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Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 05:55 AM
Hi,

Just getting a bit concerned about my 15 year old "Q". Recently he has been
unable to keep food down, or water. He will eat or drink but then within
about 20 minutes he sicks it back up. He also dry retches periodically and
nothing comes out aside from a bit of hair and bile. He has always had a
dicky stomach and tended to vomit up the first meal after a rest (overnight
sleep) but this is getting scary and he's lost a lot of weight. He has also
become very affectionate.

The vet could not find any sign of a problem (no lumps and normal
temperature etc) and has pumped him with what I assume are anti-biotics and
steroids which seemed to work immediately afterwards as he kept a meal down
but is back to being sick all over the house now.

He is booked in to have some blood taken for a full bloodwork on Friday
morning but I wonder if anyone can give me an idea what the likely problem
could be? Kidneys? Liver? Cancer? Either way I get a feeling in my bones
he's not long for this earth now.

--

Niel H

John Doe
February 16th 06, 06:00 AM
"Niel Humphreys" >
wrote:

> Just getting a bit concerned about my 15 year old "Q". Recently he
> has been unable to keep food down, or water. He will eat or drink
> but then within about 20 minutes he sicks it back up. He also dry
> retches periodically and nothing comes out aside from a bit of
> hair and bile. He has always had a dicky stomach and tended to
> vomit up the first meal after a rest (overnight sleep) but this is
> getting scary and he's lost a lot of weight. He has also become
> very affectionate.
>
> The vet could not find any sign of a problem (no lumps and normal
> temperature etc) and has pumped him with what I assume are
> anti-biotics and steroids which seemed to work immediately
> afterwards as he kept a meal down but is back to being sick all
> over the house now.

If you have the time, try feeding him a little bit at a time
frequently. Even if you can't do it forever, try it for a few days.
If you do, please report your results.

Good luck.

February 16th 06, 09:31 AM
Niel Humphreys wrote:

> He is booked in to have some blood taken for a full bloodwork on Friday
> morning but I wonder if anyone can give me an idea what the likely problem
> could be? Kidneys? Liver? Cancer? Either way I get a feeling in my bones
> he's not long for this earth now.
>


I just had Kira in for the same thing. Not as bad, she hasn't lost
weight and was keeping some meals down.

My vet said it was probably hairballs. Older cats have a harder time
passing them, so they need extra lubrication. He recommended we try
hairball stuff before doing further tests. (We did do bloodwork as I
wanted to get the geriatric panel anyway, and everything was fine).

She has puked only twice since last Thursday, so major improvement, and
both of those times had some hair,but not as much as previously. So, it
is helping.

She doesn't like the stuff, so I give her a treat afterward to make it
a better experience.

If you haven't tried it already, I'd give it a try and see if it helps.

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 10:26 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Niel Humphreys wrote:
>
>> He is booked in to have some blood taken for a full bloodwork on Friday
>> morning but I wonder if anyone can give me an idea what the likely
>> problem
>> could be? Kidneys? Liver? Cancer? Either way I get a feeling in my bones
>> he's not long for this earth now.
>>
>
>
> I just had Kira in for the same thing. Not as bad, she hasn't lost
> weight and was keeping some meals down.
>
> My vet said it was probably hairballs. Older cats have a harder time
> passing them, so they need extra lubrication. He recommended we try
> hairball stuff before doing further tests. (We did do bloodwork as I
> wanted to get the geriatric panel anyway, and everything was fine).


Hi,

Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine coone
and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's been
getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)
--

Niel H

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 10:30 AM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "Niel Humphreys" >
> wrote:
>
>> Just getting a bit concerned about my 15 year old "Q". Recently he
>> has been unable to keep food down, or water. He will eat or drink
>> but then within about 20 minutes he sicks it back up. He also dry
>> retches periodically and nothing comes out aside from a bit of
>> hair and bile. He has always had a dicky stomach and tended to
>> vomit up the first meal after a rest (overnight sleep) but this is
>> getting scary and he's lost a lot of weight. He has also become
>> very affectionate.
>>
>> The vet could not find any sign of a problem (no lumps and normal
>> temperature etc) and has pumped him with what I assume are
>> anti-biotics and steroids which seemed to work immediately
>> afterwards as he kept a meal down but is back to being sick all
>> over the house now.
>
> If you have the time, try feeding him a little bit at a time
> frequently. Even if you can't do it forever, try it for a few days.
> If you do, please report your results.


Thanks, I free feed my 4 cats so there is always food in a bowl for them
(Hills science plan) so he doesn't really like being given food when I want
him to eat. They get a tin of soft in the mornings & I put a little bowl in
front of him where he was sleeping just now. He woke up, turned his nose up,
got up and puked some bile by the door (caught it on a sheet of A3
fortunately).
--

Niel H

February 16th 06, 11:11 AM
> Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine coone
> and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's been
> getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)
> --

Hmm. Is there anything different about the vomiting, compared to the
previous hairballs?

Does he have any constipation problems?

What tests has the vet done?

February 16th 06, 11:16 AM
>
> Thanks, I free feed my 4 cats so there is always food in a bowl for them
> (Hills science plan) so he doesn't really like being given food when I want
> him to eat. They get a tin of soft in the mornings & I put a little bowl in
> front of him where he was sleeping just now. He woke up, turned his nose up,
> got up and puked some bile by the door (caught it on a sheet of A3
> fortunately).
>

Could he be having acid reflux?

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 11:19 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>> Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine coone
>> and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's been
>> getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)
>> --
>
> Hmm. Is there anything different about the vomiting, compared to the
> previous hairballs?

Nope, just the hair is coming out in little clumps with each vomit instead
of one large one every couple of days. I am wondering if one of these big
hairballs has started to go through the stomach instead of coming back up
and caused a blockage in the intestines or something (gone down too far to
be vomited back up).

> Does he have any constipation problems?

Not that I noticed but he goes outside to do that....except for last night
when there was a large log in the place where he does every now and again
poo inside. :(

> What tests has the vet done?


Preliminary at the moment. Temperature, felt around, listened to heart and
breathing, looked down throat. He said that aside from the symptoms I was
describing everything seemed normal. Advised to see if the steroids and
anti-biotics did anything and if not do full bloodwork in case they are
initial symptoms of a bigger problem that isn't yet obvious.
--

Niel H

Rene S.
February 16th 06, 03:18 PM
Ask your vet about pancreatitis. I just went through this with my
cat--very scary. When he has the bloodwork done, make sure to include
the amalazye and lipase tests too. If they are elevated and the
vomiting continues, this may be a sign of pancreatitis.

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 05:09 PM
"Rene S." > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Ask your vet about pancreatitis. I just went through this with my
> cat--very scary. When he has the bloodwork done, make sure to include
> the amalazye and lipase tests too. If they are elevated and the
> vomiting continues, this may be a sign of pancreatitis.


Thanks, will do in the morning. The vet mentioned having the full battery of
tests so I will ask him if these are included.

I gave him a double dose of his furball medicine this morning and he managed
to keep some food down this afternoon and has just eaten again..... fingers
crossed.
--

Niel H

Anna via CatKB.com
February 16th 06, 05:52 PM
>sleep) but this is getting scary and he's lost a lot of weight. He has also
>become very affectionate.
>He is booked in to have some blood taken for a full bloodwork on Friday
>morning but I wonder if anyone can give me an idea what the likely problem
>could be? Kidneys? Liver? Cancer? Either way I get a feeling in my bones

Loss of weight and vomiting can be signs of kidney disease (one of mine has
it) but with the proper care and special food he can live for *years* with
it; it is not an automatic death sentence. Mine has had it for 4 years now
and is still the same. The blood profile and urinalysis will show if the
kidneys are failing. If that is what is turns out to be here is a really
good UK site:

http://www.felinecrf.org

Anna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

Phil P.
February 16th 06, 06:32 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> >> Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine
coone
> >> and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's
been
> >> getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)


You might want to try giving him the treats a couple 'o few times a day to
keep things moving along.


> >> --
> >
> > Hmm. Is there anything different about the vomiting, compared to the
> > previous hairballs?
>
> Nope, just the hair is coming out in little clumps with each vomit instead
> of one large one every couple of days. I am wondering if one of these big
> hairballs has started to go through the stomach instead of coming back up
> and caused a blockage in the intestines or something (gone down too far to
> be vomited back up).


Could be. Cats don't have "housekeeper contractions"- like dogs do- that
clean out hair and other indigestible material from the digestive track
between meals . So, if the cat's gastric motility is a little on the slow
side hair can accumulate in the intestinal tract faster than in a cat with
normal gastric motility. This is probably why some cats have chronic
hairball problems and others don't. The problem is probably exacerbated if
the cat has long hair and/or grooms other cats.

If I were you, I'd probably opt for x-rays to rule out an obstruction or
partial obstruction.


>
> > Does he have any constipation problems?
>
> Not that I noticed but he goes outside to do that....except for last night
> when there was a large log in the place where he does every now and again
> poo inside. :(


Unsupervised access to the outdoors really complicates monitoring a cat's
elimination behavior and the diagnosis and treatment of medical problems.
You might want to think about keeping him inside for a few days so you can
monitor him more closely.

Good luck,

Phil

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 06:37 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> >
>> >> Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine
> coone
>> >> and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's
> been
>> >> getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)
>
>
> You might want to try giving him the treats a couple 'o few times a day to
> keep things moving along.

Already on that, he's had them twice today and yesterday. Today he's managed
to keep 2 meals down and only puked when he first woke up this morning.

> Unsupervised access to the outdoors really complicates monitoring a cat's
> elimination behavior and the diagnosis and treatment of medical problems.
> You might want to think about keeping him inside for a few days so you can
> monitor him more closely.

He'd go up the wall (normally) but since he became ill has not gone outside
for quite a few days. That would also present a problem with my second
oldest cat who, if he can't get out, he will just eliminate there and then
by the door. The 2 kittens are very well behaved though. :)

> Good luck,


Thanks Phil. I just had a good look at the site Anna posted and he does seem
to have a lot of the symptoms of CRF, I imagine this will show in his
bloodwork.
--

Niel H

John Doe
February 16th 06, 07:31 PM
"Niel Humphreys" <admin sznzozwzdzoznzczozmzpzuztzezrzs.co.uk>
wrote:

> "John Doe" <jdoe usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message

>>>
>>> The vet could not find any sign of a problem (no lumps and
>>> normal temperature etc) and has pumped him with what I assume
>>> are anti-biotics and steroids which seemed to work immediately
>>> afterwards as he kept a meal down but is back to being sick all
>>> over the house now.
>>
>> If you have the time, try feeding him a little bit at a time
>> frequently. Even if you can't do it forever, try it for a few
>> days. If you do, please report your results.
>
>
> Thanks, I free feed my 4 cats so there is always food in a bowl
> for them (Hills science plan) so he doesn't really like being
> given food when I want him to eat.

How does his preference have anything to do with you trying to stop
his frequent barfing?

>
> They get a tin of soft in the mornings & I put a little bowl in
> front of him where he was sleeping just now. He woke up, turned
> his nose up, got up and puked some bile by the door (caught it on
> a sheet of A3 fortunately).

At the slightest sign, I can wake up from a dead sleep, grab a
Styrofoam plate, and get to where my cat is going to barf.

Your experience sounded exactly like mine, including multiple cats
and free feeding (or feeding a lot at one time. Feeding my cat very small amounts frequently
appears to be working. About one more week of trial and
that will prove it. Too bad you have twice as many cats.







> --
>
> Niel H
>
>
>
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> Subject: Re: Cat repeatedly vomiting?
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February 16th 06, 07:56 PM
Niel Humphreys wrote:
> > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> >> Thanks for the advice but we've already been there. He's half maine coone
> >> and has always had hairball problems. for the last 2 or 3 years he's been
> >> getting hairball paste on a few treats every other day. :)
> >> --
> >
> > Hmm. Is there anything different about the vomiting, compared to the
> > previous hairballs?
>
> Nope, just the hair is coming out in little clumps with each vomit instead
> of one large one every couple of days. I am wondering if one of these big
> hairballs has started to go through the stomach instead of coming back up
> and caused a blockage in the intestines or something (gone down too far to
> be vomited back up).
>

I think that is what was happening with Kira. She had a couple episodes
where she was growling, and she was obviously in pain. It was similar
to a time a few years ago where the vet's exam (massage) solved it, so
I was able to massage her and help her get over it. The first time, she
felt really full. Like an inflated balloon. The second time scared me
because I felt something. She was full, so I felt something that felt
like a ball or large grape. It could have been a hairball trying to
pass. She felt better after the massage, and there was nothing there
when I went to the vet.

So, it could be one hairball is blocking, or partially blocking, the
system, so other food cannot pass. That is probably why Kira was
throwing up. There just wasn't any room in the system. Now that I am
using the hairball stuff, Laxatone, she is doing much better.



> > Does he have any constipation problems?
>
> Not that I noticed but he goes outside to do that....except for last night
> when there was a large log in the place where he does every now and again
> poo inside. :(

Does he get growly or look miserable much? Maybe start feeling his
belly every day. Do a massage slowly along his belly and see it feels
different sometimes. Kira felt fine when I took her to the vet, but she
felt wrong both times that she was growly.


>
> > What tests has the vet done?
>
>
> Preliminary at the moment. Temperature, felt around, listened to heart and
> breathing, looked down throat. He said that aside from the symptoms I was
> describing everything seemed normal. Advised to see if the steroids and
> anti-biotics did anything and if not do full bloodwork in case they are
> initial symptoms of a bigger problem that isn't yet obvious.
> --

I'd get the bloodwork. He;s a senior, so you should get that anyway to
catch stuff early. You might try an x-ray to see if there is a
blockage.

Also, ask about antacids. Both times that I had a dog and cat on
antibiotics, I was told to give them antacids at the same time. It
could be that the medicine is irritating his stomach.

February 16th 06, 08:11 PM
Niel Humphreys wrote:
> "Rene S." > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > Ask your vet about pancreatitis. I just went through this with my
> > cat--very scary. When he has the bloodwork done, make sure to include
> > the amalazye and lipase tests too. If they are elevated and the
> > vomiting continues, this may be a sign of pancreatitis.
>
>
> Thanks, will do in the morning. The vet mentioned having the full battery of
> tests so I will ask him if these are included.
>
> I gave him a double dose of his furball medicine this morning and he managed
> to keep some food down this afternoon and has just eaten again..... fingers
> crossed.

You might just need to keep him at a higher level. My vet had me start
at 3 inches of the stuff out of the tube every day for a few days and
then a few times a week. She's still having a little bit of a problem,
so I have kept her on it every day and will lower the amount.

You mentioned double dose, but I don't know what your regular dose
sizes are. It may be that increasing it is all you need. It sounds like
you are having some improvement with it.

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 08:25 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "Niel Humphreys" <admin sznzozwzdzoznzczozmzpzuztzezrzs.co.uk>
> wrote:
>
>> Thanks, I free feed my 4 cats so there is always food in a bowl
>> for them (Hills science plan) so he doesn't really like being
>> given food when I want him to eat.
>
> How does his preference have anything to do with you trying to stop
> his frequent barfing?

You said try and feed him small bits of food at a time. When food is always
around and he is used to that I can't force feed him when I want him to eat.
Doesn't work with cats. :)

>> They get a tin of soft in the mornings & I put a little bowl in
>> front of him where he was sleeping just now. He woke up, turned
>> his nose up, got up and puked some bile by the door (caught it on
>> a sheet of A3 fortunately).
>
> At the slightest sign, I can wake up from a dead sleep, grab a
> Styrofoam plate, and get to where my cat is going to barf.

All 4 of mine sleep through the night. Q barfs when he wakes up and then
during the day when I am in & out with work. I am rarely around to catch him
but usually come homw to something that needs cleaning up.

Niel H

Niel Humphreys
February 16th 06, 08:31 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Niel Humphreys wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> >
>
> Does he get growly or look miserable much? Maybe start feeling his
> belly every day. Do a massage slowly along his belly and see it feels
> different sometimes. Kira felt fine when I took her to the vet, but she
> felt wrong both times that she was growly.

Lol, Q is the most cantancerous ill tempered cat I have ever come across.
All hiss and wind though, he never actually attacks, just spits a lot. :)
Seriously he has become the opposite lately, extremely affectionate and soft
which he always was with me but now allows other people to stroke him and
lets me pick him up.

> I'd get the bloodwork. He;s a senior, so you should get that anyway to
> catch stuff early.

Yes, I think I will get it done on my other 'oldie' who is 13 just in case
though he is in great health at the moment.

Niel H

John Doe
February 16th 06, 09:40 PM
Margarita Salt > wrote:

> John Doe > wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>
>> At the slightest sign, I can wake up from a dead sleep, grab a
>> Styrofoam plate, and get to where my cat is going to barf.
>
> Kami makes an announcement before she barfs. When I hear that
> particular yowl, I can usually scooch her onto the linoleum, or
> slide newpaper or something under her.

At first, I tried to relocate. I have determined that sliding
something under her barf area is quicker and less traumatic than
grabbing/relocating her. I just have to know where the Styrofoam
plate is located for quick access.

Good luck.

John Doe
February 16th 06, 09:45 PM
"Niel Humphreys" <admin sznzozwzdzoznzczozmzpzuztzezrzs.co.uk>
wrote:

> "John Doe" <jdoe usenet.love.invalid> wrote in message
> news:Xns976C7F5FF7EAEfollydom 207.115.17.102...
>> "Niel Humphreys" <admin sznzozwzdzoznzczozmzpzuztzezrzs.co.uk>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Thanks, I free feed my 4 cats so there is always food in a bowl
>>> for them (Hills science plan) so he doesn't really like being
>>> given food when I want him to eat.
>>
>> How does his preference have anything to do with you trying to
>> stop his frequent barfing?
>
> You said try and feed him small bits of food at a time. When food
> is always around and he is used to that I can't force feed him
> when I want him to eat. Doesn't work with cats. :)

I didn't say anything about force feeding.

It's up to you of course. I realize having four cats makes it more
difficult and maybe even impossible since you are gone during the
day. But I think you're right to be concerned. Vomiting can cause
lung disease, like a reaction to vomit getting into their lungs.

Good luck.





> Niel H
>
>
>
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> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
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February 17th 06, 03:16 AM
Niel Humphreys wrote:

> You said try and feed him small bits of food at a time. When food is always
> around and he is used to that I can't force feed him when I want him to eat.
> Doesn't work with cats. :)
>

I had to do this with Jay Jay when I first got him. He had diarhea from
the food change, so he went on a special diet. I had to remove the
feeders from my bedroom, and close the door to the bathroom where the
other feeders were. The other 3 cats had to get limited access to food
to make sure that Jay Jay only got the special diet.

Later, we determined that one food still bothered Jay Jay, but it is
Chase's favorite. So, we keep that food in one bowl in my nephew's room
where Jay Jay will not go. I also made his food easily available in his
favorite place, so while he has access to 5 kinds, he mostly eats the
one I want him to eat.

I also had to limit the amount for awhile because he was a former stray
and free feeding was too tempting for him. He was gaining weight too
quickly. So, I had to put food in his bowl 2x a time and let it run out
to keep him limited. After several months, I increased the amount in
the bowl and could see the leftovers, so he can free feed now.

If you remove the feeder and just add small amounts to the bowl during
the day, he can still eat when he feels like it, but the amounts will
be limited by the amount available to him.

Phil P.
February 17th 06, 04:20 AM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]


>
> Thanks Phil. I just had a good look at the site Anna posted and he does
seem
> to have a lot of the symptoms of CRF, I imagine this will show in his
> bloodwork.

While you're getting his blood tested, have his T4 and urine checked at the
same time.

P.

Wendy
February 17th 06, 12:45 PM
"Margarita Salt" > wrote in message
...
> John Doe > wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>
>> At the slightest sign, I can wake up from a dead sleep, grab a
>> Styrofoam plate, and get to where my cat is going to barf.
>
> Kami makes an announcement before she barfs. When I hear that
> particular yowl, I can usually scooch her onto the linoleum, or slide
> newpaper or something under her. Funny thing is, she always tries to
> move away from what I have deemed "barfable," like running from the
> kitchent o the living room to do, or backing up so as *not* to get it
> on the peper.
>
> Silly animals. ;)
>
> --
> Margarita Salt
>
> "...practically no one in the world is entirely bad or
> entirely good... motives are often more important than
> actions." -- Eleanore Roosevelt


If mine start gagging in the kitchen they make sure they move into a
carpeted area before they barf.

NanCe via CatKB.com
February 17th 06, 06:31 PM
>If mine start gagging in the kitchen they make sure they move into a
>carpeted area before they barf.

Ain't that the way! One of mine will move off the ceramic floor when she's
about to hurl and run to the hardwood floor because of course watery vomit is
great for wood floors. Another goes into my closet and deposits her
hairballs into my shoes; so courteous of her to keep them off the rug!

NanCe

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Niel Humphreys
February 17th 06, 07:42 PM
Update

Took Q to the vets today. There was a new assistant on duty and true to form
Q did not submit willingly to have a needle inserted so they took him in for
the day so that they could take the sample when the more experienced help
came to work later. Turns out they had to sedate him but while he was under
the vet took an x-ray of his abdomen & said there was absolutely nothing out
of the ordinary showing. Blood tests will be ready on Monday so will see
what they bring up.

In the meantime he hasn't vomited today as well as yesterday (though part of
that is probably due to stress) & vet seems to think it is nothing very
serious....... fingers crossed.

--

Niel H

Anna via CatKB.com
February 18th 06, 12:57 AM
>of the ordinary showing. Blood tests will be ready on Monday so will see
>what they bring up.

You should also have his urine tested. Sometimes the inability to
concentrate the urine well shows up first before anything out of the ordinary
shows up in the blood test for kidney disease. At least 70% of the kidneys
must be destroyed before it shows in the blood test; therefore if, say, 50%
of a cat's kidneys are destroyed, it will not show up in the blood test.

Also, as Phil stated, you should consider a T4 test also. That will check
for hyperthyroidism. That is another condition that older cats with
unexplained weight loss may have. Usually they will eat a lot but still
lose weight and are hyperactive. They may also drink and urinate more and
can have vomiting and diarreah.

>In the meantime he hasn't vomited today as well as yesterday (though part of
>that is probably due to stress) & vet seems to think it is nothing very
>serious....... fingers crossed.

That's good.


Anna

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Niel Humphreys
February 25th 06, 03:46 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> "Phil P." > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>
>
>>
>> Thanks Phil. I just had a good look at the site Anna posted and he does
> seem
>> to have a lot of the symptoms of CRF, I imagine this will show in his
>> bloodwork.
>
> While you're getting his blood tested, have his T4 and urine checked at
> the
> same time.


Q is getting a lot better. The vet found a skin infection along his back
which he's been licking and creating addional hairballs and it looks like
one had got stuck. He is having treatment for that now and hasn't been sick
in over a week & is putting on weight and being happy again.

Sadly it took my eye off my other old boy who has fallen ill and the
prognosis for him doesn't look good.
--

Niel H

Phil P.
February 26th 06, 08:15 AM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> > message ...
> >> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> >> news:[email protected]
> >
> >
> >>
> >> Thanks Phil. I just had a good look at the site Anna posted and he does
> > seem
> >> to have a lot of the symptoms of CRF, I imagine this will show in his
> >> bloodwork.
> >
> > While you're getting his blood tested, have his T4 and urine checked at
> > the
> > same time.
>
>
> Q is getting a lot better. The vet found a skin infection along his back
> which he's been licking and creating addional hairballs and it looks like
> one had got stuck. He is having treatment for that now and hasn't been
sick
> in over a week & is putting on weight and being happy again.
>
> Sadly it took my eye off my other old boy who has fallen ill and the
> prognosis for him doesn't look good.


See my other post. Speak to your vet about a diuretic/nitro/potassium- I
think that will help his breathing.

Phil