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altheim
February 17th 06, 10:02 AM
Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
every two to four days.

When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
in some way.

I'm guessing!

I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
cat food. She sleeps indoors.

Anyone know what's happening?

--
altheim

Wendy
February 17th 06, 12:35 PM
"altheim" > wrote in message
...
> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
> every two to four days.
>
> When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
> that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
> an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
> in some way.
>
> I'm guessing!
>
> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
>
> Anyone know what's happening?
>
> --
> altheim
>
>

Make a vet appointment. If it's a seizure then you need to find out why
she's having them. The vet would know what tests need to be done to find out
if there is an underlying problem causing this symptom. If you just let it
go it could get worse.

W

NMR
February 17th 06, 02:49 PM
Yes what is happening is that you need to take the cat to a vet NOW. What
you just described can be an epileptic episode or a mini stroke. You may
not be able to see anything; poor excuse but blood work shows a lot

On of my cats is epileptic the blood work showed it after I witness a
episode

Rhonda
February 17th 06, 04:01 PM
She needs some tests done at the vet -- blood tests at the very least.

One thing could be that if she is diabetic, which is not uncommon in
older cats, she can have seizures if her blood sugar gets too low.

Think of any other symptoms you might have noticed from what she's
taking in to what is coming out, and if she's been more tired lately, etc.

Hope the vet can find out what's going on.

Rhonda

altheim wrote:

> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
> every two to four days.

cybercat
February 17th 06, 06:25 PM
"altheim" > wrote in message
...
> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
> every two to four days.
>
> When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
> that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
> an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
> in some way.
>
> I'm guessing!
>
> I should take her to the vet

WTF is wrong with you? Jesus. Did you say "squealing in agony?"

You did, didn't you?

Miserable piece of ****.

cybercat
February 17th 06, 06:30 PM
"NMR" > wrote in message
...
> Yes what is happening is that you need to take the cat to a vet NOW.
What
> you just described can be an epileptic episode or a mini stroke. You may
> not be able to see anything; poor excuse but blood work shows a lot
>
> On of my cats is epileptic the blood work showed it after I witness a
> episode
>

My cat had mild seizure-like episodes and we put her on a beta-blocker,
assuming it was heart related. She has never had another as long as we keep
her on the medicine.

The idea that there is no point in taking a cat to the vet since she will
not be seizing while at the vet is one of the most insidious rationales I
have seen for not taking a cat to the vet. Ugh.

-L.
February 17th 06, 07:02 PM
altheim wrote:
> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
> every two to four days.
>
> When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
> that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
> an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
> in some way.
>
> I'm guessing!

Sounds like a seizure. Often cats will vocalize during them. Get her
to the vet asap.
-L.

JJ
February 17th 06, 07:47 PM
There are a number of things that could be happening to your cat. Why
on earth would you spend time posting on a message board when you
should actually be going to a Veterinarian to get professional medical
advise.

JJ
February 17th 06, 07:47 PM
There are a number of things that could be happening to your cat. Why
on earth would you spend time posting on a message board when you
should actually be going to a Veterinarian to get professional medical
advise.

altheim
February 17th 06, 11:06 PM
"cybercat" > wrote:
> "altheim" > wrote:
>> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
>> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
>> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
>> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
>> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
>> every two to four days.
>>
>> When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
>> that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
>> an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
>> in some way.
>>
>> I'm guessing!
>>
>> I should take her to the vet
>
> WTF is wrong with you? Jesus. Did you say "squealing in agony?"
>
> You did, didn't you?
>
> Miserable piece of ****.

Stupid answer. get lost.

--
altheim

altheim
February 17th 06, 11:06 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote:
> She needs some tests done at the vet -- blood tests at the very least.
>
> One thing could be that if she is diabetic, which is not uncommon in older
> cats, she can have seizures if her blood sugar gets too low.
>
> Think of any other symptoms you might have noticed from what she's taking
> in to what is coming out, and if she's been more tired lately, etc.
>
> Hope the vet can find out what's going on.
>
> Rhonda

Thanks Rhonda - folks - of course I will take her to the vet.

I just thought the expertise in this group would have a clue.

--
altheim


>> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
>> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
>> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
>> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
>> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
>> every two to four days.
>

February 18th 06, 12:31 AM
altheim wrote:
> Our cat, now about fourteen years old, has recently started
> having some sort of fit, or attack. Her legs give way, then she
> rolls about threshing and squealing in agony. This lasts for a
> few seconds, but then it seems to be over and she gets up and
> carries on as normal. These fits are now occurring about once
> every two to four days.
>
> When it first happened I suspected heart attack, but if it were
> that I don't think she would be able to scream. It didn't look like
> an epileptic fit to me and a stroke should leave her debilitated
> in some way.
>
> I'm guessing!
>
> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
>
> Anyone know what's happening?

Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.

One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."

So... even if your cat acts perfectly normally while at the vet appt.,
it most likely won't be in vain.

Cathy
>
> --
> altheim

cybercat
February 18th 06, 12:54 AM
"altheim" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Rhonda" > wrote:
> > She needs some tests done at the vet -- blood tests at the very least.
> >
> > One thing could be that if she is diabetic, which is not uncommon in
older
> > cats, she can have seizures if her blood sugar gets too low.
> >
> > Think of any other symptoms you might have noticed from what she's
taking
> > in to what is coming out, and if she's been more tired lately, etc.
> >
> > Hope the vet can find out what's going on.
> >
> > Rhonda
>
> Thanks Rhonda - folks - of course I will take her to the vet.
>
> I just thought the expertise in this group would have a clue.
>

Yeah. The clue is, you should have taken her right to the vet.

Asshole.

-L.
February 18th 06, 01:05 AM
wrote:
>
> Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
>
> One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
> when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
> was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
> at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
> therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."

Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
seizure symptoms...
-L.

February 18th 06, 04:27 AM
altheim wrote:

>
> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
>

Not only can the vet see stuff we don't, they know the right questions
to ask to find out the stuff you saw but didn't realize it.

For example, 8 years ago, I adopted a rescued dog. She had been abused
and was severely messed up. A few months into, I was moving her, and
she yelped. All I had done was put my hands around her middle and try
to move her sideways. A nromal dog would not have yelped.

Knowing she had been abused (and kicked), I figured sh ehad been kicked
hard, and maybe had suffered a broken rib. If so, it had to have
healed, even if poorly, and there wouldn't be anything to do about it
now. But I figured I should get an x-ray and find out, so that I would
know exactly where she was sore and not push there.

The vet knew otherwise. He listened to what I said, and did his own
exam hands on. He noticed that her front leg was stiff on one side (a
symptom), and he hasked me questions. Has she coughed much? Yes. Sounds
like she has a hairball, but she never coughed anything up. (another
symptom). He did the x-ray, but the results were no surprised to him,
only to me.

She had an enlarged heart. Something more common in smaller dogs as
breeders breed down for a smaller version of the breed. Jenny us an
undersized sheltie, and her heart is healthy, but a bit too big for her
body.

Because of this, her heart pushes on her windpipe on a daily basis,
causing her to cough if she exercises too much. Especially if she gains
weight (which she did when I got her). Then teh fat takes up room,and
there is even less room for her organs, so a simple squeeze to move her
over is enough to cause her pain.

We put her on a special diet keep her weight ideal, and she rarely ever
coughs. If she does, I know to check her weight and adjust her diet. I
also have to limit her exercise and stop her when she plays to hard.
And we all know not to squeeze her. No grabbing her body and moving her
over or trying to pull her toward us. And we use a different technique
to pick her up so that she is more comfortable.

I went to the vet that day, thinking it was an old injury with no
treatment. I just wanted to know what it was. I came away knowing my
dog had a serious condition that could be controlled easily, but
*needed* to be controlled, or it could kill her.

Your vet knows a ton more than you do, that's why they studied all this
stuff. They will know what to look for, what to check, and what to ask.

altheim
February 18th 06, 10:01 AM
"-L." > wrote:
> wrote:
>>
>> Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
>>
>> One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
>> when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
>> was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
>> at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
>> therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."
>
> Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
> seizure symptoms...

I'm not quite sure what is meant by 'seizure'. It could mean
anything, yet the Op above, writes it 'Seizure' - in uppercase -
like it means something specific. I'd be sceptical of any vet
who said that. I'd want an explanation.

Anyway, the symptom that stands out in my mind is that
her legs seem to give way - she falls over - and that is
when she begins howling. I wonder if it could be fear
rather than pain? There's no frothing at the mouth, no sign
of breathlessness or anything like that, and it only lasts a
few seconds.

--
altheim

altheim
February 18th 06, 10:15 AM
> wrote:
> altheim wrote:
>>
>> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
>> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
>> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
>> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
>>
>
> Not only can the vet see stuff we don't, they know the right questions
> to ask to find out the stuff you saw but didn't realize it.
>
[snip for brevity]
> I went to the vet that day, thinking it was an old injury with no
> treatment. I just wanted to know what it was. I came away knowing my
> dog had a serious condition that could be controlled easily, but
> *needed* to be controlled, or it could kill her.
>
> Your vet knows a ton more than you do, that's why they studied all this
> stuff. They will know what to look for, what to check, and what to ask.

This isn't in dispute. I coulda just taken the cat to the vet and
not bothered with you guys. What is this group for if not to
talk about cats health and behaviour?

I think I was deeply mistaken about the 'expertise' here.

--
altheim

February 18th 06, 10:20 AM
altheim wrote:
> "-L." > wrote:
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
> >>
> >> One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
> >> when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
> >> was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
> >> at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
> >> therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."
> >
> > Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
> > seizure symptoms...
>
> I'm not quite sure what is meant by 'seizure'. It could mean
> anything, yet the Op above, writes it 'Seizure' - in uppercase -
> like it means something specific. I'd be sceptical of any vet
> who said that. I'd want an explanation.
>
> Anyway, the symptom that stands out in my mind is that
> her legs seem to give way - she falls over - and that is
> when she begins howling. I wonder if it could be fear
> rather than pain? There's no frothing at the mouth, no sign
> of breathlessness or anything like that, and it only lasts a
> few seconds.
>
> --
> altheim

You need to read up on seizures. They come in all sizes and styles. You
are confusing grand mal with petit mal seizures or what you see on the
idiot tube as seizures. Many seizures do not have frothing at the
mouth. And there is not breathlessness either. Where do you get these
ideas? From TV? Please take the time to read up any basic level text on
seizures. I had a cat with seizures and there was never ever any
frothing or breathlessness --- and the treatment is dirt cheap, usually
phenobarbital for cats, not Dilantin which is for dogs, but
phenobarbital. There are more modern medicines but these will do. You
need to remind the vets of this - most vets in my experience do not
know much at all about cats and brains. But it helps to uncover the
cause of seizures, or spells or whatever your cat is undergoing. And
this will take work on your part. Asking in a newsgroup at this point
is sad. But most vets won't have a clue either. So I feel badly for all
concerned. If you can afford it, an x-ray of the skull is usually the
place to start. An MRI is better but? You are looking for an injury as
a start. If not injury, then I don't know what would be the cause,
maybe a tumor? You will need an extremely intelligent vet. There are
vets who specialize in neurology, usually in vet schools. But even the
best vet schools may not have a neurology professor vet. So ask. Do you
have the interest and money to check this out? Sometimes they will take
in the feline and treat for a reduced cost to show the young and quite
inexperienced and clueless student vets. This is painful to watch but
part of the process.

February 18th 06, 10:33 AM
altheim wrote:
> I think I was deeply mistaken about the 'expertise' here.

Read my above post. The treatment is 1/8th grain phenobarbitol twice a
day for idiopathic seizures for cats. Make sure you are trained how to
give a tiny pill to a cat. I found it not difficult but not that simple
either. I just place the pill on the back of her tongue. The cat did
not ever bite or scratch me either which I found surprising. But maybe
she knew I was helping her. Maybe you can put it in food. The pill is
extremely small so easy to deal with.

Before you cast aspersions, you should do some basic reading. From your
comments, you do not know anything about seizures and appear to be
going by what you see in the movies or television. There is expertise
in this newsgroup but you have to bring something to the plate or
table. Just to bring vague and very wrong suppositions will not be good
for your cat or your responses from the newsgroup. If you can up your
knowledge, the responses will increase too.

Most vets won't have the expertise to solve this problem. So fine. I
have given you the cure which is extraordinarily cheap. It won't cure
cure, but if it's a seizure it will stop the cat from having these
terrifying spells, as they used to be called in a different time and
place.

Again, 1/8th grain phenobarbitol, B.I.D., got it? That's the
prescription.

An old drug that you can buy a year's supply for a few dollars.

But you will need to tell the vet's that. If they look it up in their
textbooks, then can verify what I have posted here.

Wendy
February 18th 06, 12:18 PM
"altheim" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote:
>> altheim wrote:
>>>
>>> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
>>> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
>>> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
>>> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
>>>
>>
>> Not only can the vet see stuff we don't, they know the right questions
>> to ask to find out the stuff you saw but didn't realize it.
>>
> [snip for brevity]
>> I went to the vet that day, thinking it was an old injury with no
>> treatment. I just wanted to know what it was. I came away knowing my
>> dog had a serious condition that could be controlled easily, but
>> *needed* to be controlled, or it could kill her.
>>
>> Your vet knows a ton more than you do, that's why they studied all this
>> stuff. They will know what to look for, what to check, and what to ask.
>
> This isn't in dispute. I coulda just taken the cat to the vet and
> not bothered with you guys. What is this group for if not to
> talk about cats health and behaviour?
>
> I think I was deeply mistaken about the 'expertise' here.
>
> --
> altheim
>
>

If you had posted the vet did tests and here are the results you would have
gotten more specific answers. All you posted is that the cat acted
strangely, you suspect maybe it's a seizure but OTOH could be something
else, that it might just be pain and expect someone to diagnose your cat's
problem. The consensus is to take the cat to a vet, explain the symptoms and
let the vet run some basic tests to start. Someone mentioned that diabetes
can cause seizures as well as injuries or neurological disorders. With a 14
yr. old cat some other health problem could be developing that could cause
the symptom you describe. Even if there were a vet posting here regularly,
which there isn't, I don't know any who would diagnose the animal from just
the information you gave.

So have you made the vet appointment yet?

W

altheim
February 18th 06, 02:19 PM
> wrote:
> altheim wrote:
>> "-L." > wrote:
>> > wrote:
>> >>
>> >> Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
>> >>
>> >> One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
>> >> when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
>> >> was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular
>> >> cat
>> >> at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
>> >> therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."
>> >
>> > Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
>> > seizure symptoms...
>>
>> I'm not quite sure what is meant by 'seizure'. It could mean
>> anything, yet the Op above, writes it 'Seizure' - in uppercase -
>> like it means something specific. I'd be sceptical of any vet
>> who said that. I'd want an explanation.
>>
>> Anyway, the symptom that stands out in my mind is that
>> her legs seem to give way - she falls over - and that is
>> when she begins howling. I wonder if it could be fear
>> rather than pain? There's no frothing at the mouth, no sign
>> of breathlessness or anything like that, and it only lasts a
>> few seconds.
>>
>> --
>> altheim
>
> You need to read up on seizures. They come in all sizes and styles. You
> are confusing grand mal with petit mal seizures or what you see on the
> idiot tube as seizures. Many seizures do not have frothing at the
> mouth. And there is not breathlessness either. Where do you get these
> ideas? From TV? Please take the time to read up any basic level text on
> seizures. I had a cat with seizures and there was never ever any
> frothing or breathlessness --- and the treatment is dirt cheap, usually
> phenobarbital for cats, not Dilantin which is for dogs, but
> phenobarbital. There are more modern medicines but these will do. You
> need to remind the vets of this - most vets in my experience do not
> know much at all about cats and brains. But it helps to uncover the
> cause of seizures, or spells or whatever your cat is undergoing. And
> this will take work on your part. Asking in a newsgroup at this point
> is sad. But most vets won't have a clue either. So I feel badly for all
> concerned. If you can afford it, an x-ray of the skull is usually the
> place to start. An MRI is better but? You are looking for an injury as
> a start. If not injury, then I don't know what would be the cause,
> maybe a tumor? You will need an extremely intelligent vet. There are
> vets who specialize in neurology, usually in vet schools. But even the
> best vet schools may not have a neurology professor vet. So ask. Do you
> have the interest and money to check this out? Sometimes they will take
> in the feline and treat for a reduced cost to show the young and quite
> inexperienced and clueless student vets. This is painful to watch but
> part of the process.

This was a helpful reply. Thanks.

--
altheim

altheim
February 18th 06, 02:38 PM
> wrote:
> altheim wrote:
>> I think I was deeply mistaken about the 'expertise' here.
>
> Read my above post. The treatment is 1/8th grain phenobarbitol twice a
> day for idiopathic seizures for cats. Make sure you are trained how to
> give a tiny pill to a cat. I found it not difficult but not that simple
> either. I just place the pill on the back of her tongue. The cat did
> not ever bite or scratch me either which I found surprising. But maybe
> she knew I was helping her. Maybe you can put it in food. The pill is
> extremely small so easy to deal with.
>
> Before you cast aspersions, you should do some basic reading. From your
> comments, you do not know anything about seizures and appear to be
> going by what you see in the movies or television. There is expertise
> in this newsgroup but you have to bring something to the plate or
> table. Just to bring vague and very wrong suppositions will not be good
> for your cat or your responses from the newsgroup. If you can up your
> knowledge, the responses will increase too.

<ahem> That is precisely why I joined this group, but if you read
back through the first half dozen replies you won't see much
willingness to edify me, beyond instructing me to go to the vet
(which I already knew, dammit). Forgive me if I interpreted that
as an *inability* to edify me.

> Most vets won't have the expertise to solve this problem. So fine. I
> have given you the cure which is extraordinarily cheap. It won't cure
> cure, but if it's a seizure it will stop the cat from having these
> terrifying spells, as they used to be called in a different time and
> place.
>
> Again, 1/8th grain phenobarbitol, B.I.D., got it? That's the
> prescription.
>
> An old drug that you can buy a year's supply for a few dollars.
>
> But you will need to tell the vet's that. If they look it up in their
> textbooks, then can verify what I have posted here.

Thanks again.

--
altheim

February 18th 06, 07:24 PM
altheim wrote:
> > wrote:
> > Most vets won't have the expertise to solve this problem. So fine. I
> > have given you the cure which is extraordinarily cheap. It won't cure
> > cure, but if it's a seizure it will stop the cat from having these
> > terrifying spells, as they used to be called in a different time and
> > place.
> >
> > Again, 1/8th grain phenobarbitol, B.I.D., got it? That's the
> > prescription.
> >
> > An old drug that you can buy a year's supply for a few dollars.
> >
> > But you will need to tell the vet's that. If they look it up in their
> > textbooks, then can verify what I have posted here.
>
> Thanks again.
>
> --
> altheim

Okay but, ahem, you need to post particulars, basics, like what is the
gender and weight of the cat? Is the cat fat? If so, then one has to
think of diabetes and what you are seeing is an attack from spikes or
dips in the blood sugar. If blood sugar, then post the lab results, so
can tell from the glucose levels.

IOW, post whatever info you have. From the info or lack of it, one can
guess if the vets are careful or just winging it.

But weight, gender, and previous history, blood tests, are a start. If
it's a seizure, then phenobarbitol for cats. If not a seizure, then
diabetes, as someone suggested. Dips in blood sugar caused
disorientation and are scary, very scary. And first come the dips, then
later the full spikes, so hypoglycemia then hyperglycemia.

Think of it this way, your cat is fainting. That's a big sign something
is wrong. Heart problems can start with fainting since the heart
controls the oxygenated flow of blood to the brain.

If a human had this problem, all sorts of questions would be asked. But
your cat can't answer. So it's up to you to speak for your cat, which
means, all the details you can muster at your disposal, starting with
gender, weight, and previous tests.

1. Seizures.
2. Blood sugar drops.
3. Heart irregularities.

Just for a start. All the above will cause swoons in mammals.

February 18th 06, 10:28 PM
-L. wrote:
> wrote:
> >
> > Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
> >
> > One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
> > when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
> > was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
> > at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
> > therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."
>
> Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
> seizure symptoms...
> -L.

She'd crouch down low, & frantically (*very* frantically) rub the
bottom of her chin back & forth against the floor - or whatever surface
she was on. This was a good dozen years ago or so... trying to
remember if she vocalized immediately before or during each episode,
but not sure anymore.

Cathy

February 18th 06, 10:32 PM
altheim wrote:
> "-L." > wrote:
> > wrote:
> >>
> >> Nope, but as others have said, it's definitely vet time.
> >>
> >> One of my cats had seizures, which I did not recognize as such. But
> >> when I described the symptoms to my vet, she said, "I'm quite sure she
> >> was having a seizure." And, one of the times I had that particular cat
> >> at the vet, she exhibited the symptoms in the examining room. Vet
> >> therefore witnessed it & confirmed "Seizure."
> >
> > Just out of curiousity, what were her symptoms? I have seen some weird
> > seizure symptoms...
>
> I'm not quite sure what is meant by 'seizure'. It could mean
> anything, yet the Op above, writes it 'Seizure' - in uppercase -
> like it means something specific. I'd be sceptical of any vet
> who said that. I'd want an explanation.

I wrote it with an upper-case "S", simply because of writing mechanics.
IOW, if someone asked, "Would you like a glass of water?", the answer
could be "Yes." The "S" was like the "Y" of "Yes".

Cathy



>
> Anyway, the symptom that stands out in my mind is that
> her legs seem to give way - she falls over - and that is
> when she begins howling. I wonder if it could be fear
> rather than pain? There's no frothing at the mouth, no sign
> of breathlessness or anything like that, and it only lasts a
> few seconds.
>
> --
> altheim

cybercat
February 19th 06, 01:46 AM
"altheim" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote:
> > altheim wrote:
> >>
> >> I should take her to the vet but there is nothing visible to show
> >> him. She is otherwise quite healthy. She eats, drinks and 'goes'
> >> normally, as far as I can tell. We buy her ordinary supermarket
> >> cat food. She sleeps indoors.
> >>
> >
> > Not only can the vet see stuff we don't, they know the right questions
> > to ask to find out the stuff you saw but didn't realize it.
> >
> [snip for brevity]
> > I went to the vet that day, thinking it was an old injury with no
> > treatment. I just wanted to know what it was. I came away knowing my
> > dog had a serious condition that could be controlled easily, but
> > *needed* to be controlled, or it could kill her.
> >
> > Your vet knows a ton more than you do, that's why they studied all this
> > stuff. They will know what to look for, what to check, and what to ask.
>
> This isn't in dispute. I coulda just taken the cat to the vet and
> not bothered with you guys. What is this group for if not to
> talk about cats health and behaviour?
>

Oh, will you please just **** off and take your cat to the vet?
Jesus.

-L.
February 19th 06, 10:12 AM
altheim wrote:
>
> This isn't in dispute. I coulda just taken the cat to the vet and
> not bothered with you guys.

In a case as severe as what you have described, the cat should have
been taken in to a vet asap.

Your cat is having seizures or possibly has a bloot clot or other
serious problem.

>What is this group for if not to
> talk about cats health and behaviour?

This group should never be considered a substitute for a vet visit!
Yes, you can gain knowledge here, but it is not wise to post here
*instead* of seeking medical advice from your vet when your cat is
having such problems!


>
> I think I was deeply mistaken about the 'expertise' here.

I think you need to learn what constitutes a serious medical problem
for your cat!

-L.
(either that or we have just been trolled...)

cybercat
February 19th 06, 05:43 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> I think you need to learn what constitutes a serious medical problem
> for your cat!
>

I am trying to get my mind around *anyone* who would watch their cat
"writhing in agony" and not drop everything and get it to the vet.

February 19th 06, 07:33 PM
Hi,
For some reason there are some very vicious heartless lame creeps in
this group. But the ones that care TRULY out number the few asses that
post repeatedly.
I just delete them. It is sad so many have nothing else to do in their
lives than to try and hurt others.
I dont understand why the moderator puts up with it. If this was my
group they would be LONG gone!
I hope the vet finds out what is going on with kitty.
Prayers to you and yours-
Sarah

February 19th 06, 08:44 PM
Thanks for the info--makes sense now!
Sarah

cybercat
February 19th 06, 09:56 PM
" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Thanks for the info--makes sense now!
> Sarah
>

http://www.dickalba.demon.co.uk/usenet/guide/faq_topp.html

cybercat
February 19th 06, 09:58 PM
"D." > wrote in message
k.net...
> In article m>,
> " > wrote:
>
> > I dont understand why the moderator puts up with it. If this was my
> > group they would be LONG gone!
>
> This is an unmoderated Usenet group. No one owns it or moderates it.
>

Oh, man, didn't you know? I am the moderator.