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Chakolate
February 20th 06, 09:01 PM
After worrying myself over the claw clipping issue, and getting lots of
good advice, I did it today. I didn't exactly use any of the methods
suggested, but a sort of combo of everything.

First, I made myself relax and feel positive, hoping to transmit some of
that to my very sensitive kitties. I think that was really half the
problem - before I always got so tense that they were a little eeked out.
So to those who suggested that it could be a positive experience for the
cat, thanks.

Since my place is very cold and I wear lots of layers of clothes, I
didn't have to worry about getting scratched or bitten. I put treats in
my pocket and clippers within easy reach. I tucked Doc under my right
arm and took hold of his left paw. He struggled a bit, but when I gently
increased the pressure of my right arm, he calmed - he's pretty good at
sensing when I'm serious. :-) I held the clippers in my right hand, and
held his forearm with my left, and used my left index finger to push
under the toes to make the claws pop out. Clip, clip, clip, clip. Kitty
treat. Switch paws, clip, clip, clip, clip. All the while telling him
what a good boy he was. Kitty treat. When I was all done, he jumped
down, then came back to look for more treats. :-) So I guess he wasn't
too traumatized.

Pi, ever sensitive to the slightest preferential treatment toward Doc,
came and was looking for his treats, so he got clipped the same way and
got his treat.

Now they're both sitting right where they were clipped, looking for more
treats. :-)

So I'm one happy camper today - and thanks to everyone who made
suggestions. You guys are the best.

Next question: how do you help a cat stay clean when he *hates* the
water?

Chak

--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould

Jo Firey
February 20th 06, 10:58 PM
"Chakolate" > wrote in message
44.170...

>
> Next question: how do you help a cat stay clean when he *hates* the
> water?


With a warm damp washcloth. And do it every day or every few days or the
job will be too big for that to work.


They also have cat wipes like baby wipes. And I'm pretty sure there is cat
dry shampoo if the whole coat has the greasy look.

Just a note to someone else here who was using baby shampoo on a cat, if you
buy kitten shampoo it is worth it. It doesn't suds up a lot but it does the
job, and its a whole lot easier to rinse it all out.

Jo

February 20th 06, 11:35 PM
Chakolate > wrote:

> After worrying myself over the claw clipping issue, and getting
> lots of good advice, I did it today. [snip]

Wow, I'm impressed!! You sure did have a success. Either your kitties
are more relaxed than you though, or you are *good*! Good job!

Joyce

Victor Martinez
February 21st 06, 12:42 AM
Chakolate wrote:
> Next question: how do you help a cat stay clean when he *hates* the
> water?

My cats clean themselves. :)

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Wayne Mitchell
February 21st 06, 04:45 AM
Chakolate > wrote:

>So I'm one happy camper today - and thanks to everyone who made
>suggestions. You guys are the best.

Wow, Chak! I'm impressed. I have zero confidence that I could
have that kind of success with Heidi.

--

Wayne M
(indulged by Will and Heidi)

Sandy
February 21st 06, 05:08 AM
Congratulations on the claw clipping success!

Do you brush or otherwise groom your cats? Some of mine have benefitted
from that, and some seem not to need it. It can help their coat stay
looking nice, too.

Sandy

"Chakolate" > wrote in message
44.170...
> After worrying myself over the claw clipping issue, and getting lots of
> good advice, I did it today. I didn't exactly use any of the methods
> suggested, but a sort of combo of everything.
>
> First, I made myself relax and feel positive, hoping to transmit some of
> that to my very sensitive kitties. I think that was really half the
> problem - before I always got so tense that they were a little eeked out.
> So to those who suggested that it could be a positive experience for the
> cat, thanks.
>
> Since my place is very cold and I wear lots of layers of clothes, I
> didn't have to worry about getting scratched or bitten. I put treats in
> my pocket and clippers within easy reach. I tucked Doc under my right
> arm and took hold of his left paw. He struggled a bit, but when I gently
> increased the pressure of my right arm, he calmed - he's pretty good at
> sensing when I'm serious. :-) I held the clippers in my right hand, and
> held his forearm with my left, and used my left index finger to push
> under the toes to make the claws pop out. Clip, clip, clip, clip. Kitty
> treat. Switch paws, clip, clip, clip, clip. All the while telling him
> what a good boy he was. Kitty treat. When I was all done, he jumped
> down, then came back to look for more treats. :-) So I guess he wasn't
> too traumatized.
>
> Pi, ever sensitive to the slightest preferential treatment toward Doc,
> came and was looking for his treats, so he got clipped the same way and
> got his treat.
>
> Now they're both sitting right where they were clipped, looking for more
> treats. :-)
>
> So I'm one happy camper today - and thanks to everyone who made
> suggestions. You guys are the best.
>
> Next question: how do you help a cat stay clean when he *hates* the
> water?
>
> Chak
>
> --
> In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
> would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
> might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
> time in physics classrooms.
> --Stephen Jay Gould

badwilson
February 21st 06, 05:59 AM
Great job, congratulations! And it will get even easier from here on
because they will get used to it.
About bathing your cats, you shouldn't have to they should keep
themselves clean. But if they don't, don't bathe them at this time.
Your place sounds very cold and you don't want them hanging around with
wet fur in the cold.
--
Britta
Purring is an automatic safety valve device for dealing with happiness
overflow.
- Anonymous
Check out pictures of Vino at:
http://photos.yahoo.com/badwilson click on the Vino album


Chakolate wrote:
> After worrying myself over the claw clipping issue, and getting lots
> of good advice, I did it today. I didn't exactly use any of the
> methods suggested, but a sort of combo of everything.
>
> First, I made myself relax and feel positive, hoping to transmit some
> of that to my very sensitive kitties. I think that was really half
> the problem - before I always got so tense that they were a little
> eeked out. So to those who suggested that it could be a positive
> experience for the cat, thanks.
>
> Since my place is very cold and I wear lots of layers of clothes, I
> didn't have to worry about getting scratched or bitten. I put treats
> in my pocket and clippers within easy reach. I tucked Doc under my
> right arm and took hold of his left paw. He struggled a bit, but
> when I gently increased the pressure of my right arm, he calmed -
> he's pretty good at sensing when I'm serious. :-) I held the
> clippers in my right hand, and held his forearm with my left, and
> used my left index finger to push under the toes to make the claws
> pop out. Clip, clip, clip, clip. Kitty treat. Switch paws, clip,
> clip, clip, clip. All the while telling him what a good boy he was.
> Kitty treat. When I was all done, he jumped down, then came back to
> look for more treats. :-) So I guess he wasn't too traumatized.
>
> Pi, ever sensitive to the slightest preferential treatment toward Doc,
> came and was looking for his treats, so he got clipped the same way
> and got his treat.
>
> Now they're both sitting right where they were clipped, looking for
> more treats. :-)
>
> So I'm one happy camper today - and thanks to everyone who made
> suggestions. You guys are the best.
>
> Next question: how do you help a cat stay clean when he *hates* the
> water?
>
> Chak

Chakolate
February 22nd 06, 04:10 AM
"Sandy" > wrote in
. com:

> Congratulations on the claw clipping success!

Thanks.

> Do you brush or otherwise groom your cats? Some of mine have
> benefitted from that, and some seem not to need it. It can help their
> coat stay looking nice, too.

They get brushed regularly; in shedding season, I'll brush them while
I'm watching tv, up to an hour a day. The hair keeps coming and
coming...

I brush them, I vacuum, and I still have tumbleweeds. Why aren't they
bald?

Chak

--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould

Chakolate
February 22nd 06, 04:14 AM
"badwilson" > wrote in news:45vl3uF8iqulU1
@individual.net:

> Great job, congratulations! And it will get even easier from here on
> because they will get used to it.

Actually, I think Doc is already aware that he's more comfortable now.
He was on me today, and I realized I hadn't done the dew claw, so I got
out the clippers and got them right on the spot, while he was teaching a
piece of string on my jacket not to be so uppity. He stopped for a
second and looked, then went right back to working on that string.

> About bathing your cats, you shouldn't have to they should keep
> themselves clean. But if they don't, don't bathe them at this time.
> Your place sounds very cold and you don't want them hanging around with
> wet fur in the cold.

Yeah, I figured that - I'm mostly asking now because I like to get used
to the idea of whatever it is I'm going to do, and I figure it'll take me
until high summer to get up the nerve to try anything. :-)

Even though I didn't need the warning, thanks for giving it.


Chak

--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould

Chakolate
February 22nd 06, 04:14 AM
"Jo Firey" > wrote in
:

> They also have cat wipes like baby wipes.

Oh, I think I've seen those. Maybe that'll be worth a try when the
warmer weather gets here.

Chak



--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould

Chakolate
February 22nd 06, 04:15 AM
wrote in news:43fa441e$0$58090
:

> Chakolate > wrote:
>
> > After worrying myself over the claw clipping issue, and getting
> > lots of good advice, I did it today. [snip]
>
> Wow, I'm impressed!! You sure did have a success. Either your kitties
> are more relaxed than you though, or you are *good*! Good job!

<blush> Why, thankee, ma'am. :-)

Chak


--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould

Chakolate
February 22nd 06, 04:16 AM
Wayne Mitchell > wrote in
:

> Chakolate > wrote:
>
>>So I'm one happy camper today - and thanks to everyone who made
>>suggestions. You guys are the best.
>
> Wow, Chak! I'm impressed. I have zero confidence that I could
> have that kind of success with Heidi.
>

Thanks. Once I realized that the worst that could happen was that I
would be bitten or scratched, I stopped worrying. I get bitten or
scratched all the time, no biggie, right?

Chak

--
In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
time in physics classrooms.
--Stephen Jay Gould