing him to see if he was blocked. He
> wasn't and then he peed normally after that...well, like once a day. I
> think he was so scared there he just couldn't perform any bodily
> functions. But I don't know about this mucus development...


It sounds like expectoration- I've got a feeling his esophagus is irritated
and or inflamed from the tube. Pick up a pack of litmus paper at a hobby
shop- costs about $1- dip a strip in the mucus the next time he brings some
up-- if its acidic it came from the stomach- if it isn't- it came from his
throat.

Phil

Debra Berry
February 13th 06, 08:41 PM
I'm so sorry that Scottie is sick. Since today is Monday I hope
they have been able to do something to help him. Purrs and prayers
to both Scottie and you. I hope to hear better news soon.

Debbie


Candace wrote:
>
> My cat, Scottie, is in his 10th day of fever of unknown origin despite
> antibiotics, first polyflex, then doxycycline added, now baytril and
> doxycycline, polyflex discontinued. He has been hospitalized for a
> week today, on IV fluids and tube feedings. His temp goes up and down.
> All bloodwork and x-rays normal except for elevated white count. He's
> miserable in his cage, obviously. We want him home. Last night he ate
> on his own so he didn't have to be tube fed this a.m., but his temp is
> still 104. If I knew he would eat at home on his own, we would bring
> him home.
>
> The thing is this, his bill is now over $2,000 and nothing has changed.
> We're a little worried about the money. Obviously, if we knew there
> was an end in sight, we would pay willingly but this could drag on
> forever and nothing might change. I am very tempted to bring him home
> with antibiotics and an appetite stimulant and will be discusing this
> with the vet later today when we go to see Scottie. But I've been
> scouring the internet and I sometimes see where people write, "the vet
> gave my cat a fever reducer and some antibiotics and sent him home."
> But no one says what the fever reducer is.
>
> I know aspirin has to be used very sparingly in a cat and I already
> mentioned that to my vet and he didn't seem to favor that idea. I also
> mentioned steroids and he wasn't thrilled with that either because it
> can suppress the immune system. But would a short course of steroids
> hurt anything? And is there something else that might be considered a
> fever reducer?
>
> I know Scottie is terrified there, he spends most of his time hiding
> under a blanket unless I come to see him. I'm sure he's sick of being
> poked and prodded. If we don't bring him home today, we are definitely
> going to have to do so on Monday. I know if he would eat here, he
> would be better off here but I can't guarantee he will eat. They
> couldn't successfully syringe feed him so they have to tube feed him.
> It's not a permanent tube, they just put the tubing partially down his
> throat and connect it to the syringe. Is that something I could be
> taught to do?
>
> Can anyone help me?
>
> Candace

Candace
February 15th 06, 03:51 AM
Phil P. wrote:

> Was he barfing before you took him to the vet or just didn't have an
> appetite? What made you bring him to the vet in the first place? Just a
> fever or fever and vomiting?

A fever and lethargy and inappetance caused me to take him first. He
was snet home with abx and seemd to get worse after 2 days. He then
did barf and I took him in bu it wasn't a mucus-y barf then. Then he
stayed for 7 days, on reglan, etc., did not barf, came home, and barfed
mucus.
>
> I think you mentioned that he seemed to have trouble swallowing after the
> feeding tube was removed. Since he barfs almost immediately after he eats,
> I think the problem might be in the upper part of his esophagus and is
> probably the result of sloppy and/or repeated placement of the feeding tube.
> IOW, iatrogenic esophagitis which can lead to esophageal stricture--
> although the vet probably will never admit it.

That is my theory now, too, esp. since he seems able to tolerate
watered down canned food but will immediately barf if he eats dry food.
No, the vet said that was not possible but I know it is. He was not
having difficulty swallowing before all this and I did notice that he
was a couple of days before his release from the hospital.
Fortunately, it has now dissipated quite a bit and he seems able to
swallow much easier. Maybe in a few days he will be back to normal.
Still don't know why he had a fever and he still has a mild one. He is
off abx for now, on pred and prilosec.
>
> I don't think he's actually vomiting- its sounds more like regurgitation.
> Sometimes, its hard to tell the difference between regurgitation, vomiting,
> retching, and gagging- and especially expectoration in cats. If the barfed
> food was covered with mucus and tubed-shaped without any bile, it was
> probably regurgitated. If he barfed up the same type of stuff an hour or
> more after eating, he could have a problem in the lower esophagus.

> http://www.maxshouse.com/PreventativeHealth.htm#Taking_a_Cat's_Temperature
>
>
> Keep the faith!
>
> Phil

Thank you, I'm feeling a little more positive about his future here on
earth.

Candace

Candace
February 16th 06, 03:30 AM
Phil P. wrote:

> Cats are a lot more resilient than we give them credit for. I think he's on
> the fast track to a complete recovery.
>
>
> Thanks for the update- I was beginning to worry.
>
> Phil

Thank you for your concern and advice--and everyone else, too. He is
now at over 36 hours barf-free and acting almost normal. He's still
not eating as much as I would like but he's doing pretty good. He
loves dry food so I know if he could eat that he would be bulking up
quicker. Maybe this weekend, we'll give him a piece and see how it
goes. At least if he barfs I'll know why. He's no longer gulping or
acting like his throat bothers him so he may be almost healed. Thanks,
all, from my little orange boy!!!!!!

Candace

Phil P.
February 16th 06, 05:32 PM
"Candace" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Phil P. wrote:
>
> > Cats are a lot more resilient than we give them credit for. I think
he's on
> > the fast track to a complete recovery.
> >
> >
> > Thanks for the update- I was beginning to worry.
> >
> > Phil
>
> Thank you for your concern and advice--and everyone else, too. He is
> now at over 36 hours barf-free and acting almost normal. He's still
> not eating as much as I would like but he's doing pretty good. He
> loves dry food so I know if he could eat that he would be bulking up
> quicker. Maybe this weekend, we'll give him a piece and see how it
> goes. At least if he barfs I'll know why. He's no longer gulping or
> acting like his throat bothers him so he may be almost healed. Thanks,
> all, from my little orange boy!!!!!!

I'm happy he's improving! -- but I don't think I'd give him any dry food- at
least for awhile. It might exacerbate his esophageal injury.

Phil