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ensoul
February 12th 06, 03:09 AM
we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
food for indoor cats
got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.


ensoul



Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
~Anne Sexton

cybercat
February 12th 06, 03:23 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>

What exactly is the problem?

Odor?

If so, scoop more often and ventilate. You can open your windows for
a while each day, even when it is cold.

Don't try to cover up the smell, just clean the box more often.

Simple, eh?

Joe Canuck
February 12th 06, 03:33 AM
ensoul wrote:
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>
>
> ensoul
>
>
>
> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
> ~Anne Sexton
>

How many cats and exactly what is the issue?

Judy
February 12th 06, 06:24 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>
>
> ensoul

I have one cat and two litter boxes. She likes to pee in one and poop in the
other. When it comes to litter, I use one that is clumping and flushable.
When I detect an odor, I scoop and flush. Usually twice a day. I use the Arm
& Hammer on occasions when she's taken a notion not to bury. Don't just
sprinkle it on top, mix it in.

As a result of my regime, the odor is around for as long as it takes me to
scoop, flush, sprinkle and mix. About 2 minutes?

You didn't mention how many cats you have, but if you only have room for one
box, perhaps consider a flushable clumping litter and scoop more often.

jmc
February 12th 06, 08:43 AM
Suddenly, without warning, ensoul exclaimed (12-Feb-06 3:09 AM):
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>
>
> ensoul
>
>
>
> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
> ~Anne Sexton
>

You don't mention exactly how many cats. Many people suggest you should
have one more litterbox than you have cats. I do realize that it may be
a space issue, but you should have at least as many boxes as cats.

If the problem is odor, try a different cat food. I've just recently
put Meep The Non-Burying Cat on Royal Canin (Mature Indoor, I think),
and she's gone from Oh, My God What An Amazing Stink to Oh, I didn't
Realize She Had...

As for litter, World's Best Cat Litter is, well, the best. Flushable,
covers smell well when she does bury, lasts a long time if I clean
regular, clumps just enough.

Are they both using the boxes, or do you have a problem with one or the
other going outside the boxes?

jmc

PawsForThought
February 12th 06, 04:37 PM
jmc wrote:
> If the problem is odor, try a different cat food. I've just recently
> put Meep The Non-Burying Cat on Royal Canin (Mature Indoor, I think),
> and she's gone from Oh, My God What An Amazing Stink to Oh, I didn't
> Realize She Had...

I agree. Feeding a high quality food can really make a very big
difference in the smell and amount of feces in the litterbox. We use
Swheat Scoop and have been happy with it.

February 12th 06, 04:41 PM
ensoul wrote:
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
> ensoul
>
> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
> ~Anne Sexton

I like SwheatScoop. It's wheat, plain wheat. The others use clay or
other things which are somewhat associated with serious medical
problems. I gather you're really asking about the smell? I don't
smell anything with the wheat product for some reason. It's much
more expensive unless you can find wheat on farms?

Arm & Hammer, was that ordinary baking soda? Put some in the
bottom of the box before filling. Might help and it's inexpensive?
You would sprinkle this on the bottom of the litter, not the top,
according to ShweatScoop. Maybe sprinkle both ways. But it's the
bottom if not deep enough that accumulates nasty stuff.
Are you filling to at least 3 inches deep too? That helps a lot.
Measure with a ruler, 3 inches is very, very deep.

You might try scooping more than once a day. Basically that's all
the $100 machine does. Scoop, poop, scoop, poop, scoop, poop...
Or is that poop, scoop, poop, scoop, poop, scoop, poop, scoop...

About your sig, Anne Sexton sure did not take her own advice in
regards to trusting her soul to her the_rapists. Especially that one
in Boston. What an unethical *******, and directed the family clinic?
And the previous one in Philly who released her tapes but did nothing
about the bum in boston? Very sad.

ensoul
February 12th 06, 11:33 PM
the smell, both boxes get cleaned everyday...opening window is not an
option I ilive in State it's 20 degree's and with wind chill much
worse....I have tried OUT a spary to get rid of urine & feces odor,
also arm & hammer stuff that you sprinkle both of these products only
work temporarily


ensoul

ensoul
February 12th 06, 11:34 PM
sorry 2 cats and 2 litter boxes, they're brothers


ensoul

Joe Canuck
February 12th 06, 11:59 PM
ensoul wrote:
> sorry 2 cats and 2 litter boxes, they're brothers
>
>
> ensoul
>

Well, if the smell is the big issue you can start with what they are
consuming... because usually if the food they are consuming doesn't
agree with them or isn't the best what comes out the other end will
smell horribilis! :-D

So, what do you feed them? ...and have you considered switch, gradually,
to something else?

cybercat
February 13th 06, 12:00 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> the smell, both boxes get cleaned everyday...opening window is not an
> option I ilive in State it's 20 degree's and with wind chill much
> worse....I have tried OUT a spary to get rid of urine & feces odor,
> also arm & hammer stuff that you sprinkle both of these products only
> work temporarily

Scoop more often. Once a day is not enough if you have a foul smell
about your place.

February 13th 06, 02:27 AM
ensoul wrote:
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.

i just thought of something. parasite can make a big stink. have you
ever check them for blood parasites beside stool parasite?

Judy
February 13th 06, 05:12 AM
"Joe Canuck" > wrote in message
...
> ensoul wrote:
>> sorry 2 cats and 2 litter boxes, they're brothers
>>
>>
>> ensoul
>>
>
> Well, if the smell is the big issue you can start with what they are
> consuming... because usually if the food they are consuming doesn't agree
> with them or isn't the best what comes out the other end will smell
> horribilis! :-D
>
> So, what do you feed them? ...and have you considered switch, gradually,
> to something else?

Switching foods might be helpful, but the fact remains that eliminations
from a body usually result in a stink.

Perhaps the OP needs to spend more time tending to the litterbox. The moment
I smell offensive odours emanating from the litter boxes in my home, I take
care of them
the same way as the toilet gets flushed after it's been used.

Eliminating fowl odours isn't rocket science.

Shardonay
February 14th 06, 01:28 AM
jmc wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, ensoul exclaimed (12-Feb-06 3:09 AM):
>
>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>> food for indoor cats
>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>
>>
>> ensoul
>>
>>
>>
>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard. ~Anne Sexton
>>
>
> You don't mention exactly how many cats. Many people suggest you should
> have one more litterbox than you have cats. I do realize that it may be
> a space issue, but you should have at least as many boxes as cats.
>
> If the problem is odor, try a different cat food. I've just recently
> put Meep The Non-Burying Cat on Royal Canin (Mature Indoor, I think),
> and she's gone from Oh, My God What An Amazing Stink to Oh, I didn't
> Realize She Had...
>
> As for litter, World's Best Cat Litter is, well, the best. Flushable,
> covers smell well when she does bury, lasts a long time if I clean
> regular, clumps just enough.
>
> Are they both using the boxes, or do you have a problem with one or the
> other going outside the boxes?
>
> jmc

I have one box for 2 cats. No problem. Just scoop every day. I use
Scoop Away because it clumps better and smells better than the others
I've tried (Tidy Cats, Arm and Hammer)

February 17th 06, 01:04 AM
Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely dangerous
for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from the paws, it
forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can cause anything from
pain to death. If you're using a product that fits this description and
most especially if you have a long haired cat that gets quite a bit of
litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a pretty dangerous combination.

Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds of
litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that damages
breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen. Several
years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die from the
effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and painful death
that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life. As if all of that
wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not eco-friendly either. I really have
nothing good to say about clay litters, and most especially about clumping
clay litters.

My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem, so
don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or your cat
through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight was something
nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are suffering needlessly
while the makers of these products count their blood money and insist their
customers are perfectly happy injuring and killing their beloved pets with
their "convenient" products.

***Alternatives***

Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe as
long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural oils-removed)
pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat varieties don't have any
pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially prepared ones, don't try to make
your own.) I buy a very large bag of it twice a year and that's it! It's
$20 or $25 but that's Canadian money too, so it should be even cheaper if
you're in the States.

The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the same
thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's amazing. There is
NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and not two, three or even
four weeks later. After a month I change Tashi's litter, even though I can
literally pick up her litter box and sniff it and still detect no scent at
all. By then the pellets are mostly saw dust and that's when it's time to
replace them. I do remove solid waste right away, and a little saw dust
usually sticks to that, but it's perfectly safe to flush small amounts of
saw dust. When I dump out the litter into a big green garbage bag, I place
the pan in the tub and pour boiling water all around the sides and into it
and let it sit for a while. Then I dump the water down the toilet and dry
the pan with a paper towel. Because I'm using soft wood instead of hard
silica, the pan stays in perfect non-scratched condition so it's easy to
keep it hygienic. It always looks brand new to be honest.

Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to use.
It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable. It has no
dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or your cat to
inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over the house. I never
thought a litter would come along as perfect as pine litter. Even the most
finicky nose can not even detect it's presence in the home and almost too
good to be true, it's inexpensive too - it's like a dream come true if you
ask me. You pour out pellets and as the litter gets used up, it turns to
saw dust. At no point along the way does it have a bad smell... just give
it a stir when removing poop (if you want, usually I don't even do that) and
when it's more sawdust and less pellets, replace it... very simple and easy
to use.

Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you want
to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of your
current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current product
until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has any setbacks,
simply slow down the process. Another option would be to toilet train your
cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would ever do such a thing
willingly, which is not true. When I was growing up, we had a cat that
taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let someone with an agenda (or
maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal and natural and what isn't. If
your cat doesn't want to learn toilet training, trust me, it won't. Cats do
not humor us with stupid pet tricks. They leave that sort of thing to dogs
and humans. So you see there is absolutely no need to put up with indoor
cat smelly litter anymore, those days are gone forever for me and I love it.

The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.

==================================================

"ensoul" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
> food for indoor cats
> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>
>
> ensoul
>
>
>
> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
> ~Anne Sexton
>

meee
February 17th 06, 01:18 AM
Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper litters
that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help would be
appreciated!!

> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely dangerous
> for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from the paws, it
> forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can cause anything from
> pain to death. If you're using a product that fits this description and
> most especially if you have a long haired cat that gets quite a bit of
> litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a pretty dangerous
> combination.
>
> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds
> of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that
> damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen.
> Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die
> from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and
> painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life. As
> if all of that wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not eco-friendly either.
> I really have nothing good to say about clay litters, and most especially
> about clumping clay litters.
>
> My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem, so
> don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or your
> cat through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight was
> something nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are suffering
> needlessly while the makers of these products count their blood money and
> insist their customers are perfectly happy injuring and killing their
> beloved pets with their "convenient" products.
>
> ***Alternatives***
>
> Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe as
> long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural oils-removed)
> pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat varieties don't have
> any pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially prepared ones, don't try
> to make your own.) I buy a very large bag of it twice a year and that's
> it! It's $20 or $25 but that's Canadian money too, so it should be even
> cheaper if you're in the States.
>
> The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the
> same thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's amazing.
> There is NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and not two,
> three or even four weeks later. After a month I change Tashi's litter,
> even though I can literally pick up her litter box and sniff it and still
> detect no scent at all. By then the pellets are mostly saw dust and
> that's when it's time to replace them. I do remove solid waste right
> away, and a little saw dust usually sticks to that, but it's perfectly
> safe to flush small amounts of saw dust. When I dump out the litter into
> a big green garbage bag, I place the pan in the tub and pour boiling water
> all around the sides and into it and let it sit for a while. Then I dump
> the water down the toilet and dry the pan with a paper towel. Because I'm
> using soft wood instead of hard silica, the pan stays in perfect
> non-scratched condition so it's easy to keep it hygienic. It always looks
> brand new to be honest.
>
> Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to use.
> It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable. It has
> no dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or your cat to
> inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over the house. I
> never thought a litter would come along as perfect as pine litter. Even
> the most finicky nose can not even detect it's presence in the home and
> almost too good to be true, it's inexpensive too - it's like a dream come
> true if you ask me. You pour out pellets and as the litter gets used up,
> it turns to saw dust. At no point along the way does it have a bad
> smell... just give it a stir when removing poop (if you want, usually I
> don't even do that) and when it's more sawdust and less pellets, replace
> it... very simple and easy to use.
>
> Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you
> want to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of
> your current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current
> product until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has any
> setbacks, simply slow down the process. Another option would be to toilet
> train your cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would ever do such
> a thing willingly, which is not true. When I was growing up, we had a cat
> that taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let someone with an agenda
> (or maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal and natural and what
> isn't. If your cat doesn't want to learn toilet training, trust me, it
> won't. Cats do not humor us with stupid pet tricks. They leave that sort
> of thing to dogs and humans. So you see there is absolutely no need to
> put up with indoor cat smelly litter anymore, those days are gone forever
> for me and I love it.
>
> The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.
>
> ==================================================
>
> "ensoul" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>> food for indoor cats
>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>
>>
>> ensoul
>>
>>
>>
>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
>> ~Anne Sexton
>>
>
>

Corey Kaye
February 17th 06, 01:34 AM
meee wrote:

> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help
> would be appreciated!!

Do you have wood pellet burning stoves down there? The pellets for those
stoves is pretty much the same thing as wood pellet kitty litter.

We also have a product called Woody Pet here, used as bedding for horses,
that is also wood pellets.

I'm sure you could find one or the other :)

Corey

meee
February 17th 06, 01:45 AM
"Corey Kaye" > wrote in message
...
> meee wrote:
>
>> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
>> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
>> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help
>> would be appreciated!!
>
> Do you have wood pellet burning stoves down there? The pellets for those
> stoves is pretty much the same thing as wood pellet kitty litter.
>
> We also have a product called Woody Pet here, used as bedding for horses,
> that is also wood pellets.
>
> I'm sure you could find one or the other :)
>
> Corey
>
>
Thanks!! I have seen the wooden stove pellets down south, but I'm in
Tropical North Queensland, so the horse bedding would probably be better. I
have 6 cats so I've tried the paper litter and it gets smelly too quickly.
Right now I'm using a friskies sandy looking litter, which is designed for
multiple cat households apparently, but it says 'natural clay product with
odour control system' and that's it. If it's dangerous I wouldn't want to
use it. I like the sound of a natural non-smelly litter.

February 17th 06, 01:52 AM
I get Tashi's at the big pet supply store here (In Canada) called Pet Cetera
or whatever it's called. I have a friend who owns a cat in Orange, so I've
written him to ask a few questions on your behalf... I'll come back with his
reply ASAP, sorry for delay.


"meee" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help would
> be appreciated!!
>
> > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely
>> dangerous for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from
>> the paws, it forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can cause
>> anything from pain to death. If you're using a product that fits this
>> description and most especially if you have a long haired cat that gets
>> quite a bit of litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a pretty
>> dangerous combination.
>>
>> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds
>> of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that
>> damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen.
>> Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die
>> from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and
>> painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life. As
>> if all of that wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not eco-friendly either.
>> I really have nothing good to say about clay litters, and most especially
>> about clumping clay litters.
>>
>> My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem, so
>> don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or your
>> cat through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight was
>> something nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are suffering
>> needlessly while the makers of these products count their blood money and
>> insist their customers are perfectly happy injuring and killing their
>> beloved pets with their "convenient" products.
>>
>> ***Alternatives***
>>
>> Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe as
>> long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural oils-removed)
>> pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat varieties don't have
>> any pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially prepared ones, don't try
>> to make your own.) I buy a very large bag of it twice a year and that's
>> it! It's $20 or $25 but that's Canadian money too, so it should be even
>> cheaper if you're in the States.
>>
>> The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the
>> same thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's amazing.
>> There is NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and not two,
>> three or even four weeks later. After a month I change Tashi's litter,
>> even though I can literally pick up her litter box and sniff it and still
>> detect no scent at all. By then the pellets are mostly saw dust and
>> that's when it's time to replace them. I do remove solid waste right
>> away, and a little saw dust usually sticks to that, but it's perfectly
>> safe to flush small amounts of saw dust. When I dump out the litter into
>> a big green garbage bag, I place the pan in the tub and pour boiling
>> water all around the sides and into it and let it sit for a while. Then
>> I dump the water down the toilet and dry the pan with a paper towel.
>> Because I'm using soft wood instead of hard silica, the pan stays in
>> perfect non-scratched condition so it's easy to keep it hygienic. It
>> always looks brand new to be honest.
>>
>> Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to use.
>> It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable. It has
>> no dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or your cat to
>> inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over the house. I
>> never thought a litter would come along as perfect as pine litter. Even
>> the most finicky nose can not even detect it's presence in the home and
>> almost too good to be true, it's inexpensive too - it's like a dream come
>> true if you ask me. You pour out pellets and as the litter gets used up,
>> it turns to saw dust. At no point along the way does it have a bad
>> smell... just give it a stir when removing poop (if you want, usually I
>> don't even do that) and when it's more sawdust and less pellets, replace
>> it... very simple and easy to use.
>>
>> Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you
>> want to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of
>> your current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current
>> product until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has any
>> setbacks, simply slow down the process. Another option would be to
>> toilet train your cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would ever
>> do such a thing willingly, which is not true. When I was growing up, we
>> had a cat that taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let someone
>> with an agenda (or maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal and
>> natural and what isn't. If your cat doesn't want to learn toilet
>> training, trust me, it won't. Cats do not humor us with stupid pet
>> tricks. They leave that sort of thing to dogs and humans. So you see
>> there is absolutely no need to put up with indoor cat smelly litter
>> anymore, those days are gone forever for me and I love it.
>>
>> The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.
>>
>> ==================================================
>>
>> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>>> food for indoor cats
>>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>>
>>>
>>> ensoul
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
>>> ~Anne Sexton
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

meee
February 17th 06, 02:02 AM
thankyou very much!! I really appreciate you going to all this trouble :)
> wrote in message
news:E%[email protected]
>I get Tashi's at the big pet supply store here (In Canada) called Pet
>Cetera or whatever it's called. I have a friend who owns a cat in Orange,
>so I've written him to ask a few questions on your behalf... I'll come back
>with his reply ASAP, sorry for delay.
>
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
>> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
>> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help
>> would be appreciated!!
>>
>> > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely
>>> dangerous for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from
>>> the paws, it forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can cause
>>> anything from pain to death. If you're using a product that fits this
>>> description and most especially if you have a long haired cat that gets
>>> quite a bit of litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a pretty
>>> dangerous combination.
>>>
>>> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds
>>> of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that
>>> damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen.
>>> Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die
>>> from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and
>>> painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life. As
>>> if all of that wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not eco-friendly
>>> either. I really have nothing good to say about clay litters, and most
>>> especially about clumping clay litters.
>>>
>>> My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem,
>>> so don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or
>>> your cat through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight
>>> was something nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are
>>> suffering needlessly while the makers of these products count their
>>> blood money and insist their customers are perfectly happy injuring and
>>> killing their beloved pets with their "convenient" products.
>>>
>>> ***Alternatives***
>>>
>>> Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe
>>> as long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural
>>> oils-removed) pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat
>>> varieties don't have any pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially
>>> prepared ones, don't try to make your own.) I buy a very large bag of
>>> it twice a year and that's it! It's $20 or $25 but that's Canadian
>>> money too, so it should be even cheaper if you're in the States.
>>>
>>> The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the
>>> same thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's amazing.
>>> There is NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and not two,
>>> three or even four weeks later. After a month I change Tashi's litter,
>>> even though I can literally pick up her litter box and sniff it and
>>> still detect no scent at all. By then the pellets are mostly saw dust
>>> and that's when it's time to replace them. I do remove solid waste
>>> right away, and a little saw dust usually sticks to that, but it's
>>> perfectly safe to flush small amounts of saw dust. When I dump out the
>>> litter into a big green garbage bag, I place the pan in the tub and pour
>>> boiling water all around the sides and into it and let it sit for a
>>> while. Then I dump the water down the toilet and dry the pan with a
>>> paper towel. Because I'm using soft wood instead of hard silica, the pan
>>> stays in perfect non-scratched condition so it's easy to keep it
>>> hygienic. It always looks brand new to be honest.
>>>
>>> Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to
>>> use. It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable.
>>> It has no dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or
>>> your cat to inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over the
>>> house. I never thought a litter would come along as perfect as pine
>>> litter. Even the most finicky nose can not even detect it's presence in
>>> the home and almost too good to be true, it's inexpensive too - it's
>>> like a dream come true if you ask me. You pour out pellets and as the
>>> litter gets used up, it turns to saw dust. At no point along the way
>>> does it have a bad smell... just give it a stir when removing poop (if
>>> you want, usually I don't even do that) and when it's more sawdust and
>>> less pellets, replace it... very simple and easy to use.
>>>
>>> Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you
>>> want to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of
>>> your current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current
>>> product until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has any
>>> setbacks, simply slow down the process. Another option would be to
>>> toilet train your cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would ever
>>> do such a thing willingly, which is not true. When I was growing up, we
>>> had a cat that taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let someone
>>> with an agenda (or maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal and
>>> natural and what isn't. If your cat doesn't want to learn toilet
>>> training, trust me, it won't. Cats do not humor us with stupid pet
>>> tricks. They leave that sort of thing to dogs and humans. So you see
>>> there is absolutely no need to put up with indoor cat smelly litter
>>> anymore, those days are gone forever for me and I love it.
>>>
>>> The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.
>>>
>>> ==================================================
>>>
>>> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>>> oups.com...
>>>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>>>> food for indoor cats
>>>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>>>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>>>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>>>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>>>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>>>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>>>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>>>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ensoul
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
>>>> ~Anne Sexton
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

February 17th 06, 04:02 AM
Be REAL careful when "making do" with an alternative as pine is actually
used to keep cats AWAY from things, the only reason a cat will go near
properly prepared cat pine litter is that it's had all of the offending (and
usually allergic to cats) pine oils removed from it.

Call around to your local pet supply places... if they don't know what
you're talking about, ask to speak to the manager or something... pine
litter has been out here for quite some time and there's no excuse for
someone not to offer an economical and ecologically safe alternative like
that.

Anyways, pine shavings used for bedding would very likely not work as they
are very different from kiln-dried, all-oils-removed pellets. Please be
careful. Email me directly if you have any questions or want to see
pictures of it, etc. Anything I can do to help, I am happy to try.



"meee" > wrote in message
...
> thankyou very much!! I really appreciate you going to all this trouble :)
> > wrote in message
> news:E%[email protected]
>>I get Tashi's at the big pet supply store here (In Canada) called Pet
>>Cetera or whatever it's called. I have a friend who owns a cat in Orange,
>>so I've written him to ask a few questions on your behalf... I'll come
>>back with his reply ASAP, sorry for delay.
>>
>>
>> "meee" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
>>> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
>>> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help
>>> would be appreciated!!
>>>
>>> > wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]
>>>> Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely
>>>> dangerous for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from
>>>> the paws, it forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can
>>>> cause anything from pain to death. If you're using a product that fits
>>>> this description and most especially if you have a long haired cat that
>>>> gets quite a bit of litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a
>>>> pretty dangerous combination.
>>>>
>>>> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these
>>>> kinds of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale
>>>> that damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known
>>>> carcinogen. Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I
>>>> had a cat die from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it
>>>> was a slow and painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest
>>>> of my life. As if all of that wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not
>>>> eco-friendly either. I really have nothing good to say about clay
>>>> litters, and most especially about clumping clay litters.
>>>>
>>>> My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem,
>>>> so don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or
>>>> your cat through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight
>>>> was something nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are
>>>> suffering needlessly while the makers of these products count their
>>>> blood money and insist their customers are perfectly happy injuring and
>>>> killing their beloved pets with their "convenient" products.
>>>>
>>>> ***Alternatives***
>>>>
>>>> Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe
>>>> as long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural
>>>> oils-removed) pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat
>>>> varieties don't have any pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially
>>>> prepared ones, don't try to make your own.) I buy a very large bag of
>>>> it twice a year and that's it! It's $20 or $25 but that's Canadian
>>>> money too, so it should be even cheaper if you're in the States.
>>>>
>>>> The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the
>>>> same thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's amazing.
>>>> There is NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and not two,
>>>> three or even four weeks later. After a month I change Tashi's litter,
>>>> even though I can literally pick up her litter box and sniff it and
>>>> still detect no scent at all. By then the pellets are mostly saw dust
>>>> and that's when it's time to replace them. I do remove solid waste
>>>> right away, and a little saw dust usually sticks to that, but it's
>>>> perfectly safe to flush small amounts of saw dust. When I dump out the
>>>> litter into a big green garbage bag, I place the pan in the tub and
>>>> pour boiling water all around the sides and into it and let it sit for
>>>> a while. Then I dump the water down the toilet and dry the pan with a
>>>> paper towel. Because I'm using soft wood instead of hard silica, the
>>>> pan stays in perfect non-scratched condition so it's easy to keep it
>>>> hygienic. It always looks brand new to be honest.
>>>>
>>>> Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to
>>>> use. It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable.
>>>> It has no dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or
>>>> your cat to inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over the
>>>> house. I never thought a litter would come along as perfect as pine
>>>> litter. Even the most finicky nose can not even detect it's presence
>>>> in the home and almost too good to be true, it's inexpensive too - it's
>>>> like a dream come true if you ask me. You pour out pellets and as the
>>>> litter gets used up, it turns to saw dust. At no point along the way
>>>> does it have a bad smell... just give it a stir when removing poop (if
>>>> you want, usually I don't even do that) and when it's more sawdust and
>>>> less pellets, replace it... very simple and easy to use.
>>>>
>>>> Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you
>>>> want to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of
>>>> your current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current
>>>> product until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has
>>>> any setbacks, simply slow down the process. Another option would be to
>>>> toilet train your cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would
>>>> ever do such a thing willingly, which is not true. When I was growing
>>>> up, we had a cat that taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let
>>>> someone with an agenda (or maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal
>>>> and natural and what isn't. If your cat doesn't want to learn toilet
>>>> training, trust me, it won't. Cats do not humor us with stupid pet
>>>> tricks. They leave that sort of thing to dogs and humans. So you see
>>>> there is absolutely no need to put up with indoor cat smelly litter
>>>> anymore, those days are gone forever for me and I love it.
>>>>
>>>> The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.
>>>>
>>>> ==================================================
>>>>
>>>> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>>>> oups.com...
>>>>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>>>>> food for indoor cats
>>>>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>>>>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>>>>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>>>>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>>>>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>>>>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>>>>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>>>>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> ensoul
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
>>>>> ~Anne Sexton
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

meee
February 17th 06, 04:09 AM
> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Be REAL careful when "making do" with an alternative as pine is actually
> used to keep cats AWAY from things, the only reason a cat will go near
> properly prepared cat pine litter is that it's had all of the offending
> (and usually allergic to cats) pine oils removed from it.
>
> Call around to your local pet supply places... if they don't know what
> you're talking about, ask to speak to the manager or something... pine
> litter has been out here for quite some time and there's no excuse for
> someone not to offer an economical and ecologically safe alternative like
> that.
>
> Anyways, pine shavings used for bedding would very likely not work as they
> are very different from kiln-dried, all-oils-removed pellets. Please be
> careful. Email me directly if you have any questions or want to see
> pictures of it, etc. Anything I can do to help, I am happy to try.
>
Thankyou very much :) My neighbour's told me of a pet supply shop down the
road that's supposedly good so I will go and check that out. I have to go
there anyway to ask about bulk cat food for my growing bunch, so I will have
another excuse now!!
>
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
>> thankyou very much!! I really appreciate you going to all this trouble :)
>> > wrote in message
>> news:E%[email protected]
>>>I get Tashi's at the big pet supply store here (In Canada) called Pet
>>>Cetera or whatever it's called. I have a friend who owns a cat in
>>>Orange, so I've written him to ask a few questions on your behalf... I'll
>>>come back with his reply ASAP, sorry for delay.
>>>
>>>
>>> "meee" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Hi, I was wondering if you would know where I can get pine litter in
>>>> Australia? All that seems to be available here is clay and newspaper
>>>> litters that don't work very well and the cats' don't like. Any help
>>>> would be appreciated!!
>>>>
>>>> > wrote in message
>>>> news:[email protected]
>>>>> Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely
>>>>> dangerous for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming
>>>>> from the paws, it forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which
>>>>> can cause anything from pain to death. If you're using a product that
>>>>> fits this description and most especially if you have a long haired
>>>>> cat that gets quite a bit of litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that
>>>>> was a pretty dangerous combination.
>>>>>
>>>>> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these
>>>>> kinds of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale
>>>>> that damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known
>>>>> carcinogen. Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I
>>>>> had a cat die from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it
>>>>> was a slow and painful death that I will feel guilty about for the
>>>>> rest of my life. As if all of that wasn't bad enough, clay mines are
>>>>> not eco-friendly either. I really have nothing good to say about clay
>>>>> litters, and most especially about clumping clay litters.
>>>>>
>>>>> My veterinarian was NO help whatsoever with figuring out this problem,
>>>>> so don't expect yours to be! Don't put yourself through the guilt or
>>>>> your cat through the pain. What seems like common sense in hindsight
>>>>> was something nobody figured out at the time, and so many cats are
>>>>> suffering needlessly while the makers of these products count their
>>>>> blood money and insist their customers are perfectly happy injuring
>>>>> and killing their beloved pets with their "convenient" products.
>>>>>
>>>>> ***Alternatives***
>>>>>
>>>>> Try pine wood pellet, corn or wheat litters. They're natural and safe
>>>>> as long as the pine kind is only made from kiln-dried (natural
>>>>> oils-removed) pine sawdust formed into pellets and the corn/wheat
>>>>> varieties don't have any pesticide residues. (i.e. buy commercially
>>>>> prepared ones, don't try to make your own.) I buy a very large bag of
>>>>> it twice a year and that's it! It's $20 or $25 but that's Canadian
>>>>> money too, so it should be even cheaper if you're in the States.
>>>>>
>>>>> The shelter I got Tashi from was using a pine wood litter so I got the
>>>>> same thing to ease her transition and I'm so glad I did. It's
>>>>> amazing. There is NO unpleasant scent whatsoever! Not right away and
>>>>> not two, three or even four weeks later. After a month I change
>>>>> Tashi's litter, even though I can literally pick up her litter box and
>>>>> sniff it and still detect no scent at all. By then the pellets are
>>>>> mostly saw dust and that's when it's time to replace them. I do
>>>>> remove solid waste right away, and a little saw dust usually sticks to
>>>>> that, but it's perfectly safe to flush small amounts of saw dust.
>>>>> When I dump out the litter into a big green garbage bag, I place the
>>>>> pan in the tub and pour boiling water all around the sides and into it
>>>>> and let it sit for a while. Then I dump the water down the toilet and
>>>>> dry the pan with a paper towel. Because I'm using soft wood instead of
>>>>> hard silica, the pan stays in perfect non-scratched condition so it's
>>>>> easy to keep it hygienic. It always looks brand new to be honest.
>>>>>
>>>>> Pine litter is environmentally friendly and 100% natural and safe to
>>>>> use. It's so long lasting, controls odors perfectly and is affordable.
>>>>> It has no dust during use or while cleaning and replacing for you or
>>>>> your cat to inhale. It doesn't stick to your cat or track all over
>>>>> the house. I never thought a litter would come along as perfect as
>>>>> pine litter. Even the most finicky nose can not even detect it's
>>>>> presence in the home and almost too good to be true, it's inexpensive
>>>>> too - it's like a dream come true if you ask me. You pour out pellets
>>>>> and as the litter gets used up, it turns to saw dust. At no point
>>>>> along the way does it have a bad smell... just give it a stir when
>>>>> removing poop (if you want, usually I don't even do that) and when
>>>>> it's more sawdust and less pellets, replace it... very simple and easy
>>>>> to use.
>>>>>
>>>>> Messing with the litter a cat is used to can be problematic, so if you
>>>>> want to switch to pine litter, put an inch of it underneath a layer of
>>>>> your current product without stirring and slowly reduce your current
>>>>> product until nothing is left but the pine pellets. If your cat has
>>>>> any setbacks, simply slow down the process. Another option would be
>>>>> to toilet train your cats. Some say it's not natural and no cat would
>>>>> ever do such a thing willingly, which is not true. When I was growing
>>>>> up, we had a cat that taught himself to use the toilet, so don't let
>>>>> someone with an agenda (or maybe just jealous?) tell you what's normal
>>>>> and natural and what isn't. If your cat doesn't want to learn toilet
>>>>> training, trust me, it won't. Cats do not humor us with stupid pet
>>>>> tricks. They leave that sort of thing to dogs and humans. So you see
>>>>> there is absolutely no need to put up with indoor cat smelly litter
>>>>> anymore, those days are gone forever for me and I love it.
>>>>>
>>>>> The above was taken from Tashi's website and reworded slightly.
>>>>>
>>>>> ==================================================
>>>>>
>>>>> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>>>>> oups.com...
>>>>>> we have cats, male, fixed, ayear old indoor cats, we always buy them
>>>>>> food for indoor cats
>>>>>> got them at the SPCA, even though we have a small place I asked if we
>>>>>> sahould have 2 litter boxes, they said yes since some cats don't like
>>>>>> sharing....we've tried so many different kinds, have spray called OUT
>>>>>> for urine and feces odor and a Arm & Hammer product that you sprinkle
>>>>>> on top of the litter, they help some, and one of cats, not sure which
>>>>>> one doesn't cover his poop.....I scoop them every day...please don't
>>>>>> suggest one of those machines that self cleans they run $100 and we
>>>>>> can't afforfd....as always apprecaite your suggestions.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> ensoul
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Put your ear down close to your soul and listen hard.
>>>>>> ~Anne Sexton
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Toni
February 17th 06, 01:41 PM
> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds
> of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that
> damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen.
> Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die
> from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and
> painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life.



Any documentation as to cause of death?

I ask not to be rude, but sincerely want to know. I have heard these things
about clumping litter before but always in an anecdotal sense. My feline
specialist says it is not a valid concern, the Tufts cat newsletter reported
the same thing, and I have yet to be able to find any documented cases.


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

NanCe via CatKB.com
February 17th 06, 05:13 PM
>Clumping clay litter that contains sodium bentonite is extremely dangerous
>for your felines as when ingested during normal grooming from the paws, it
>forms hard clumps in their digestive tracts which can cause anything from
>pain to death. If you're using a product that fits this description and
>most especially if you have a long haired cat that gets quite a bit of
>litter stuck to their fur, I'd say that was a pretty dangerous combination.

There are no cases of cats dying from ingesting litter on record anywhere.
There is only one case of a dog having clumping litter inside of him and he
ate a lot of it out of the cat's box.

>Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds of
>litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that damages
>breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen. Several
>years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die from the
>effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and painful death
>that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life. As if all of that
>wasn't bad enough, clay mines are not eco-friendly either. I really have
>nothing good to say about clay litters, and most especially about clumping
>clay litters.

Thousands upon thousands of cats have used regular litter throughout the
years and are fine and lived to a ripe old age. My sister's 23 year old cat
has used nothing but. The only cases of silica problems are in miners who
work in the mines and inhale large amounts. If a cat has asthma, then
perhaps a different litter is in order, but wheat and corn also have dust.

Sorry about your cat but was an autoposy done? That would have been the only
way to tell if it was clumping litter.

NanCe

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

PawsForThought
February 17th 06, 06:01 PM
NanCe via CatKB.com wrote:
Thousands upon thousands of cats have used regular litter throughout
the
> years and are fine and lived to a ripe old age. My sister's 23 year old cat
> has used nothing but.

Speaking of old cats, I had a terrible experience with clumping litters
and my 17 year old cat. She was very ill with CRF at the time, so
couldn't move out of the box very fast. Anyway, she got some of the
clumping litter stuck between her toes. I tried wiping it off, soaking
her paws, etc., but it was on there like cement. Finally ended up
having to use small cuticle scissors to cut it out from between her
toes. I swore after that to never use that stuff again. These days
we're using Swheat Scoop. I've also used Cat Country Organic and
another natural one which name escapes me now.

Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe

February 18th 06, 10:03 AM
Toni wrote:
> > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > Besides the obvious health concerns with the clumping agent, these kinds
> > of litters have harmful silica dust that your cat and you inhale that
> > damages breathing surfaces permanently and is also a known carcinogen.
> > Several years before I educated myself on this matter, I had a cat die
> > from the effects of clumping litter in her system and it was a slow and
> > painful death that I will feel guilty about for the rest of my life.
>
> Any documentation as to cause of death?
>
> I ask not to be rude, but sincerely want to know. I have heard these things
> about clumping litter before but always in an anecdotal sense. My feline
> specialist says it is not a valid concern, the Tufts cat newsletter reported
> the same thing, and I have yet to be able to find any documented cases.

http://www.cah.com/dr_library/litter.html
"On the other hand, Dr. Amy Marder, animal behaviorist and clinical
assistant professor at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine,
has heard stories from veterinarians and veterinary technicians about
cases where (they believe) clumping litter caused a problem. "But these
cases are rare and anecdotal," says Dr. Marder. "No one has collected
the data." "

Why not search the National Library of Medicine for any articles about
litter and clay? Myself, I'm not pleased with bentonite and stuff. But
if clay is completely harmless, I would like to know. In the meantime I
use SwheatScoop which is wheat based.

Theoretically, bentonite can clog up a system, human or feline if not
careful. It can be dangerous. Actually, it's not so theoretical but is
a possible problem with those interested in cleansing their colons.
Since cats are not water loving, this could be a problem. But how much
can a cat eat cleaning paws?

Here's a summary that sounds pretty reasonable:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/post?hl=en&inreplyto=8cbab5563bf00093&reply_to=group&_done=%2Fgroup%2Frec.pets.cats.health%2Bbehav%2Fbr owse_frm%2Fthread%2Fb0f2b8806d9fd173%2F1661529beed ce970%3Flnk%3Darm%26hl%3Den%26

"The one article sure to be cited is one that appeared in "tiger tribe"
magazine a few years ago warning of the dangers of clumping litter, and
it's being responsible for the death of several kittens. The author
says that the vet told her the litter was responsible for the deaths.
What the people who cite this article don't ever say is that in the
very next issue, the woman's vet wrote a letter to the editor saying
she had been misquoted, it wasn't so much that the litter caused the
death as much as it was a contributing factor in the subsequent death
of already sick kittens. I personally have not seen any problems (in my
own cats or clients cats/kittens), nor have any of the vets I know
personally or have heard at the seminars I've attended, nor have I seen
anything in the journals or trade magazines.
About a year ago, the U-Illinois Vet School did a literature search and
did not find any published information to support that it is a danger.
So, is it a problem? As to obstructing intestines and causing
death...I'm skeptical and maybe I've just been lucky, but I haven't
seen any evidence to change my opinion, but I certainly would change my
opinion if there is anything substantiated. Anything I've heard to date
is anecdotal and again, seems to tie in with that one article. I DO
feel that it is dustier, and many of my allergic/asthmatic cats have
more respiratory problems when using it. Basically, do what you are
comfortable with.

James Richards, DVM Director, Cornell Feline Health Center
in the March 1998 issue of Ca****ch,
the Cornell University of Veterinary Medicine
Newsletter for Cat People