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TerraCanis
February 15th 06, 10:30 PM
"Fluff" is kind of my step-cat - she's about 14 now, recently diagnosed with
hyperthyroidism and a couple of infected teeth. After a week on antibiotics
she had the teeth removed on Monday.

She took quite a long time coming round from the anasthetic, and was quite
unsteady on her feet at first. The vet checked her out yesterday (Tuesday)
and everything seemed OK - he did say that all cats respond differently to
anasthesia (and that the same cat can respond differently to the same
anasthesia on different occasions)

Since then she's been subdues and quiet, and "not really herself". She
seems to be eating and drinking normally and reacting to movement and sound.
She's also walking around at floor level, but slowly, and not jumping up on
chairs as she normally does, and she's far less vocal than usual. On the
plus side, though, she has just climbed the stairs for the first time in two
days, so she does seem to be gradually improving.

I'm aware that we might be expecting too much of poor Fluff - after all, if
I'd just been knocked out and had two molars pulled, I doubt that I'd be
either active or talkative, but it's a bit of a worry all the same.

Does anyone here have similar experiences that might suggest whether this is
within the normal range?

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Anna via CatKB.com
February 15th 06, 11:00 PM
>She took quite a long time coming round from the anasthetic, and was quite
>unsteady on her feet at first. The vet checked her out yesterday (Tuesday)
>and everything seemed OK - he did say that all cats respond differently to
>anasthesia (and that the same cat can respond differently to the same
>anasthesia on different occasions)
>Since then she's been subdues and quiet, and "not really herself". She
>seems to be eating and drinking normally and reacting to movement and sound.
>She's also walking around at floor level, but slowly, and not jumping up on

Two of mine got their teeth done a couple years ago - they were 11 1/2 and 12
at the time. One was fine at the end of the day although still a bit loopy
of course. The other was *very* wobbly (she is half the size of the other -
not sure if that has anything to do with it) and she also has early kidney
disease. They did not have any teeth pulled though. I imagine your cat's
mouth is probably sore; perhaps they do all react differently to the
anesthesia. I gather your cat's kidneys are okay? Also, antibiotics can
make them not feel good too. When one of mine was on them, he got diarreah
as not only do they kill the bad bacteria in the body, but also the good. So
between the antibiotics, the anesthesia, the sore mouth and the fact that she
is a senior, she may just need extra time to recover.

Anna

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February 16th 06, 01:21 AM
TerraCanis wrote:
> "Fluff" is kind of my step-cat - she's about 14 now, recently diagnosed with
> hyperthyroidism and a couple of infected teeth. After a week on antibiotics
> she had the teeth removed on Monday.
>
> She took quite a long time coming round from the anasthetic, and was quite
> unsteady on her feet at first. The vet checked her out yesterday (Tuesday)
> and everything seemed OK - he did say that all cats respond differently to
> anasthesia (and that the same cat can respond differently to the same
> anasthesia on different occasions)
>
> Since then she's been subdues and quiet, and "not really herself". She
> seems to be eating and drinking normally and reacting to movement and sound.
> She's also walking around at floor level, but slowly, and not jumping up on
> chairs as she normally does, and she's far less vocal than usual. On the
> plus side, though, she has just climbed the stairs for the first time in two
> days, so she does seem to be gradually improving.
>
> I'm aware that we might be expecting too much of poor Fluff - after all, if
> I'd just been knocked out and had two molars pulled, I doubt that I'd be
> either active or talkative, but it's a bit of a worry all the same.
>
> Does anyone here have similar experiences that might suggest whether this is
> within the normal range?

Seeing how the cat has been "approved" by the vet, I wouldn't worry too
much. I used to work as a vet tech. Older cats often have a harder
time clearing anesthesia. Since she is eating and drinking I
wouldn't worry too much, though. Did the vet do pre-anesthesia
geriatic blood panel to make sure her organ function was ok prior to
doing the surgery?
FWIW, in an older cat (12 and above, or 10 and above for a cat with a
history of illness) a pre-sed blood panel is almost a requirement.
-L.

Lesley
February 16th 06, 11:46 AM
>
> She took quite a long time coming round from the anasthetic, and was quite
> unsteady on her feet at first. The vet checked her out yesterday (Tuesday)
> and everything seemed OK - he did say that all cats respond differently to
> anasthesia (and that the same cat can respond differently to the same
> anasthesia on different occasions)
>

When we had Fugazi and Isis (Both RB) spayed, Isis was fine within half
an hour of anaesthesia as soon as we got home her big consideration was
food! Fugazi took almost 2 days to get back to normal, the first night
she tried to eat and was sick and spent the night shivering .The next
day she could eat but didn't seem to know where she was some of the
time for example she wandered to her litter tray used it perfectly and
then just sat there half asleep until someone woke her up. She managed
to fall asleep face down in her food dish. By the second day she was
back to normal through.

I'm not sure whether that was an anaesthetic reaction or the fact that
according to the vet they had to give her a double dose of anaesthetic
because she was more trouble than some feral toms

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Anna via CatKB.com
February 16th 06, 05:10 PM
>then just sat there half asleep until someone woke her up. She managed
>to fall asleep face down in her food dish.

Awwwww. Poor little thing. It is funny to see the things they do when
they're drugged up but I also feel bad at the same time when I see them all
messed from anesthesia. One of mine couldn't see where the water was in her
bowl and kept touching it with her paw and then dumping the bowl over. We
had to refill bowl a few times before we finally figured out to just put a
bit in and hold it for her. Too bad they need anesthesia to get their
teeth done.

Anna

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TerraCanis
February 17th 06, 09:07 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...

> Seeing how the cat has been "approved" by the vet, I wouldn't worry too
> much. I used to work as a vet tech. Older cats often have a harder
> time clearing anesthesia. Since she is eating and drinking I
> wouldn't worry too much, though. Did the vet do pre-anesthesia
> geriatic blood panel to make sure her organ function was ok prior to
> doing the surgery?

Yes, she had a full check-up before surgury, and the only problem was the
thyroid (which the vet had picked up in the initial exam anyway - what
prompted the visit was when she stopped eating, presumably because chewing
was too painful.

Thanks to everyone who replied - it was reassuring, and borne out by events.
Fluff is steadily improving, and has just started jumping up on things. We
now think that it's because she was unsteady on her feet when she first came
round and has taken this while to regain her belief that she can do these
things after all.

--
TerraCanis

For email, cut the wossname, and not-me should be djw401