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February 20th 06, 12:04 AM
I have a Siamese cat whose name is Dexter. He is approximately 10
years old. We welcomed him into our family when he was about 3 or 4.
He was in horrible condition -- his nails were not taken care of, his
hair was horrible, etc. It took him about 6 months to adjust to us.
We moved after having him about 4 years. His transition to the new
place was great. No problems at all. We moved again at the end of
September. We had to board him for a week because the owners of our
new house had not left it yet. When we did move in, again we had no
difficulties with the cat.

I am a teacher and I was at home for two weeks around the holidays.
Sure enough, when Dexter was left alone again after I returned to work,
he peed by the door. This happened off and on for a couple of weeks
before I took him to the vet. The doctor put him on antibiotics for a
week (although he did not test his urine because he could not get
Dexter to go). He did take his blood. The peeing continued so we took
him in again and this time the doctor was able to get his urine. The
urinalysis was clear so the vet said it was probably behavioral. He
recommended we put the cat in the laundry room (this is the only place
in our house where we could put him in - the bathrooms are too small
and the kitchen does not have doors) whenever we go out and also at
night. The problem is now that Dexter is retaliating. After being in
the room Thursday night to Friday afternoon (husband worked 6am to
2pm), he ran up the stairs and peed on my son's mat that is under his
chair. This morning we had to grocery shop and when we let him out of
the laundry room when we got back, he'd thrown up several times in the
room.

My problem is I think that putting him in the room (which is supposedly
supposed to retrain him) is making him hostile towards us (hence the
peeing in the dining room) and probably stressing him out (the throwing
up). I plan to call the vet again tomorrow to see if he has any other
ideas. We do plan on taking up the piece of carpet in front of the
door and putting linoleum (we'd planned to do that even before that cat
was peeing there). Hopefully that will get rid of the smell and cut
down on his instinct to pee there.

Is there anything else we can try? Any tests or problems the vet could
have missed? He did say that Dexter had lost 5 ounces in two weeks.
(Now weighing about 9 pounds). But the blood and urine was clear.

Thanks,

Tiggerific

Gail
February 20th 06, 12:33 AM
How many litter boxes do you have? You should have two boxes (one on each
floor of the house). Some cats have interstitial cystitis which causes pain
when they urinate. If there is no urinary tract infection, your vet can put
him on an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication which may help him.
Also, you must completely eliminate the smell where he has urinated
inappropriately. Use an exzyme cleaner. The smell will draw him back to
those spots. If your vet is not helpful, see another one. Many vets
specialize in cats and their problems.
Gail
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have a Siamese cat whose name is Dexter. He is approximately 10
> years old. We welcomed him into our family when he was about 3 or 4.
> He was in horrible condition -- his nails were not taken care of, his
> hair was horrible, etc. It took him about 6 months to adjust to us.
> We moved after having him about 4 years. His transition to the new
> place was great. No problems at all. We moved again at the end of
> September. We had to board him for a week because the owners of our
> new house had not left it yet. When we did move in, again we had no
> difficulties with the cat.
>
> I am a teacher and I was at home for two weeks around the holidays.
> Sure enough, when Dexter was left alone again after I returned to work,
> he peed by the door. This happened off and on for a couple of weeks
> before I took him to the vet. The doctor put him on antibiotics for a
> week (although he did not test his urine because he could not get
> Dexter to go). He did take his blood. The peeing continued so we took
> him in again and this time the doctor was able to get his urine. The
> urinalysis was clear so the vet said it was probably behavioral. He
> recommended we put the cat in the laundry room (this is the only place
> in our house where we could put him in - the bathrooms are too small
> and the kitchen does not have doors) whenever we go out and also at
> night. The problem is now that Dexter is retaliating. After being in
> the room Thursday night to Friday afternoon (husband worked 6am to
> 2pm), he ran up the stairs and peed on my son's mat that is under his
> chair. This morning we had to grocery shop and when we let him out of
> the laundry room when we got back, he'd thrown up several times in the
> room.
>
> My problem is I think that putting him in the room (which is supposedly
> supposed to retrain him) is making him hostile towards us (hence the
> peeing in the dining room) and probably stressing him out (the throwing
> up). I plan to call the vet again tomorrow to see if he has any other
> ideas. We do plan on taking up the piece of carpet in front of the
> door and putting linoleum (we'd planned to do that even before that cat
> was peeing there). Hopefully that will get rid of the smell and cut
> down on his instinct to pee there.
>
> Is there anything else we can try? Any tests or problems the vet could
> have missed? He did say that Dexter had lost 5 ounces in two weeks.
> (Now weighing about 9 pounds). But the blood and urine was clear.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Tiggerific
>

February 20th 06, 12:46 AM
Gail wrote:
> How many litter boxes do you have? You should have two boxes (one on each
> floor of the house).

We can only have one although we have two floors. There is no room in
the kitchen for a litter box and the bathrooms are small as well. We
used to live in a four floor house with only one pan - no problems when
we lived there.

Some cats have interstitial cystitis which causes pain
> when they urinate.

Does that come on suddenly? He's definetly peeing - husband finds
urine in there and has not noticed a change in the amount. Is there a
way to know if he has cystitis?

If there is no urinary tract infection, your vet can put
> him on an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication which may help him.

My doctor is pretty conservative -- I will ask him about medication
though when I speak to him tomorrow.

> Also, you must completely eliminate the smell where he has urinated
> inappropriately. Use an exzyme cleaner. The smell will draw him back to
> those spots.

We are definitely aware of him being drawn back to the same locations.
Any recommendations on enzyme cleaners?

If your vet is not helpful, see another one. Many vets
> specialize in cats and their problems.

He is very helpful - talked to my husband at 6:45 pm at night for at
least 20-25 minutes when he got the results of the urinalysis - on a
Friday night no less. I am hoping he has some good suggestions
tomorrow.

> Gail

Thanks Gail!

February 20th 06, 04:01 AM
We heard about this product from the receptionist at the vet's office
actually - do you think it's available at Petsmart?

Spot
February 20th 06, 04:10 AM
I had a cat who would only pee in one box and poop in the other. Until you
find out what is going on get another box just to be sure it's not something
like what I just described. What's the big deal if you don't like it out in
the open then get a hooded box. Also make sure the litter box is back out
of the way cats they don't like them where there is a lot of traffic. You
have to look at it from the cats point of view. Who'd want to be doing
their business for all the world to see. Just some suggestions to start
with.

Celeste



> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Gail wrote:
>> How many litter boxes do you have? You should have two boxes (one on each
>> floor of the house).
>
> We can only have one although we have two floors. There is no room in
> the kitchen for a litter box and the bathrooms are small as well. We
> used to live in a four floor house with only one pan - no problems when
> we lived there.
>
> Some cats have interstitial cystitis which causes pain
>> when they urinate.
>
> Does that come on suddenly? He's definetly peeing - husband finds
> urine in there and has not noticed a change in the amount. Is there a
> way to know if he has cystitis?
>
> If there is no urinary tract infection, your vet can put
>> him on an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication which may help him.
>
> My doctor is pretty conservative -- I will ask him about medication
> though when I speak to him tomorrow.
>
>> Also, you must completely eliminate the smell where he has urinated
>> inappropriately. Use an exzyme cleaner. The smell will draw him back to
>> those spots.
>
> We are definitely aware of him being drawn back to the same locations.
> Any recommendations on enzyme cleaners?
>
> If your vet is not helpful, see another one. Many vets
>> specialize in cats and their problems.
>
> He is very helpful - talked to my husband at 6:45 pm at night for at
> least 20-25 minutes when he got the results of the urinalysis - on a
> Friday night no less. I am hoping he has some good suggestions
> tomorrow.
>
>> Gail
>
> Thanks Gail!
>

February 20th 06, 03:27 PM
He has a hooded box. If you reread some of my other posts, you'll see
that I noted I have no other space for another box. He's peed and
pooped in the same box for almost seven years.

Thanks,

Tiggerific

February 20th 06, 03:27 PM
Also, note he is only peeing outside the box when we are gone.

Tiggerific

Alison
February 20th 06, 04:09 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I have a Siamese cat whose name is Dexter. He is approximately 10
> years old. We welcomed him into our family when he was about 3 or 4.
> He was in horrible condition -- his nails were not taken care of, his
> hair was horrible, etc. It took him about 6 months to adjust to us.
> We moved after having him about 4 years. His transition to the new
> place was great. No problems at all. We moved again at the end of
> September. We had to board him for a week because the owners of our
> new house had not left it yet. When we did move in, again we had no
> difficulties with the cat.
>
> I am a teacher and I was at home for two weeks around the holidays.
> Sure enough, when Dexter was left alone again after I returned to work,
> he peed by the door. This happened off and on for a couple of weeks
> before I took him to the vet. The doctor put him on antibiotics for a
> week (although he did not test his urine because he could not get
> Dexter to go). He did take his blood. The peeing continued so we took
> him in again and this time the doctor was able to get his urine. The
> urinalysis was clear so the vet said it was probably behavioral. He
> recommended we put the cat in the laundry room (this is the only place
> in our house where we could put him in - the bathrooms are too small
> and the kitchen does not have doors) whenever we go out and also at
> night. The problem is now that Dexter is retaliating. After being in
> the room Thursday night to Friday afternoon (husband worked 6am to
> 2pm), he ran up the stairs and peed on my son's mat that is under his
> chair. This morning we had to grocery shop and when we let him out of
> the laundry room when we got back, he'd thrown up several times in the
> room.
>
> My problem is I think that putting him in the room (which is supposedly
> supposed to retrain him) is making him hostile towards us (hence the
> peeing in the dining room) and probably stressing him out (the throwing
> up). I plan to call the vet again tomorrow to see if he has any other
> ideas. We do plan on taking up the piece of carpet in front of the
> door and putting linoleum (we'd planned to do that even before that cat
> was peeing there). Hopefully that will get rid of the smell and cut
> down on his instinct to pee there.
>
> Is there anything else we can try? Any tests or problems the vet could
> have missed? He did say that Dexter had lost 5 ounces in two weeks.
> (Now weighing about 9 pounds). But the blood and urine was clear.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Tiggerific

Here's two links with info spraying

http://www.fabcats.org/spraying.html
http://www.apbc.org.uk/article10.htm

Well done for taking him to the vets and having thorough tests done.
Sometimes stress can exacerbate any underlying illness a cat may
have.
Dexters getting on a bit now and cats don't do well with change.
Moving to a new home and being in kennels is major stress and insecurity
for him, and he is reacting to how he feels. It's not any ones fault and
you understand he is stressed and are taking steps to deal with it. The
Feliway is a good idea. I have a Feliway diffuser plug- in for my cat. You
could put a plug in diffuser near where Dexter sleeps the most and you
can use a spray and spray it where he urinates .
Dexter can't help feeling like this , he's not doing it to retaliate or
feel hostile. The smell of his wee makes him feel more secure. The more
insecure he feels the more he sprays. It's a cat thing. Once he feels
better in himself and more secure he should stop doing it.
Does he like to play? Fishing rod type toys tempt older cats to play. A
couple of short sessions a day will help raise his mood.
Where does he like to sleep, perhaps making it extra comfy will and spray
it with Feliway encourage him to sleep more when you go out.
You could use a heated bed or a sleeping bag that he can get right
inside.
--
Alison
http://catinfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
http://doginfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/

>

February 20th 06, 08:10 PM
I am definitely getting the Feliway products.

I know he's can't help feeling like this, I don't blame him. He has
several toys although he used to really ignore him. The last few
nights he's been playing with them, which makes me feel better. He has
a comfortable mat to sleep on - he does not like beds.

Thanks for the suggestions!

Tiggerific

February 20th 06, 11:13 PM
> You might want to try a Feliway diffuser. It's a synthetic pheromone you
> use like an air freshener that can be soothing (you can't smell it).
>

Does the regular spray smell?

I was at a cat show this past weekend, and my cat wasn't too happy
about it. I think he thought he was up for adoption again. He was fine
at the first ring, and then he had a visit from his foster mom. We
didn't even think about what the might do until later in the day. I was
so excited for her to see him again, and she happy to see him since
most fosters get adopted and you don't really see them much after that.

A few breeders mentioned feliway and said it stunk. Bad. I have
allergies, so I really don't want to buy it if it is going to smell
really strong. I tried Rescue Remedy, and it didn't seem to help him.
Also tried another supplement for anger and resentment (he looked
angry). And later, a pill that is supposed to calm and lavendar which
set off my allergies but didn't seem to hilp him much.

He did look more and more relaxed in the regular cage. He attracted a
lot of attention at his cage, enjoyed some nice massages, and showed
what a gorgeous cat you can get at shelter. But he was still hissing at
the judges, something I have not seen him do in the year that I have
had him. I really thought he would just sulk or pout. He's been so
gentle and easy going, I never expected him to hiss or swat (he did
keep his claws sheathed), and he growled once, something I didn't think
he had in him.

I'd like to try the feliway if it really doesn't stink.