PDA

View Full Version : Wild cat


DeeC
February 15th 06, 03:12 PM
My sister works for a person who captures stray cats outside his work
place, takes them to get spayed or neutered then releases them back.
This 1 year old he decided to keep and my sister fell in love with it.
He gave it to her. She took it home to try to domesticate it. That was
2 weeks ago. No change. They are keeping it in a closed room. It is
drinking and eating and using the litter box.They go in the room
periodically and talk to her in soothing tones but have not tried to
pick it up. Can anyone give us some advice like: How long will it take,
what else should they do, can it even be domesticated?Thanks so much.
DeeC

Gail
February 15th 06, 03:21 PM
The cat can be domesticated but it will take a long time and much patience.
They should try sitting quietly in the room with her while she is eating. Do
not attempt to touch her or pick her up. They need to gain her trust which
will take time and patience. Also, they can buy those feathers on a wand and
try to engage her in interactive play. I had a feral cat and it took about a
year for me to be able to pet her and pick her up.
Gail
"DeeC" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My sister works for a person who captures stray cats outside his work
> place, takes them to get spayed or neutered then releases them back.
> This 1 year old he decided to keep and my sister fell in love with it.
> He gave it to her. She took it home to try to domesticate it. That was
> 2 weeks ago. No change. They are keeping it in a closed room. It is
> drinking and eating and using the litter box.They go in the room
> periodically and talk to her in soothing tones but have not tried to
> pick it up. Can anyone give us some advice like: How long will it take,
> what else should they do, can it even be domesticated?Thanks so much.
> DeeC
>

February 15th 06, 04:13 PM
Feral cats need a lot of time and patience to tame. Soothing tones,
non-threatening body stance and coming down to the cat's level (low to
the ground) are good ideas. Feather toys may be too scary at first.
Try a ball with a bell in it or a turbo-chaser at first. Give the cat
a toy mouse. Stay away from catnip until you can touch the cat.

Let the cat come to you, don't harrie the cat. Be prepared to be
bitten and clawed. Never corner the cat or threaten it or all the good
work you have done will be gone - and these cats have long memories for
any abuse! It might take you twice as long the next time.

John Doe
February 15th 06, 06:39 PM
morgenmarshall hotmail.com wrote:

>
> Let the cat come to you, don't harrie the cat. Be prepared to be
> bitten and clawed. Never corner the cat or threaten it or all the
> good work you have done will be gone - and these cats have long
> memories for any abuse! It might take you twice as long the next
> time.

But in fact, cats forgive and forget quickly.






>
>
>
>
>
> Path: newssvr25.news.prodigy.net!newsdbm05.news.prodigy. com!newsdbm04.news.prodigy.com!newsdst01.news.prod igy.com!newsmst01b.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.com!ne wscon02.news.prodigy.com!prodigy.net!nx01.iad01.ne wshosting.com!newshosting.com!198.186.190.247.MISM ATCH!news-out.readnews.com!news-xxxfer.readnews.com!postnews.google.com!g14g2000cw a.googlegroups.com!not-for-mail
> From: morgenmarshall hotmail.com
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: Wild cat
> Date: 15 Feb 2006 08:13:42 -0800
> Organization: http://groups.google.com
> Lines: 11
> Message-ID: <1140020022.579255.47990 g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>
> References: <1140016378.793203.248020 o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com> <zFHIf.609$VI6.149 newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>
> NNTP-Posting-Host: 65.6.19.199
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> X-Trace: posting.google.com 1140020028 29851 127.0.0.1 (15 Feb 2006 16:13:48 GMT)
> X-Complaints-To: groups-abuse google.com
> NNTP-Posting-Date: Wed, 15 Feb 2006 16:13:48 +0000 (UTC)
> In-Reply-To: <zFHIf.609$VI6.149 newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net>
> User-Agent: G2/0.2
> X-HTTP-UserAgent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows 98; .NET CLR 1.1.4322),gzip(gfe),gzip(gfe)
> Complaints-To: groups-abuse google.com
> Injection-Info: g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com; posting-host=65.6.19.199; posting-account=A-A4XQ0AAABLvcZnHZP9-keU83BxWT-o
> Xref: prodigy.net rec.pets.cats.health+behav:423807
>

NMR
February 15th 06, 06:52 PM
"John Doe" >

BEWARE HE IS A STALKER AND A TROLL BEWARE FOLLOWS YOU TO OTHER GROUPS AND
INSULTS THEM AND POST BS ABOUT THEM

HE NEEDS A TASTE OF HIS OWN MEDICINE

Rhonda
February 15th 06, 09:09 PM
She'll have to spend lots of time in the room with the cat. Have her
take a book and sit in there and read. The more time she's in there --
the better. It helps to talk to the cat like she's doing, too.

Food works wonders too. Have her throw threats to him without getting
too close. He needs to know that she gives him good things.

When she thinks he's tolerating her in there, she can scoot a little
closer and read. Don't continually make eye contact, it can sometimes be
interpreted as a threat.

When she's close enough, have her throw some good treats to him (like
real chicken,) then try to hand him a piece. It's a major sign of trust
when he eventually takes a piece of food from her hand.

Later after that, she can try to touch him and pet his back.

It takes a lot of time, it could take several weeks yet, but it's so
rewarding when they start to trust.

That's great that she's helping this cat.

Rhonda

DeeC wrote:

> My sister works for a person who captures stray cats outside his work
> place, takes them to get spayed or neutered then releases them back.
> This 1 year old he decided to keep and my sister fell in love with it.
> He gave it to her. She took it home to try to domesticate it. That was
> 2 weeks ago. No change. They are keeping it in a closed room. It is
> drinking and eating and using the litter box.They go in the room
> periodically and talk to her in soothing tones but have not tried to
> pick it up. Can anyone give us some advice like: How long will it take,
> what else should they do, can it even be domesticated?Thanks so much.
> DeeC
>
>

NanCe via CatKB.com
February 15th 06, 09:49 PM
>My sister works for a person who captures stray cats outside his work
>place, takes them to get spayed or neutered then releases them back.
>This 1 year old he decided to keep and my sister fell in love with it.
>He gave it to her. She took it home to try to domesticate it. That was
>2 weeks ago. No change. They are keeping it in a closed room. It is
>drinking and eating and using the litter box.They go in the room

Yes, they can be domesticated but it takes awhile. Some may always be
nervous pets but still will be good pets. Tell her to put on some *soothing*
music in the room also, a radio perhaps, quietly though as a feral won't be
used to it. When your sister looks at him, tell her to close her eyes very
slowly, then slowly open them again and repeat a few times. This is very non-
threatening to them and shows friendliness. Of course, lots of good food
helps too, a full belly will make him more sendentary (just in the beginning
please - too much food later might lead to weight gain). From my experience,
some ferals think a toy mouse is the real thing and will eat the tail, etc.
so might want to be careful with the toys. Remember, they have no experience
with playing; cats living outside have to spend most of their time hunting to
survive. To rescue and tame a feral cat will be a very rewarding experience
for her; what a great person for doing this.

NanCe

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

Phil P.
February 16th 06, 05:34 PM
"DeeC" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My sister works for a person who captures stray cats outside his work
> place, takes them to get spayed or neutered then releases them back.
> This 1 year old he decided to keep and my sister fell in love with it.
> He gave it to her. She took it home to try to domesticate it. That was
> 2 weeks ago. No change. They are keeping it in a closed room. It is
> drinking and eating and using the litter box.They go in the room
> periodically and talk to her in soothing tones but have not tried to
> pick it up. Can anyone give us some advice like: How long will it take,
> what else should they do, can it even be domesticated?Thanks so much.
> DeeC

I have two former ferals that I trapped at 6 and 8 months old. The 6
month-old is now 12 years old and the 8 month-old is now 6. The 6 month-old
took about 3 months to settle in and the 8 month old took about a year.
Usually, but not always, the older the cat the longer it takes to tame.
However, individual personality and experience with humans as well as
genetics play a large roll
in the taming process.

Its very important that your sister doesn't force herself on the cat or try
to rush the taming process. Let the cat come to her on her terms.

Phil

Ron Herfurth
February 16th 06, 09:13 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> She'll have to spend lots of time in the room with the cat. Have her
> take a book and sit in there and read. The more time she's in there --
> the better. It helps to talk to the cat like she's doing, too.
>
> Food works wonders too. Have her throw threats to him without getting
> too close.

Threats are one way but treats work so much better.

lol
ron

Rhonda
February 17th 06, 04:48 AM
Ron Herfurth wrote:

> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>She'll have to spend lots of time in the room with the cat. Have her
>>take a book and sit in there and read. The more time she's in there --
>>the better. It helps to talk to the cat like she's doing, too.
>>
>>Food works wonders too. Have her throw threats to him without getting
>>too close.
>>
>
> Threats are one way but treats work so much better.
>
> lol
> ron


Oh boy, was that Freudian or what? :)

Rhonda