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Niel Humphreys
February 25th 06, 02:49 PM
Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other old
boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks he
has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his heart
is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating from
the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.

Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while afterwards
but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might be for
a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to say
bye bye to my friend of 14 years?

--

Niel H

cybercat
February 25th 06, 10:45 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other
old
> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks he
> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his heart
> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating from
> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
>
> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
afterwards
> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might be
for
> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to say
> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
>
> --

I had an ultrasound done for my cat who had little fainting like fits, and
it
turned out her heart was structurally sound, so the doctor put her on a beta
blocker and she has no fits as long as I keep her on it. His theory is that
her
heart rate had been too fast for too long (due to undiagnosed hyperthyroid)
so she had developed arrythmia and actually fibrillated at times, I guess.
What does the vet say? The ultrasound cost me $265. The vet had to call in
a guy to come do it, as they don't have the equipment. They shaved Booboos
little tuxedo chest, otherwise did not harm a hair on her. (She was mad, but
Abu BooBoo stayes that way!)

Niel Humphreys
February 25th 06, 11:09 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other
> old
>> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks
>> he
>> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his
>> heart
>> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating
>> from
>> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
>>
>> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
> afterwards
>> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might be
> for
>> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to
>> say
>> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
>>
>> --
>
> I had an ultrasound done for my cat who had little fainting like fits, and
> it
> turned out her heart was structurally sound, so the doctor put her on a
> beta
> blocker and she has no fits as long as I keep her on it. His theory is
> that
> her
> heart rate had been too fast for too long (due to undiagnosed
> hyperthyroid)
> so she had developed arrythmia and actually fibrillated at times, I guess.
> What does the vet say?

No, this is definitely a heart problem. When he is lying there you can
actually see his chest sides pulse in beat with the heart at normal speed.
It is separate from his breating as you can see the normal breating 'in and
out' of his tummy a bit further back. The vet had a good long listen with a
stethoscope to what was going on and wasn't happy. Worf had a minor wheezing
fit at the vets too which helped to demonstrate his symptoms. The vet is a
small 'one man' practice and he knows all my cats by name so the same person
sees them every time which also helps as he is familiar with them.

Having said that, today he's not fitted and seems happy with big purrs when
he got his combing this evening.

--

Niel H

Phil P.
February 26th 06, 07:10 AM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other
old
> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks he
> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his heart
> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating from
> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
>
> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
afterwards
> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might be
for
> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to say
> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?

How is his heart enlarged; in a ball shape or valentine-shape?

His breathing difficulty might be due to pulmonary edema. Speak to your vet
about a diuretic (furosemide/Lasix). If he prescribes a diuretic, mention a
potassium supplement since rapid urine formation caused by diuretics
increases potassium excretion and could lead to hypokalemia.

If I were you, I would consult a veterinary cardiologist.

Best of luck,

Phil

Niel Humphreys
February 26th 06, 07:43 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other
> old
>> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks
>> he
>> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his
>> heart
>> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating
>> from
>> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
>>
>> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
> afterwards
>> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might be
> for
>> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to
>> say
>> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
>
> How is his heart enlarged; in a ball shape or valentine-shape?

Will know after the X-ray tomorrow.

> His breathing difficulty might be due to pulmonary edema. Speak to your
> vet
> about a diuretic (furosemide/Lasix). If he prescribes a diuretic, mention
> a
> potassium supplement since rapid urine formation caused by diuretics
> increases potassium excretion and could lead to hypokalemia.

Will do.

> If I were you, I would consult a veterinary cardiologist.

I don't think we have them over here in the UK, certainly not where I live
which is about 100 miles from the nearest large City which is likely to have
a big vet practice (Manchester). Around here in Wales we just have smaller
vet practices with 1 or 2 vets, usually running the practice from their own
house.

--

Niel H

Phil P.
February 26th 06, 09:20 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> > message ...
> >> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my other
> > old
> >> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who thinks
> >> he
> >> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his
> >> heart
> >> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating
> >> from
> >> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
> >>
> >> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
> > afterwards
> >> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might
be
> > for
> >> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to
> >> say
> >> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
> >
> > How is his heart enlarged; in a ball shape or valentine-shape?
>
> Will know after the X-ray tomorrow.
>
> > His breathing difficulty might be due to pulmonary edema. Speak to your
> > vet
> > about a diuretic (furosemide/Lasix). If he prescribes a diuretic,
mention
> > a
> > potassium supplement since rapid urine formation caused by diuretics
> > increases potassium excretion and could lead to hypokalemia.
>
> Will do.
>
> > If I were you, I would consult a veterinary cardiologist.
>
> I don't think we have them over here in the UK, certainly not where I live
> which is about 100 miles from the nearest large City which is likely to
have
> a big vet practice (Manchester). Around here in Wales we just have smaller
> vet practices with 1 or 2 vets, usually running the practice from their
own
> house.

Ask your vet if he deals with an ultrasound service-- ultrasonographers that
travel around to local practices. An echocardiogram would be superior to an
x-ray.

Best of luck.

Phil.

Niel Humphreys
February 26th 06, 11:07 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> "Phil P." > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> >
>> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
>> > message ...
>> >> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my
>> >> other
>> > old
>> >> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who
>> >> thinks
>> >> he
>> >> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his
>> >> heart
>> >> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest beating
>> >> from
>> >> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
>> >>
>> >> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
>> > afterwards
>> >> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis might
> be
>> > for
>> >> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself to
>> >> say
>> >> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
>> >
>> > How is his heart enlarged; in a ball shape or valentine-shape?
>>
>> Will know after the X-ray tomorrow.
>>
>> > His breathing difficulty might be due to pulmonary edema. Speak to
>> > your
>> > vet
>> > about a diuretic (furosemide/Lasix). If he prescribes a diuretic,
> mention
>> > a
>> > potassium supplement since rapid urine formation caused by diuretics
>> > increases potassium excretion and could lead to hypokalemia.
>>
>> Will do.
>>
>> > If I were you, I would consult a veterinary cardiologist.
>>
>> I don't think we have them over here in the UK, certainly not where I
>> live
>> which is about 100 miles from the nearest large City which is likely to
> have
>> a big vet practice (Manchester). Around here in Wales we just have
>> smaller
>> vet practices with 1 or 2 vets, usually running the practice from their
> own
>> house.
>
> Ask your vet if he deals with an ultrasound service-- ultrasonographers
> that
> travel around to local practices. An echocardiogram would be superior to
> an
> x-ray.

Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see if the
X-Ray would provide al the information first.

> Best of luck.


Cheers.
--

Niel H

Phil P.
February 27th 06, 08:16 AM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> > message ...
> >> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> >> news:[email protected]
> >> >
> >> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote
in
> >> > message ...
> >> >> Never rains, just as we've got Q eating and not throwing it up my
> >> >> other
> >> > old
> >> >> boy 'Worf' had a fit yesterday. Took him straight to the vet who
> >> >> thinks
> >> >> he
> >> >> has something similar to asthma but more seriously it looks like his
> >> >> heart
> >> >> is enlarged and diseased - you can see the whole of his chest
beating
> >> >> from
> >> >> the outside. X-ray on Monday to find out more.
> >> >>
> >> >> Last night he had another gasping fit and was panting for a while
> >> > afterwards
> >> >> but seems OK this morning. Can anyone advise what the prognosis
might
> > be
> >> > for
> >> >> a cat with pretty bad heart problems - should I be preparing myself
to
> >> >> say
> >> >> bye bye to my friend of 14 years?
> >> >
> >> > How is his heart enlarged; in a ball shape or valentine-shape?
> >>
> >> Will know after the X-ray tomorrow.
> >>
> >> > His breathing difficulty might be due to pulmonary edema. Speak to
> >> > your
> >> > vet
> >> > about a diuretic (furosemide/Lasix). If he prescribes a diuretic,
> > mention
> >> > a
> >> > potassium supplement since rapid urine formation caused by diuretics
> >> > increases potassium excretion and could lead to hypokalemia.
> >>
> >> Will do.
> >>
> >> > If I were you, I would consult a veterinary cardiologist.
> >>
> >> I don't think we have them over here in the UK, certainly not where I
> >> live
> >> which is about 100 miles from the nearest large City which is likely to
> > have
> >> a big vet practice (Manchester). Around here in Wales we just have
> >> smaller
> >> vet practices with 1 or 2 vets, usually running the practice from their
> > own
> >> house.
> >
> > Ask your vet if he deals with an ultrasound service-- ultrasonographers
> > that
> > travel around to local practices. An echocardiogram would be superior to
> > an
> > x-ray.
>
> Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see if the
> X-Ray would provide al the information first.


Don't go by the x-rays alone- I've seen cats with HCM have normal x-rays as
well as normal ECGs. An echocardiogram is the best diagnostic tool for
heart disease in cats. An echo will also let you know if your cat is at
risk for aortic thromboembolism.

How's his breathing?

Phil

Niel Humphreys
February 27th 06, 11:54 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
>>
>> Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see if
>> the
>> X-Ray would provide al the information first.
>
>
> Don't go by the x-rays alone- I've seen cats with HCM have normal x-rays
> as
> well as normal ECGs. An echocardiogram is the best diagnostic tool for
> heart disease in cats. An echo will also let you know if your cat is at
> risk for aortic thromboembolism.

Just dropped him off and on the G.E. authority form the vet had stated he
was being put under for X-Ray, ECG and Endoscopy so he's getting all 3.

> How's his breathing?


It alternates between laboured and fine, laboured usually after a coughing
fit or trotting up the stairs. Last night he tried up jump onto the
cardboard box he likes to sleep on at night & it took 2 attempts, when he
got up there he was visibly panting & it's only about 2 feet high.. This
morning he was perfectly fine.

The vet said it seems like he has something akin to asthma at the initial
exam, I imagine this is what the endoscopy is for? Anyway I will know more
this afternoon but I have already decided I am not going to keep him alive
for my benefit just because I don't want him to die if it means he will be
in pain or have no real quality of life.
--

Niel H

Niel Humphreys
February 27th 06, 04:00 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
>>>
>>> Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see if
>>> the
>>> X-Ray would provide al the information first.
>>
>>
>> Don't go by the x-rays alone- I've seen cats with HCM have normal x-rays
>> as
>> well as normal ECGs. An echocardiogram is the best diagnostic tool for
>> heart disease in cats. An echo will also let you know if your cat is at
>> risk for aortic thromboembolism.
>
> Just dropped him off and on the G.E. authority form the vet had stated he
> was being put under for X-Ray, ECG and Endoscopy so he's getting all 3.
>
>> How's his breathing?
>
>
> It alternates between laboured and fine, laboured usually after a coughing
> fit or trotting up the stairs. Last night he tried up jump onto the
> cardboard box he likes to sleep on at night & it took 2 attempts, when he
> got up there he was visibly panting & it's only about 2 feet high.. This
> morning he was perfectly fine.
>
> The vet said it seems like he has something akin to asthma at the initial
> exam, I imagine this is what the endoscopy is for? Anyway I will know more
> this afternoon but I have already decided I am not going to keep him alive
> for my benefit just because I don't want him to die if it means he will be
> in pain or have no real quality of life.


Oh dear, it doesn't look good. Vet was out and I spoke to his wife who says
they want to keep him overnight to wait for the results of the ECG. She
sounded quite sad on the phone, not her usual self, so I am preparing myself
for bad news when I phone again this evening to speak to the vet himself.
--

Niel H

Niel Humphreys
February 27th 06, 07:05 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> "Phil P." > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>>
>>> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
>>>>
>>>> Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see if
>>>> the
>>>> X-Ray would provide al the information first.
>>>
>>>
>>> Don't go by the x-rays alone- I've seen cats with HCM have normal x-rays
>>> as
>>> well as normal ECGs. An echocardiogram is the best diagnostic tool for
>>> heart disease in cats. An echo will also let you know if your cat is at
>>> risk for aortic thromboembolism.
>>
>> Just dropped him off and on the G.E. authority form the vet had stated he
>> was being put under for X-Ray, ECG and Endoscopy so he's getting all 3.
>>
>>> How's his breathing?
>>
>>
>> It alternates between laboured and fine, laboured usually after a
>> coughing fit or trotting up the stairs. Last night he tried up jump onto
>> the cardboard box he likes to sleep on at night & it took 2 attempts,
>> when he got up there he was visibly panting & it's only about 2 feet
>> high.. This morning he was perfectly fine.
>>
>> The vet said it seems like he has something akin to asthma at the initial
>> exam, I imagine this is what the endoscopy is for? Anyway I will know
>> more this afternoon but I have already decided I am not going to keep him
>> alive for my benefit just because I don't want him to die if it means he
>> will be in pain or have no real quality of life.
>
>
> Oh dear, it doesn't look good. Vet was out and I spoke to his wife who
> says they want to keep him overnight to wait for the results of the ECG.
> She sounded quite sad on the phone, not her usual self, so I am preparing
> myself for bad news when I phone again this evening to speak to the vet
> himself.

Just spoke to the vet again. Worf has Cardio Myopathy so it's a case of
phoning the vet each day to see how whether he is responding to the
treatment or not. He's breathing a lot easier now since they drained a lot
of fluid from his chest where his lungs should have been. Guess it's fingers
crossed time.

--

Niel H

Phil P.
February 28th 06, 08:40 AM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
> > "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> > message ...
> >> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> >> news:[email protected]
> >>>
> >>> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote
in
> >>>>
> >>>> Ah, yes, he did mention the possibility of an ECG but wanted to see
if
> >>>> the
> >>>> X-Ray would provide al the information first.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Don't go by the x-rays alone- I've seen cats with HCM have normal
x-rays
> >>> as
> >>> well as normal ECGs. An echocardiogram is the best diagnostic tool
for
> >>> heart disease in cats. An echo will also let you know if your cat is
at
> >>> risk for aortic thromboembolism.
> >>
> >> Just dropped him off and on the G.E. authority form the vet had stated
he
> >> was being put under for X-Ray, ECG and Endoscopy so he's getting all 3.
> >>
> >>> How's his breathing?
> >>
> >>
> >> It alternates between laboured and fine, laboured usually after a
> >> coughing fit or trotting up the stairs. Last night he tried up jump
onto
> >> the cardboard box he likes to sleep on at night & it took 2 attempts,
> >> when he got up there he was visibly panting & it's only about 2 feet
> >> high.. This morning he was perfectly fine.
> >>
> >> The vet said it seems like he has something akin to asthma at the
initial
> >> exam, I imagine this is what the endoscopy is for? Anyway I will know
> >> more this afternoon but I have already decided I am not going to keep
him
> >> alive for my benefit just because I don't want him to die if it means
he
> >> will be in pain or have no real quality of life.
> >
> >
> > Oh dear, it doesn't look good. Vet was out and I spoke to his wife who
> > says they want to keep him overnight to wait for the results of the ECG.
> > She sounded quite sad on the phone, not her usual self, so I am
preparing
> > myself for bad news when I phone again this evening to speak to the vet
> > himself.
>
> Just spoke to the vet again. Worf has Cardio Myopathy so it's a case of
> phoning the vet each day to see how whether he is responding to the
> treatment or not. He's breathing a lot easier now since they drained a lot
> of fluid from his chest where his lungs should have been. Guess it's
fingers
> crossed time.


Niel,

Did your vet mention which type of cardiomyopathy Mr. Worf has? One form
of cardiomyopathy (dilated) often responds and even resolves with simple
taurine supplements. Did your vet prescribe a diuretic to help control
fluid build up?

It may not be as bad as you think. There are some truly wonder drugs for
treating feline heart diseases- especially hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy.

Keep the faith,

Phil

Niel Humphreys
February 28th 06, 01:51 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:P%[email protected]
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> Just spoke to the vet again. Worf has Cardio Myopathy so it's a case of
>> phoning the vet each day to see how whether he is responding to the
>> treatment or not. He's breathing a lot easier now since they drained a
>> lot
>> of fluid from his chest where his lungs should have been. Guess it's
> fingers
>> crossed time.
>
>
> Niel,
>
> Did your vet mention which type of cardiomyopathy Mr. Worf has? One form
> of cardiomyopathy (dilated) often responds and even resolves with simple
> taurine supplements. Did your vet prescribe a diuretic to help control
> fluid build up?

We didn't discuss much, he just said that he wants to keep him there and
make sure he gets the drugs (he has a knack for hiding pills and spitting
them out later) and enforced rest (from my hyperactive 1 year old kitts). I
assume he knows his stuff as he is very well thought of in the area so trust
his judgement.

Will ask him tonight when I phone in for a progress report.

> It may not be as bad as you think. There are some truly wonder drugs for
> treating feline heart diseases- especially hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy.

Hope so, I just hope we haven't caught it too late.
--

Niel H

Niel Humphreys
March 1st 06, 05:54 PM
Worfy's home. :o)

He responded very well to the treatment and I have just picked him up from
the vets. He has to take HyperCard coated tablets three times a day to
manage the cardiomyopathy but aside from a shortened lifespan the vet seems
happy that the disease is manageable.

Yay!!!

--

Niel H

cybercat
March 1st 06, 07:02 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> Worfy's home. :o)
>
> He responded very well to the treatment and I have just picked him up from
> the vets. He has to take HyperCard coated tablets three times a day to
> manage the cardiomyopathy but aside from a shortened lifespan the vet
seems
> happy that the disease is manageable.
>
> Yay!!!
>

Super, Niel. I was hoping your experience would be similar to mine
with my Boo. I could not be more pleased that it is. Do try pilling
Worfy as he is eating his canned food, if indeed you feed him
canned food. Doing this has turned a twice-daily battle into an
easy task. After she has taken a couple of bites of food, I toss
the pill to the very middle of the back of her throat and hold her
head up, gently stroking her throat until she shows me that she
swallowed. (I hold her head because she tries to shake it to get
the pill to the side where she can work it out with her tongue.)
There are actually times now when she does not even try to
spit it out, she just dutifully swallows so she can get her hungry
little face back in her food! Good luck with everything. May
Worfy have many healthy years.

Niel Humphreys
March 1st 06, 08:19 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
> message ...
>> Worfy's home. :o)
>>
>> He responded very well to the treatment and I have just picked him up
>> from
>> the vets. He has to take HyperCard coated tablets three times a day to
>> manage the cardiomyopathy but aside from a shortened lifespan the vet
> seems
>> happy that the disease is manageable.
>>
>> Yay!!!
>>
>
> Super, Niel. I was hoping your experience would be similar to mine
> with my Boo. I could not be more pleased that it is. Do try pilling
> Worfy as he is eating his canned food, if indeed you feed him
> canned food. Doing this has turned a twice-daily battle into an
> easy task. After she has taken a couple of bites of food, I toss
> the pill to the very middle of the back of her throat and hold her
> head up, gently stroking her throat until she shows me that she
> swallowed. (I hold her head because she tries to shake it to get
> the pill to the side where she can work it out with her tongue.)
> There are actually times now when she does not even try to
> spit it out, she just dutifully swallows so she can get her hungry
> little face back in her food! Good luck with everything. May
> Worfy have many healthy years.


Yea, that will be interesting, Worf is the master at hiding pills and then
scuttling off to spit them out somewhere. I imagine at 3 times a day he will
slowly get used to it. At least he's happy being handled and more or less
lets me do anything to him when lying on my lap. First one in a few hours so
will see how it goes. I free feed my cats with kibble so hiding a pill in a
chunk of wet isn't an option (tried it before anyway and he susses it
straight away).

Little Thor, one of the 1 year old 'twins' who long ago decided Worf's his
best friend had been following him around since he came back. Worf's a bit
of a lone cat so isnt too happy but always gives in - they're sleeping sort
of next to each other now under one of the radiators. lol
--

Niel H