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JJ
February 17th 06, 11:15 PM
Does anyone in this group have any experience with Feline Diaphragmatic
Hernia?

If you have had the surgical repair done on your cat, could you share
with me what was the experience like for the cat? How about the
recovery?

My Veterinarian made the diagnosis today using xrays. Then she
referred me to a specialist Surgical Veterinarian. The specialists
estimate for the repair is 2000.00. I am devastated because I do not
have this kind of financial reserve.....I literally spend thousands on
my cats every year....I am stunned by this emotionally and financially.
I have a consultation appointment next week.

Thanks in advance to anyone who can share any information or
experiences on this condition. Jen

DJ
February 18th 06, 02:15 AM
I work for a vet and with a rescue group. We have had 2 cats with
diaphragmatic hernias. Both cats were operated on and are now adopted out
to loving forever families. The success of the procedure depends on the
extent of the hernia and other health related problems. It is a very
complicated surgery. Basically they go in and pull everything back down to
where it's supposed to be and close up the hole so that it stays down.
Activity should be kept at a minium for a couple weeks so that the healing
can progress. It is a costly surgery as well. We did get a break since I
work with the vet and I assisted. $1500-$2000 is the going rate. This is a
very hard decision to make. We were extremely lucky that both our guys
pulled through. Look in your heart and do what is best for both you and
your kitty. I wish you the very best of luck with whatever you decide.
Please update with the kitty's progress.
DJ
"JJ" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Does anyone in this group have any experience with Feline Diaphragmatic
> Hernia?
>
> If you have had the surgical repair done on your cat, could you share
> with me what was the experience like for the cat? How about the
> recovery?
>
> My Veterinarian made the diagnosis today using xrays. Then she
> referred me to a specialist Surgical Veterinarian. The specialists
> estimate for the repair is 2000.00. I am devastated because I do not
> have this kind of financial reserve.....I literally spend thousands on
> my cats every year....I am stunned by this emotionally and financially.
> I have a consultation appointment next week.
>
> Thanks in advance to anyone who can share any information or
> experiences on this condition. Jen
>

Switch
February 18th 06, 03:20 AM
JJ wrote:
> Does anyone in this group have any experience with Feline Diaphragmatic
> Hernia?
>
> If you have had the surgical repair done on your cat, could you share
> with me what was the experience like for the cat? How about the
> recovery?

when you say surgical repair, it makes me think you are repairing a
surgery

your cat has not been under the blade for the FDH?

Phil P.
February 18th 06, 08:57 AM
"JJ" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Does anyone in this group have any experience with Feline Diaphragmatic
> Hernia?
>
> If you have had the surgical repair done on your cat, could you share
> with me what was the experience like for the cat? How about the
> recovery?


I assume your cat has a traumatic diaphragmatic hernia rather than
congenital? The prognosis usually depends on the size and seriousness of
the hernia. Almost all of diaphragmatic hernias I've dealt with were
traumatic and most often caused by car accidents- although I've seen a few
cases that were caused by severe abuse (kick).

The surgery can be a little tricky because the surgeon has to repair the
hernia from inside the
abdominal cavity. Still, the success rate for traumatic diaphragmatic
hernia repairs, in my experience, has been about 80%. So, I definitely
recommend surgery.


>
> My Veterinarian made the diagnosis today using xrays. Then she
> referred me to a specialist Surgical Veterinarian. The specialists
> estimate for the repair is 2000.00. I am devastated because I do not
> have this kind of financial reserve.....


Explain your financial situation to the surgeon and ask him if you can pay
the bill in weekly or monthly payments. Also, most vets accept credit
cards.



I literally spend thousands on
> my cats every year....

Welcome to the club.



I am stunned by this emotionally and financially.
> I have a consultation appointment next week.


I understand how you feel- but you'll feel a lot worse, for the rest of your
life, if you don't go through with the surgery.


>
> Thanks in advance to anyone who can share any information or
> experiences on this condition. Jen

Best of luck,

Phil

JJ
February 18th 06, 02:48 PM
I appreciate Phil's posts they are always well written and he is
obviously well educated.

I am struggling with the decision financially and emotionally. Really
there is more to it...

The cat's name is Sugar. I suspect the hernia is traumatic -because
Sugar does go outside. I need to explain also that Sugar has a very
difficult disposition - which is why she lives with me - as I rescue
cats - I try to find the cats new homes through a rescue organization
that I volunteer with...Sugar is one of those cats that falls into the
"unadoptable" scenario because she is difficult - very independent and
needs her space, a cat who hates to be confined. I have ferals that
have been relocated indoors that do better than Sugar - she truly hates
being confined - it is a though she feels trapped. She is with me
because few would probably put up with her....

The surgeon's estimate is starting at 2000, I am no stranger to Vet
Bills - but this one is a whopper, I work a second job already to
insure the cats that I have get good food and good medical care....I do
so much pro-active Vet care that this stunned me, one tries to do
everything right - to be proactive - expecting cats to be ok until old
age if you take the necessary steps.

I am also struggling with some "quality of life" issues. Sugar is that
particular kind cat that is extremely irritable when confined....the
more confined - the more irritable she becomes, it escalates with time.

I have 14 cats total (all rescued) and of that 14, 12 are kept indoors
because I know the risks of a cat going outdoors. I do not think that
I know more that other people, but I have first hand experience with
seeing the dangers and risks or cats doing outside....with my rescue
work and have worked in a Veterinary office. I cannot claim ignorance
in the dangers of letting a cat outdoors, and feel this injury is
partly my fault - I know better, I know cats should never be outside.
But this cat Sugar - is so tremendously miserable indoors, I made a
calculated risk of letting her go outside - and now this. My Vet
thinks she was hit by a car, she looked at the Xrays and made this
diagnosis.

I am also weighing the idea of a prolonged hospitilization and then a
long recovery. Sugar would be miserable in a cage. When I moved
across the country and had to confine her in my car daily during travel
(several days) - she bloodied her face against the metal wires of her
carrier, basically trying to get out of her carrier. On the trip I
gave her sedatives (sometimes a double dose of ACE) and she was still
frantic in a confined space (she is not feral) she very free-spirited I
guess you would say. Eventually on this long cross-country trip - I
had to put her in a soft carrier (to prevent further injury) and she
would roll around in it, it usually took 2 Acepromines to bring her
down enough to travel calmly. On my long trip - she was the most
difficult cat in my entire group - she was the most distressed.

I am trying to weigh the financial issue, her personality.....and all
of it? I guess I will see the surgeon next week so that he can look at
the Xrays and perhaps give me a better outlook on what the extent of
the hernia really is and perhaps - her prognosis. I guess I will ask
how long the cat will be in the hospital and then more about the
recovery and look into the payment plan option.

THis was so unexpected and the whole thing is so daunting. I
appreciate the comments.

February 19th 06, 02:03 PM
You're in a tough spot. I do understand why you let Sugar outside - I
personally also have one rescue cat who is indoor-outdoor, because she
has the same type of personality. It took her years to come inside to
eat and another two years after that to spend nights inside. She has
moved twice with me and has driven both me and the other cats insane
due to the one-month forced containment after each move. She always
escapes anyways, and if she sidelines me stays out for days on end, so
she can now come and go as she pleases (during the day).

You're in the best position to judge whether or not you can confine
Sugar if you opt for surgery, as this is crucial for healing and thus a
long-term normal life. If she will just be in a bad mood for a few
weeks, it'll be rought but should be manageable, maybe you'll have to
confine her to a cage or bathroom. If she will not remain calm, her
prognosis will not be as good.

If I were you, I'd check into the payment options, and if they exist,
discuss the situation with your vet. Describe your cat's personality
honestly, and if it's a good vet, he'll weigh the options with you.

Good luck!