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View Full Version : Just adopted a Cat, but he's not eating... Help Please...


Go Red Sox
February 12th 06, 11:27 PM
I adopted a cat from a local shelter on Friday. He is a black short
hair and is about 5 yrs old. He was brought to the shelter with another
cat because the owners girlfriend was allergic. Neptune (my cat's name)
was brought in with another cat who was adopted out before him. They
were caged together until the other one was adopted and Neptune was then
in a single cat cage.

So Friday I brought him home. I expected that at first he would take
some time to adjust. But he still is not eating.

I live with my wife and our 3 kids. They are 6 yrs (girl), 5 yrs (boy)
and 10 months (girl). I have no other animals. I did have a cat which
because of health problems had to be put down back in November. That is
a long story. Anyway, I made it very clear to the kids that they need
to give him space for a little while till he becomes more comfortable.
The two older kids have done a pretty good job of leaving him alone.
And when they approach him, he seems to react just fine to them. He
lets them pet him. However, he seems to be a little bit intimidated by
the 10 month old. He will go near her and even let her pet him. But
when she gets loud (as most little kids do) he runs away. He has been
very affectionate with my wife and me. When he does come out, he will
sit next to us on the couch. He will sit on our laps for a little bit
too. He has come into bed with us, where he will spend some time. He
loves to be pet, even giving us his belly to rub. He is a sweet boy.

The first day Neptune came home he hid under a table. I expected that.
He would come out every once and a while to look around. And when he
would come out, I would show him where his litter box and food/water
would be. He used the litter box to do #1 and #2. He also drank a
little water, but did not eat the wet or dry food I put down for him. I
used the same wet and dry food the shelter used. The next day he became
a little more bold and came out more often. Again, he used the litter
box. But he did not drink (not that I saw) or eat. Today though, he is
doing more hiding than venturing around the house. I am becoming more
concerned with his lack of will to eat. So I gave him a little bit of
tuna fish in hopes that he might eat it. He ate a bite or two, but then
lost interest. The other food he seems to have no interest at all.

Considering he is not eating, how long should I give him until I take
him to the vet? I know it's not healthy for cats to not eat for
extended periods of time. But how long is too long? Does anyone have
any suggestions for me?

Thank you

MaryL
February 12th 06, 11:57 PM
"Go Red Sox" > wrote in message
...
>I adopted a cat from a local shelter on Friday. He is a black short
> hair and is about 5 yrs old. He was brought to the shelter with another
> cat because the owners girlfriend was allergic. Neptune (my cat's name)
> was brought in with another cat who was adopted out before him. They
> were caged together until the other one was adopted and Neptune was then
> in a single cat cage.
>
> So Friday I brought him home. I expected that at first he would take
> some time to adjust. But he still is not eating.
>
> I live with my wife and our 3 kids. They are 6 yrs (girl), 5 yrs (boy)
> and 10 months (girl). I have no other animals. I did have a cat which
> because of health problems had to be put down back in November. That is
> a long story. Anyway, I made it very clear to the kids that they need
> to give him space for a little while till he becomes more comfortable.
> The two older kids have done a pretty good job of leaving him alone.
> And when they approach him, he seems to react just fine to them. He
> lets them pet him. However, he seems to be a little bit intimidated by
> the 10 month old. He will go near her and even let her pet him. But
> when she gets loud (as most little kids do) he runs away. He has been
> very affectionate with my wife and me. When he does come out, he will
> sit next to us on the couch. He will sit on our laps for a little bit
> too. He has come into bed with us, where he will spend some time. He
> loves to be pet, even giving us his belly to rub. He is a sweet boy.
>
> The first day Neptune came home he hid under a table. I expected that.
> He would come out every once and a while to look around. And when he
> would come out, I would show him where his litter box and food/water
> would be. He used the litter box to do #1 and #2. He also drank a
> little water, but did not eat the wet or dry food I put down for him. I
> used the same wet and dry food the shelter used. The next day he became
> a little more bold and came out more often. Again, he used the litter
> box. But he did not drink (not that I saw) or eat. Today though, he is
> doing more hiding than venturing around the house. I am becoming more
> concerned with his lack of will to eat. So I gave him a little bit of
> tuna fish in hopes that he might eat it. He ate a bite or two, but then
> lost interest. The other food he seems to have no interest at all.
>
> Considering he is not eating, how long should I give him until I take
> him to the vet? I know it's not healthy for cats to not eat for
> extended periods of time. But how long is too long? Does anyone have
> any suggestions for me?
>
> Thank you
>

It is likely that Neptune is still nervous in his new environment. It would
be a good idea to confine him in a single room for a few days until he gets
his bearings. Place a litter box, food and water, and lots of toys in the
room. He may be more comfortable eating the first few days if he know he
will not be disturbed. Turn on the radio, tuned to classical or easy
listending music. Spend some time in the room sitting in a chair reading or
watching TV, or sit on the floor and see if he comes to you. Don't insist
on it, though, or try to force your company on him. He will come around,
but it takes time. Be especially alert for your youngest child. Children
of that age should not be left alone with a cat until you are sure that she
will not to pull Neptune's hair or his tail -- and I say that both for her
sake and for Neptune's well-being.

As to the vet: I think Neptune should be taken to a vet immediately for a
basic checkup and routine shots, but that has nothing to do with his not
eating. This should be done for every new cat. If he hasn't been neutered,
arrangements should be made for that ASAP.

Good luck! I'm sure you will soon find that Neptune is easing into your
household.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

MaryL
February 12th 06, 11:58 PM
"Go Red Sox" > wrote in message
...
>I adopted a cat from a local shelter on Friday. He is a black short
> hair and is about 5 yrs old. He was brought to the shelter with another
> cat because the owners girlfriend was allergic. Neptune (my cat's name)
> was brought in with another cat who was adopted out before him. They
> were caged together until the other one was adopted and Neptune was then
> in a single cat cage.
>
> So Friday I brought him home. I expected that at first he would take
> some time to adjust. But he still is not eating.
>
> I live with my wife and our 3 kids. They are 6 yrs (girl), 5 yrs (boy)
> and 10 months (girl). I have no other animals. I did have a cat which
> because of health problems had to be put down back in November. That is
> a long story. Anyway, I made it very clear to the kids that they need
> to give him space for a little while till he becomes more comfortable.
> The two older kids have done a pretty good job of leaving him alone.
> And when they approach him, he seems to react just fine to them. He
> lets them pet him. However, he seems to be a little bit intimidated by
> the 10 month old. He will go near her and even let her pet him. But
> when she gets loud (as most little kids do) he runs away. He has been
> very affectionate with my wife and me. When he does come out, he will
> sit next to us on the couch. He will sit on our laps for a little bit
> too. He has come into bed with us, where he will spend some time. He
> loves to be pet, even giving us his belly to rub. He is a sweet boy.
>
> The first day Neptune came home he hid under a table. I expected that.
> He would come out every once and a while to look around. And when he
> would come out, I would show him where his litter box and food/water
> would be. He used the litter box to do #1 and #2. He also drank a
> little water, but did not eat the wet or dry food I put down for him. I
> used the same wet and dry food the shelter used. The next day he became
> a little more bold and came out more often. Again, he used the litter
> box. But he did not drink (not that I saw) or eat. Today though, he is
> doing more hiding than venturing around the house. I am becoming more
> concerned with his lack of will to eat. So I gave him a little bit of
> tuna fish in hopes that he might eat it. He ate a bite or two, but then
> lost interest. The other food he seems to have no interest at all.
>
> Considering he is not eating, how long should I give him until I take
> him to the vet? I know it's not healthy for cats to not eat for
> extended periods of time. But how long is too long? Does anyone have
> any suggestions for me?
>
> Thank you
>

It is likely that Neptune is still nervous in his new environment. It would
be a good idea to confine him in a single room for a few days until he gets
his bearings. Place a litter box, food and water, and lots of toys in the
room. He may be more comfortable eating the first few days if he know he
will not be disturbed. Turn on the radio, tuned to classical or easy
listending music. Spend some time in the room sitting in a chair reading or
watching TV, or sit on the floor and see if he comes to you. Don't insist
on it, though, or try to force your company on him. He will come around,
but it takes time. Be especially alert for your youngest child. Children
of that age should not be left alone with a cat until you are sure that she
will not to pull Neptune's hair or his tail -- and I say that both for her
sake and for Neptune's well-being.

As to the vet: I think Neptune should be taken to a vet immediately for a
basic checkup and routine shots, but that has nothing to do with his not
eating. This should be done for every new cat. If he hasn't been neutered,
arrangements should be made for that ASAP.

Good luck! I'm sure you will soon find that Neptune is easing into your
household.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

Janna via CatKB.com
February 13th 06, 12:08 AM
>Considering he is not eating, how long should I give him until I take
>him to the vet? I know it's not healthy for cats to not eat for
>extended periods of time. But how long is too long? Does anyone have
>any suggestions for me?

It only takes a few days for a cat (especially an overweight one) to develop
hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver disease). A cat should never stop eating for
longer than 2 days before vet is called. Try anything you can - Fancy Feast
in the can is tasty to a lot of cats, chicken baby food, canned salmon,
sardines, just anything to get him eating. He needs a quiet room for now,
not the run of the house. Put his litter box in there and his food (but not
near the box). Go in and sit with him quietly maybe one or two at a time,
except for the young one for the time being. If he's going to the bathroom
he must be eating or drinking something. Call vet if in doubt.

Janna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

February 13th 06, 12:51 AM
Hi have been working with animals myentire adult life and have come
across some that stuffed vets. you said he was with another when he was
brought in don't put that out of thought for i have seen animals stop
eating for the loss of another. The cats should have been placed
togther they just lost their home now each other. but the problem is
your little one, i have had some that wouldn't eat for anything, except
fish, it was the one thing that i have been able to use to get both
domestic and wild cats to eat again, wether due to illness or saddness.
simple enough fish, water in a pot take out the bones , canned will
work. and by all means make sure there isn't a medical problem. Where i
live the shelter aren't aloud to place sick animals without your
knowledge. he/she has gone through a lot lost family ,friend, now in
new suroundings it affects animals alot especially the older ones,love
and understanding, patience.Good luck to you and yours.

February 13th 06, 12:55 AM
Oh and forgot to mention Jenna nailed this one the litter box check it.
if there is somethig in it you know he is at least drinking or eating
small amounts.

Rhonda
February 13th 06, 01:30 AM
I think it would be a good idea, as someone suggested, to give him a
safe area -- a room of his own. Let him relax a little without being
bothered.

He does need to eat right away as you know, so I would go out and buy
other kinds of cat food. Maybe buy several different canned foods to
tempt him. Pro Plan makes one that has sardines and other stinky fish in
it, which we used when our ill cat stopped eating.

I'm glad you adopted him, but I can't believe they adopted out his
partner. He must be going through a really tough time. It sounds like
you have the patience to work with him.

Let us know what happens.

Rhonda

Go Red Sox wrote:

> I adopted a cat from a local shelter on Friday. He is a black short
> hair and is about 5 yrs old. He was brought to the shelter with another
> cat because the owners girlfriend was allergic. Neptune (my cat's name)
> was brought in with another cat who was adopted out before him. They
> were caged together until the other one was adopted and Neptune was then
> in a single cat cage.
>
> So Friday I brought him home. I expected that at first he would take
> some time to adjust. But he still is not eating.
>
> I live with my wife and our 3 kids. They are 6 yrs (girl), 5 yrs (boy)
> and 10 months (girl). I have no other animals. I did have a cat which
> because of health problems had to be put down back in November. That is
> a long story. Anyway, I made it very clear to the kids that they need
> to give him space for a little while till he becomes more comfortable.
> The two older kids have done a pretty good job of leaving him alone.
> And when they approach him, he seems to react just fine to them. He
> lets them pet him. However, he seems to be a little bit intimidated by
> the 10 month old. He will go near her and even let her pet him. But
> when she gets loud (as most little kids do) he runs away. He has been
> very affectionate with my wife and me. When he does come out, he will
> sit next to us on the couch. He will sit on our laps for a little bit
> too. He has come into bed with us, where he will spend some time. He
> loves to be pet, even giving us his belly to rub. He is a sweet boy.
>
> The first day Neptune came home he hid under a table. I expected that.
> He would come out every once and a while to look around. And when he
> would come out, I would show him where his litter box and food/water
> would be. He used the litter box to do #1 and #2. He also drank a
> little water, but did not eat the wet or dry food I put down for him. I
> used the same wet and dry food the shelter used. The next day he became
> a little more bold and came out more often. Again, he used the litter
> box. But he did not drink (not that I saw) or eat. Today though, he is
> doing more hiding than venturing around the house. I am becoming more
> concerned with his lack of will to eat. So I gave him a little bit of
> tuna fish in hopes that he might eat it. He ate a bite or two, but then
> lost interest. The other food he seems to have no interest at all.
>
> Considering he is not eating, how long should I give him until I take
> him to the vet? I know it's not healthy for cats to not eat for
> extended periods of time. But how long is too long? Does anyone have
> any suggestions for me?
>
> Thank you
>
>

Janna via CatKB.com
February 13th 06, 04:05 AM
>I did forget to mention that I have been giving him Pounce Cat treats.
>I have only given him a couple, but he ate every one I have offered him.
>I don't want him to only eat those since they are meant to be treats,
>not a meal. I have given them to him after he went to the bathroom,
>like a reward. What ever the case, he does eat them.

Good, better than nothing. You could also try breaking up the Pounce into
little pieces and mixing them into some of his dry food. When he starts to
eat the pieces of treats he may start eating the kibbles along with them,
although some of them are very good at just picking out what they like.
Worth a shot though.

Janna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

Barb
February 13th 06, 04:24 PM
That's sad and maybe I'm crazy, but I would contact the adoption place and
ask them if you could contact the new owner of the cat who was with yours.
If I could I would try to see if they would let me have the other cat or
maybe they'd take mine.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

chas
February 13th 06, 07:42 PM
It's admirable that you want to adopt a cat but I would have thought having
such very young, and undoubtedly gorgeous but boisterous/exicteable children
would be a nightmare for any new cat to contend with, especially if it has
not grown up with the children.

The poor thing is probably scared stiff and wishing he was back in a
peaceful cattery.

This is not meant to sound nasty and I'm sorry if it does - but cats and
such young children are not normally a good combination.

Hopefully it'll all work out.

good luck

chas

February 13th 06, 08:46 PM
I have lots to say about the unwanted , lost , forgoten adult animals
that get left at shelters but well i get very opinionated. ever think
of what happens to the animals that sit there day after day month after
month they can only keep them so long.

Good job anyone how has found it has worked in their life to adopt an
adult animal, it takes a lot more patience than a baby, but the reward
of unconditional love and a companion is well worth it.

February 13th 06, 08:48 PM
how is your cat doing?

February 14th 06, 03:27 AM
chas wrote:
> It's admirable that you want to adopt a cat but I would have thought having
> such very young, and undoubtedly gorgeous but boisterous/exicteable children
> would be a nightmare for any new cat to contend with, especially if it has
> not grown up with the children.
>
> The poor thing is probably scared stiff and wishing he was back in a
> peaceful cattery.
>
> This is not meant to sound nasty and I'm sorry if it does - but cats and
> such young children are not normally a good combination.
>

Don't we have enough cats and dogs in shelters because people think
they have to give them up to have a baby?

Can you imagine how many more animals would lose homes if all families
with children under 2 years of age suddenly gave up their cats and
dogs?

Why do so many people think it is a bad idea? Do they not know how to
supervise or separate? Is it so hard to make a safe place that a cat
can retreat to that a dog or smild child cannot reach? Is it so hard to
keep a dog away from a toddler when a toddler should be supervised at
all times anyway?

How do we expect to raise the next generation to be kind to animals and
think of them as permanent members of the family, rather than
disposable, if we believe that kids and animals do not mix?

I am so glad that my parents never believed it was a problem. They had
dogs and cats before I was born (before my older brother and sister
too), and that is how we ended up with 3 kids who all love animals. We
grew up with them.

NanCe via CatKB.com
February 14th 06, 04:31 AM
>The poor thing is probably scared stiff and wishing he was back in a
>peaceful cattery.

Doubt that - catteries are noisy and stressful. Many, many more people there
than a family of 5. And that 2 x 4 cage I'm sure he doesn't miss.

Parents can supervise and teach children about kindness to animals. The more
kids who have pets, the more people who will grow up loving animals. These
parents have already told the kids they need to give him space for now so
they're doing a great job.

NanCe

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com