PDA

View Full Version : Depression in Old Cat After 1st Vet Visit in Years


February 19th 06, 10:32 PM
Hello. I've posted here once or twice before about an old cat I
inherited. All I knew about her when I inherited her was that she had
been spayed and given initial shots (rabies, distemper, leukemia) when
she was saved from the streets by my sister in 1994.

One of you was *so* nice and called my little babe a "grand old" cat,
and she is. Or was--before I finally got her to a vet in January,
where she received her first exam, teeth/tartar cleaning, shots, and
microchipping in years (first and only microchipping).

In order to help my little girl, I have to be upfront and say this may
have something to do with those "chicken or the egg" situations. I'm
going through the worst period of stress in my life, so I don't know to
what extent if any my kitty's very dramatic and upsetting behavioral
changes are influenced by my depression and ill health.

1) Increased night-time restlessness and vocalization. Before the vet
visit, she would often prowl our halls, but not meow. Now I've been
without sleep ever since January because she meows for no perceptible
reasons. She eats Fancy Feast exclusively, always has at least three
water bowls and litter boxes available, and frequently little sips of
milk. Her bowel movements have never been better.

2) Dramatic changes in daytime behavior. Of course it is that time of
midwinter where everyone, animals or humans, get really down; and this
is the time of year when vomiting has traditionally happened with her.
But she doesn't want to get near me anymore in the ways she used to
before the vet visit (and catching and trapping her that day is such an
ugly memory, I actually rearranged furniture and mopped every floor in
the house, so that there's no scent of fear pheromones leftover).

She's always ready and willing for a brushing, which I give her at
least three or more times a day, and it's not a matter of *total*
avoidance. She just has a kind of sad hopeless expression that I
sincerely am not imagining. Last week, I took my queen bed apart in
order to put the box spring and mattress on the floor. (She stopped
being able to jump up this past autumn.) I thought she'd come and curl
up with me the way she used to. She'll gladly sleep across the room on
her cushion (in fact, that's what she's doing right now), but she
sleeps almost round the clock--until it's time for me to sleep!

I'm sorry for rambling on so long, but I'm so sad about her aging. For
some reason, her aging reminds me of my own (I'm 49), and vice versa.
So-- Can someone just tell me if it's "normal" for a cat to just lose
interest in living, or to come to life only at night, when she can
avoid human beings?

I have to stress that I did not want to vaccinate her. I did so
because I might relocate to a development where it is required, and now
I feel so guilty, as if I somehow "did" this to her. The vet was
female, an angel, and her staff was great. (The vet gave her a clean
bill of health except for her teeth.)

Thank you all for reading and hopefully responding.

February 19th 06, 10:55 PM
Did you have any blood work done? She may be hyperthyroid. The
restlessness at night. I would have a complete blood work up done on
her.

Vomiting is probably due to shedding the winter coat about now and she
probably has hairballs?

49 is not old! Well - maybe for a cat!

She may be sleeping all day because she is bored. Do you encourage her
to play?

Anna via CatKB.com
February 19th 06, 10:57 PM
>and she is. Or was--before I finally got her to a vet in January,
>where she received her first exam, teeth/tartar cleaning, shots, and
>microchipping in years (first and only microchipping).

Did she have a full blood panel, urinalysis, and T4 test?

>1) Increased night-time restlessness and vocalization. Before the vet
>visit, she would often prowl our halls, but not meow. Now I've been
>without sleep ever since January because she meows for no perceptible

Can be symptoms of hyperthyroidsim, ureamia (from kidney disease),
hypertension or cognitive disfuction.
If she didn't have the above testing, she should have it to find out if she
has hyperthyroidism or kidney disease. If it's cognitive disfunction, she
wakes up at night and is "confused" about where she is and cries out - it
helps to answer her so she realizes where she is.

Anna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

February 19th 06, 11:04 PM
wrote:
> Did you have any blood work done? She may be hyperthyroid. The
> restlessness at night. I would have a complete blood work up done on
> her.
>
> Vomiting is probably due to shedding the winter coat about now and she
> probably has hairballs?
>
> 49 is not old! Well - maybe for a cat!
>
> She may be sleeping all day because she is bored. Do you encourage her
> to play?

Thanks! (And thanks to Anna, too.) No, I didn't have bloodwork done
on her, and I suppose I'll have to go through all of that, especially
'cause the vet suggested I bring her in for a (sedated) teeth
treatment. Funny thing is I have thyroid problems too.

But, no, the sleeping all day thing is definitely not because she has
reason to be bored. She *does* generally sleep around the clock at
this time of year; that part isn't unusual. It's just that she won't
even jump up on a mattress I *know* she can still manage (especially
with a "helper cushion" beside the lowered bed).

Thanks again for the suggestions and support.

Anna via CatKB.com
February 20th 06, 01:58 AM
>Thanks! (And thanks to Anna, too.) No, I didn't have bloodwork done
>on her, and I suppose I'll have to go through all of that, especially
>'cause the vet suggested I bring her in for a (sedated) teeth
>treatment. Funny thing is I have thyroid problems too.

Didn't she just get the teeth cleaning done in January?


Anna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

PawsForThought
February 20th 06, 02:07 AM
wrote:
>> In order to help my little girl, I have to be upfront and say this may
> have something to do with those "chicken or the egg" situations. I'm
> going through the worst period of stress in my life, so I don't know to
> what extent if any my kitty's very dramatic and upsetting behavioral
> changes are influenced by my depression and ill health.

Hi Violet,
Cats are amazing creatures at picking up on our stress, so your kitty's
recent behavior may be related to that. I would definitely get her
checked out thoroughly though, including a full blood panel workup.
I've done a lot of reading about vaccines, and some vets believe that
they can (especially rabies) cause some behavioral changes. An
interesting read is Dr. Martin Goldman's "The Nature of Animal Healing"
- http://tinyurl.com/r6jpj

Lauren

IBen Getiner
February 20th 06, 07:06 AM
wrote:
> Hello. I've posted here once or twice before about an old cat I
> inherited. All I knew about her when I inherited her was that she had
> been spayed and given initial shots (rabies, distemper, leukemia) when
> she was saved from the streets by my sister in 1994.
>
> One of you was *so* nice and called my little babe a "grand old" cat,
> and she is. Or was--before I finally got her to a vet in January,
> where she received her first exam, teeth/tartar cleaning, shots, and
> microchipping in years (first and only microchipping).
>
> In order to help my little girl, I have to be upfront and say this may
> have something to do with those "chicken or the egg" situations. I'm
> going through the worst period of stress in my life, so I don't know to
> what extent if any my kitty's very dramatic and upsetting behavioral
> changes are influenced by my depression and ill health.
>
> 1) Increased night-time restlessness and vocalization. Before the vet
> visit, she would often prowl our halls, but not meow. Now I've been
> without sleep ever since January because she meows for no perceptible
> reasons. She eats Fancy Feast exclusively, always has at least three
> water bowls and litter boxes available, and frequently little sips of
> milk. Her bowel movements have never been better.
>
> 2) Dramatic changes in daytime behavior. Of course it is that time of
> midwinter where everyone, animals or humans, get really down; and this
> is the time of year when vomiting has traditionally happened with her.
> But she doesn't want to get near me anymore in the ways she used to
> before the vet visit (and catching and trapping her that day is such an
> ugly memory, I actually rearranged furniture and mopped every floor in
> the house, so that there's no scent of fear pheromones leftover).
>
> She's always ready and willing for a brushing, which I give her at
> least three or more times a day, and it's not a matter of *total*
> avoidance. She just has a kind of sad hopeless expression that I
> sincerely am not imagining. Last week, I took my queen bed apart in
> order to put the box spring and mattress on the floor. (She stopped
> being able to jump up this past autumn.) I thought she'd come and curl
> up with me the way she used to. She'll gladly sleep across the room on
> her cushion (in fact, that's what she's doing right now), but she
> sleeps almost round the clock--until it's time for me to sleep!
>
> I'm sorry for rambling on so long, but I'm so sad about her aging. For
> some reason, her aging reminds me of my own (I'm 49), and vice versa.
> So-- Can someone just tell me if it's "normal" for a cat to just lose
> interest in living, or to come to life only at night, when she can
> avoid human beings?
>
> I have to stress that I did not want to vaccinate her. I did so
> because I might relocate to a development where it is required, and now
> I feel so guilty, as if I somehow "did" this to her. The vet was
> female, an angel, and her staff was great. (The vet gave her a clean
> bill of health except for her teeth.)
>
> Thank you all for reading and hopefully responding.

Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
whale are internally identical in every respect.
YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
use your brain on that one...


IBen

February 21st 06, 12:15 PM
PawsForThought wrote:
>
> Hi Violet,
> Cats are amazing creatures at picking up on our stress, so your kitty's
> recent behavior may be related to that. I would definitely get her
> checked out thoroughly though, including a full blood panel workup.
> I've done a lot of reading about vaccines, and some vets believe that
> they can (especially rabies) cause some behavioral changes. An
> interesting read is Dr. Martin Goldman's "The Nature of Animal Healing"
> - http://tinyurl.com/r6jpj

Lauren, Rhonda, Margarita, and everyone else (except that awful
person!)-- Thank you very much for the responses. The vet was kind
but very emphatic during the visit about keeping me away from my dolly
when I thought the vet and staff were "hurting" her. I started bawling
like a baby, because at the age of anywhere between 12-15, my doll is
of the age where I thought the vet would find something terribly wrong
with her.

One other thing I forgot to mention. Our routine--mine as well as
D.J.'s--is thrown off on a weekly basis by my elderly and slightly
befuddled mother, who spends half the week at home and half with a
sister (the sister who rescued D.J.). This sister has Mom up her
house to alleviate the stress of elder care on me, but the weekly
disruption of routine actually creates more stress than it solves.

For example, I'm an extremely quiet person who doesn't play the
television loudly even when I'm totally alone. D.J. loves Easy
Listening music, and I play it exclusively when we're alone. My mom,
on the other hand, while not being deaf, has always been loud, messy,
and, well, "Calamity Jane" even before she was old.

So maybe this start/stop of conflicting personalities is wearing on
D.J. as much as it is on me. *That* was why I took D.J. for the
innoculations. I'm waiting for the winter to end, and then I'm
shipping out.

Oh, well, thanks for the chance to vent. Sincere thanks.

clifto
February 22nd 06, 07:26 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
> after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
> with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
> here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
> Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
> whale are internally identical in every respect.
> YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
> bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
> kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
> This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
> thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
> sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
> use your brain on that one...

Hey, Ben? You need about 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of potassium chloride.

--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
-- Solomon W. Golomb

IBen Getiner
February 22nd 06, 09:22 AM
clifto wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
> > after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
> > with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
> > here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
> > Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
> > whale are internally identical in every respect.
> > YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
> > bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
> > kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
> > This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
> > thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
> > sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
> > use your brain on that one...
>
> Hey, Ben? You need about 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of potassium chloride.
>
> --
> All relevant people are pertinent.
> All rude people are impertinent.
> Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
> -- Solomon W. Golomb


Talk your evasive krap all the live-long day but it's just like I said
a while back... You arbitrarily remove a female cat's female parts and
you get the same problems that female humans get... Depression for
starters. Here is another example of what your kind of reasoning has
delivered.... ANOTHER SICK CAT (and of course, another befuddled
owner). You must be proud!



IBen Getiner

whayface
February 22nd 06, 01:46 PM
>> Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
>> after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
>> with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
>> here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
>> Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
>> whale are internally identical in every respect.
>> YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
>> bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
>> kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
>> This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
>> thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
>> sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
>> use your brain on that one...
>
>Hey, Ben? You need about 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of potassium chloride.

Among other things !!

PawsForThought
February 22nd 06, 01:46 PM
wrote:
> Lauren, Rhonda, Margarita, and everyone else (except that awful
> person!)-- Thank you very much for the responses. The vet was kind
> but very emphatic during the visit about keeping me away from my dolly
> when I thought the vet and staff were "hurting" her. I started bawling
> like a baby, because at the age of anywhere between 12-15, my doll is
> of the age where I thought the vet would find something terribly wrong
> with her.

I'm sorry to hear how upsetting it was for you. I remember when I had
my 17 year old cat at the vet and they were doing a procedure. I was
out in the lobby and I could hear her meowing her head off. It was
very upsetting to hear that. But I knew she was in good hands and that
the treatment was absolutely necessary for her well-being.

> One other thing I forgot to mention. Our routine--mine as well as
> D.J.'s--is thrown off on a weekly basis by my elderly and slightly
> befuddled mother, who spends half the week at home and half with a
> sister (the sister who rescued D.J.). This sister has Mom up her
> house to alleviate the stress of elder care on me, but the weekly
> disruption of routine actually creates more stress than it solves.
>
> For example, I'm an extremely quiet person who doesn't play the
> television loudly even when I'm totally alone. D.J. loves Easy
> Listening music, and I play it exclusively when we're alone. My mom,
> on the other hand, while not being deaf, has always been loud, messy,
> and, well, "Calamity Jane" even before she was old.

I''m sure that can't be easy to deal with. Do you think your mom would
be open to wearing a pair of headphones when she watches TV?

> So maybe this start/stop of conflicting personalities is wearing on
> D.J. as much as it is on me. *That* was why I took D.J. for the
> innoculations. I'm waiting for the winter to end, and then I'm
> shipping out.

Best wishes. I hope things work out for you.

take care,
Lauren

clifto
February 22nd 06, 11:39 PM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> clifto wrote:
>> IBen Getiner wrote:
>> > Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
>> > after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
>> > with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
>> > here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
>> > Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
>> > whale are internally identical in every respect.
>> > YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
>> > bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
>> > kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
>> > This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
>> > thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
>> > sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
>> > use your brain on that one...
>>
>> Hey, Ben? You need about 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of potassium chloride.
>
> Talk your evasive krap all the live-long day but it's just like I said
> a while back... You arbitrarily remove a female cat's female parts and
> you get the same problems that female humans get... Depression for
> starters. Here is another example of what your kind of reasoning has
> delivered.... ANOTHER SICK CAT (and of course, another befuddled
> owner). You must be proud!

I am, Ben. I'm VERY proud. Thank you for speculating.

--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
-- Solomon W. Golomb

clifto
February 22nd 06, 11:43 PM
PawsForThought wrote:
> wrote:
>> Lauren, Rhonda, Margarita, and everyone else (except that awful
>> person!)-- Thank you very much for the responses. The vet was kind
>> but very emphatic during the visit about keeping me away from my dolly
>> when I thought the vet and staff were "hurting" her. I started bawling
>> like a baby, because at the age of anywhere between 12-15, my doll is
>> of the age where I thought the vet would find something terribly wrong
>> with her.
>
> I'm sorry to hear how upsetting it was for you. I remember when I had
> my 17 year old cat at the vet and they were doing a procedure. I was
> out in the lobby and I could hear her meowing her head off. It was
> very upsetting to hear that. But I knew she was in good hands and that
> the treatment was absolutely necessary for her well-being.

When Julius had pleural effusions of unknown etiology, I had the vet show me
how to drain his chest. I held Julius down while the vet demonstrated the
procedure. Julius hollered and writhed and screamed, NOT because the procedure
was uncomfortable, but because he *hated* being restrained. Immediately on
his release, he laid down on the table and relaxed, *very* pleased with his
newfound ability to take a deep breath.

Anyone who's pilled a cat knows hollering and screaming.

--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
-- Solomon W. Golomb

IBen Getiner
February 23rd 06, 04:42 AM
clifto wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > clifto wrote:
> >> IBen Getiner wrote:
> >> > Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
> >> > after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
> >> > with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
> >> > here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
> >> > Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
> >> > whale are internally identical in every respect.
> >> > YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
> >> > bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
> >> > kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
> >> > This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
> >> > thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
> >> > sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
> >> > use your brain on that one...
> >>
> >> Hey, Ben?
> >
> > Talk your evasive krap all the live-long day but it's just like I said
> > a while back... You arbitrarily remove a female cat's female parts and
> > you get the same problems that female humans get... Depression for
> > starters. Here is another example of what your kind of reasoning has
> > delivered.... ANOTHER SICK CAT (and of course, another befuddled
> > owner). You must be proud!
>
> I am, Ben. I'm VERY proud. Thank you for speculating.

Good! Then we have that much settled! I have shown you where you are
an insensitive son of a bitch. You have agreed.
You see.... it iz YOU who needs the 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of
potassium chloride. Not I. I love cats. I love them enough NOT to have
their ballz cut out or their ovaries removed arbitrarily. Especially
when there's no reason on earth to do it with an inside job. You on the
other hand approve of it. And why? Who told you to think this way,
Kliff..?
I was attempting to help this lady here see that her blatant misdeeds
are what led to her cat's depression. SHE is to blame. SHE is at fault.
Because she thinks and acts just like you.
And you say you are proud of it..... You're much sicker than I thought,
Kliff. Double the recommended dosage....
****in' insensitive jerk-off AZZHOLE


IBen
> --
> All relevant people..........

<snip horse**** drivel>

dgk
February 23rd 06, 01:52 PM
On 22 Feb 2006 20:42:41 -0800, "IBen Getiner" >
wrote:

>

>> >> IBen Getiner wrote:
>> >> > Yeah... You 'did this to her' This happened, just like I said it would,
>> >> > after you gave her the needless hysterectomy operation. And just like
>> >> > with human mammals, depression sometimes follows. Of course, no one in
>> >> > here took me seriously when I made this observation about a year ago.
>> >> > Why, I do not know, since every mammal from a shrew to a great blue
>> >> > whale are internally identical in every respect.
>> >> > YOU did it because you just HAD to jump on the politically correct
>> >> > bandwagon and you used your kat to do it. LIVE with it. Just like your
>> >> > kitty now must do every day for the rest of her LIFE.
>> >> > This kind of stuff... needless stuff... makes me ****ing sick. The best
>> >> > thing you could do for your kat would be to give her away. Just make
>> >> > sure that he family you give her to are not Chinese. At least try to
>> >> > use your brain on that one...

Ben, even PETA agrees that cats should be neutered. Either or just let
them out to be run over because they'll be climbing the walls.

clifto
February 23rd 06, 10:56 PM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> You see.... it iz YOU who needs the 5 grams of valium and 100 mg of
> potassium chloride. Not I. I love cats. I love them enough NOT to have
> their ballz cut out or their ovaries removed arbitrarily. Especially
> when there's no reason on earth to do it with an inside job. You on the
> other hand approve of it. And why? Who told you to think this way,
> Kliff..?

Every single year when the weather turns to bone-chilling frigid, my first
thoughts are for the poor animals stuck out in it. If more of them were
neutered/castrated, fewer of them would be out there fighting for the tiny
bits of available food and the few safe, comparatively warm spots to hide
from the death-dealing frost.

Every time I visit a shelter, I see all those homeless animals who wouldn't
have been born to uncaring bozos and feral animals; and that's not even to
give a thought to the shelters that kill them after a short time. One of
my own was obtained by my nephew by walking into a shelter and adopting the
cat next cited for the gas chamber.

Neutered cats don't torture themselves in heat a week out of every month.
Castrated cats don't spray or get overly aggressive. They all make better
pets.

You find caring homes for ALL those animals and I'll be the first one to
join your little crusade.

--
All relevant people are pertinent.
All rude people are impertinent.
Therefore, no rude people are relevant.
-- Solomon W. Golomb

PawsForThought
March 5th 06, 03:55 PM
wrote:> Lauren, you have no idea how much you're
in my thoughts and prayers
> too, because no one in our entire family has *ever* defended me for
> making this suggestion (which my mother graciously acted on).
>
> Thanks again, folks, and I hope today with your cats or kitties is a
> peaceful peaceful day.

Hi Violet,
I'm so sorry to hear about your continuing problems. I'm glad to hear
though that your mom has gotten some headphones :)

As far as your cat allergy, I can make a recommendation to you based
upon my husband's allergy to our cats and what worked for him. I have
emailed you.

Lauren

PawsForThought
March 5th 06, 06:46 PM
wrote:
> PawsForThought wrote:
>
> > As far as your cat allergy, I can make a recommendation to you based
> > upon my husband's allergy to our cats and what worked for him. I have
> > emailed you.
>
> Hi, Lauren. I haven't gotten the email yet (12:34 EST). If it doesn't
> come through by tomorrow, maybe you can re-email it.
>
> Thank you so much.

Hi Violet,
Sorry for the delay. You should have it now. Let me know and if not,
I'll send again.

Lauren