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View Full Version : Re: Life Expenctancy of Main Coons


Claude V. Lucas
February 27th 06, 05:42 AM
In article >,
Margarita Salt > wrote:
>I was at PetsMart today and, silly me, looked at the adoptables. There
>was a card that said the resident's name was Kama (really!) and he was
>a main coon, 6 years old. I could see a cat tucked into its sleeping
>quarters, and tapped on the window trying to wake him up so I could
>see. Well, the tapping worked. I saw big yellow eyes light up and
>then what emerged from the den was a startlingly HUGE and BEAUTIFUL
>boy.
>
>That cat was 20 inches at the shoulder if he was an inch at all. He
>came right up to the window meowing, and rubbed on it, then looked over
>his shoulder like "whya ren't you petting me?" I mean this cat was
>HUGE! I have never seen a domestic this big. And he was so adorably
>sweet, I wanted to take him right home. Kami would have a fit and
>would not be able to do anything about it. He could make her nothing
>more than a pink smudge on the carpet.
>
>The more I thought it, the more I recalled that because of their size,
>coons don't live very long. At 6 years, he probably only had a a
>couple more years left. If Kami went tomorrow I would have to deal
>with it again much too soon.
>
>Is what I heard correct? Do main coons just not live very long?
>

I did a quick Google and read a couple MC FAQs that came up
and saw nothing that claimed a shorter life span overall
for the breed. At 6 he's barely done being a kitten. The
way that acted towards you is just like what Bubba did when
he adopted me at the shelter.

If that one is anything like Bubba I wouldn't worry about
him using his size to dominate a smaller cat. One day one
of the neighbor's little black kittens wandered in through
the open door and Bubba walked over to check it out. The
kitten was only about 1/10 Bubba's size but when the little
thing arched it's back and hissed, Bubba was off like he was
shot at and hid behind the couch. LOL...

He's really friendly with people but other cats all seem
to scare him and he doesn't seem to want to have much to
do with them. I don't know what he'd do if another cat got
aggro with him or backed him into a corner. He's *really*
strong and has big teeth... Overall he's pretty mellow and
easygoing so I think that he'd get used to another cat but
I don't know for sure.


Claude

Mathew Kagis
February 27th 06, 06:23 AM
"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Margarita Salt > wrote:
> >I was at PetsMart today and, silly me, looked at the adoptables. There
> >was a card that said the resident's name was Kama (really!) and he was
> >a main coon, 6 years old. I could see a cat tucked into its sleeping
> >quarters, and tapped on the window trying to wake him up so I could
> >see. Well, the tapping worked. I saw big yellow eyes light up and
> >then what emerged from the den was a startlingly HUGE and BEAUTIFUL
> >boy.
> >
> >That cat was 20 inches at the shoulder if he was an inch at all. He
> >came right up to the window meowing, and rubbed on it, then looked over
> >his shoulder like "whya ren't you petting me?" I mean this cat was
> >HUGE! I have never seen a domestic this big. And he was so adorably
> >sweet, I wanted to take him right home. Kami would have a fit and
> >would not be able to do anything about it. He could make her nothing
> >more than a pink smudge on the carpet.
> >
> >The more I thought it, the more I recalled that because of their size,
> >coons don't live very long. At 6 years, he probably only had a a
> >couple more years left. If Kami went tomorrow I would have to deal
> >with it again much too soon.
> >
> >Is what I heard correct? Do main coons just not live very long?
> >
>
> I did a quick Google and read a couple MC FAQs that came up
> and saw nothing that claimed a shorter life span overall
> for the breed. At 6 he's barely done being a kitten.

<SNIP>

Overall he's pretty mellow and
> easygoing so I think that he'd get used to another cat but
> I don't know for sure.
>
>
> Claude

I did a bunch of reasearch on MCs last year... My oldest, Chablis, has alot
of Maine Coon in her, although I don't know who her parents were & adopted
her sick, worm ridden little ass at the tender age of 7 weeks.

MCs live normal life spans, tend to get pretty big & don't stop growing
untill the age of 2 or better. Generally a very mellow breed, as Claude has
pointed out... Chablis is definitely the most accepting of new people &
situations of the three here... Beautifull cats... If your tempted, I think
you could do worse....

--
Mathew
Butler to 3 cats: Chablis, Muscat & Sage
En Vino Veritas


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Phil P.
February 27th 06, 08:15 AM
"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote in message
...

>
> I did a quick Google and read a couple MC FAQs that came up
> and saw nothing that claimed a shorter life span overall
> for the breed.

Certain families of Maine Coons carry a genetic mutation that causes
hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A DNA screening test has been developed by
UC-Davis that will identify Maine coon cats carrying the genetic mutation.

http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7533

http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/health/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy.html

Claude V. Lucas
February 27th 06, 08:51 AM
In article <[email protected]>, Phil P. > wrote:
>
>"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote in message
...
>
>>
>> I did a quick Google and read a couple MC FAQs that came up
>> and saw nothing that claimed a shorter life span overall
>> for the breed.
>
>Certain families of Maine Coons carry a genetic mutation that causes
>hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A DNA screening test has been developed by
>UC-Davis that will identify Maine coon cats carrying the genetic mutation.
>
>http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7533
>
>http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/health/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy.html
>

Thanks for the links.

One of the FAQ's I read, and I forget which one because I scanned
a couple of them one after another, said that this defect has largely
been bred out of the breed... That test will certainly help.

True?

None of the FAQs said anything about an overall shorter life span due
to that particular heart problem or anything else including the larger size.

I don't have to be concerned about Bubba passing that or any other
genes. I hope he isn't afflicted. He seems OK so far. I had him
checked by a vet when I got him, but no echocardiogram... I'm more
worried about him being so big in spite of short rations. Somebody
else mentioned the dangers of being overweight although I'm not sure
what "overweight" really means without being able to measure body
fat percentage and without knowing what percentage is appropriate
for a cat.

Thanks again

Claude

Phil P.
February 27th 06, 09:43 AM
"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote in message
...
> In article <[email protected]>, Phil P. >
wrote:
> >
> >"Claude V. Lucas" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> >>
> >> I did a quick Google and read a couple MC FAQs that came up
> >> and saw nothing that claimed a shorter life span overall
> >> for the breed.
> >
> >Certain families of Maine Coons carry a genetic mutation that causes
> >hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. A DNA screening test has been developed by
> >UC-Davis that will identify Maine coon cats carrying the genetic
mutation.
> >
> >http://www.news.ucdavis.edu/search/news_detail.lasso?id=7533
> >
> >http://www.winnfelinehealth.org/health/hypertrophic-cardiomyopathy.html
> >
>
> Thanks for the links.
>
> One of the FAQ's I read, and I forget which one because I scanned
> a couple of them one after another, said that this defect has largely
> been bred out of the breed... That test will certainly help.
>
> True?


No. HCM is still a major concern in Maine Coons.




>
> None of the FAQs said anything about an overall shorter life span due
> to that particular heart problem or anything else including the larger
size.



HCM can definitely have an affect on lifespan.



>
> I don't have to be concerned about Bubba passing that or any other
> genes. I hope he isn't afflicted. He seems OK so far. I had him
> checked by a vet when I got him, but no echocardiogram...


An echo can't detect the mutated gene if he's carrying it. You can order a
DNA test kit from Washington State's Veterinary Cardiac Genetics Lab- its a
very simple test. All you have to do is collect a cell sample from inside
his cheek with a small brush that comes with the kit and send it back to the
lab. It only costs $60.




I'm more
> worried about him being so big in spite of short rations. Somebody
> else mentioned the dangers of being overweight although I'm not sure
> what "overweight" really means without being able to measure body
> fat percentage and without knowing what percentage is appropriate
> for a cat.

Body Condition Score is used to determine whether or not a cat is
overweight:

http://www.maxshouse.com/nutrition/Body_Scoring_System-Chart.jpg


Good luck,

Phil

Buddy
February 27th 06, 11:07 AM
I adopted a Maine Coon from a shelter a year ago - he was three when I
got him - or I should say when he chose me - he acted just like the one
acted with you. He is the most laid back cat I have ever seen and
don't regret adopting him.

I think that MC's do tend to gain weight easily. My vet said that most
MC owners THINK the cats should be big and overfeed them. So, as in
humans, diabetes goes along with being overweight. I think that mine
is pet quality and not show - he is a bit smaller than most. Probably
the runt of the litter. I have trouble keeping him at 11 pounds. He
has a very small mouth and small teeth, but big fluffy feet.

He never begs for food or acts like that is what is on his mind, but he
will eat as much as you offer. So you have to watch the quantity you
give.

February 27th 06, 11:34 AM
Buddy wrote:
> I adopted a Maine Coon from a shelter a year ago - he was three when I
> got him - or I should say when he chose me - he acted just like the one
> acted with you. He is the most laid back cat I have ever seen and
> don't regret adopting him.
>

I adopted a cat last year who is probably part maine coon and/or part
ragdoll. The size and temperment is described the same for both. He has
the look of the ragdoll, but talks like a maine coon. He's a big boy,
but small for both breeds.

When I got him, they said he was 3-4 years old, but I think it was a
guess because of his size. He was 12 1/2 pounds when I got him, gained
weight like crazy (changed his food), settled down, lost weight, and is
now a healthy 16.4 lbs. His photos taken last August (taken 6 months
after I adopted him) are very different from his current photos. He
looks immature. Back then, he didn't seem that way. But he's thicker
now, especially in the face, and he just looks more like a kitten in
those photos. A couple judges and some breeders at a cat show also
commented on it when I asked their opinion of his breed. So, we decided
he must have been only 1 year to 2 years old when I got him. Great for
me - I'll get to enjoy him longer!



> I think that MC's do tend to gain weight easily. My vet said that most
> MC owners THINK the cats should be big and overfeed them.

When I got Jay Jay, he gained weight liek crazy. Partly because he was
a stray and not used to food available 24/7. I had to restrict his
food. But he was still gaining. Even on the lite stuff. Then I switched
his food to Royal Canon's maine coon food. I was actually trying to
eliminate the stinky poo. But the food also caused him to lose weight
and stablize. The kibbles are larger, so he has to put some effort into
chewing it. He went from inhaling it to being satisfied on less food.
He went from 12.5 to 19, and back down to 16.4 pounds. And I can free
feed him now. I took him to theshow last week in the household pet
class. Several judges commented on his good condition. Unfortunately,
he hissed at most of the judges, so he only got a ribbon in one ring
(before he got mad and started hissing).

http://www.zoocrewphoto.com/cats/jayjay.jpg

This photo was taken in December. I'll get out the one taken in August.

Buddy
February 27th 06, 01:09 PM
Wow - he's a beauty! Here is my funny guy:

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~colonialamerica/2.jpg

He loves having pictures taken and poses for the camera. Which shows
his personality.

He has never hissed in the year that I have had him. Not even going to
the vet and getting shots.

March 1st 06, 09:13 AM
Buddy wrote:
> Wow - he's a beauty! Here is my funny guy:
>
> http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~colonialamerica/2.jpg
>
> He loves having pictures taken and poses for the camera. Which shows
> his personality.
>
> He has never hissed in the year that I have had him. Not even going to
> the vet and getting shots.

Jay Jay hasn't figured out the camera yet. He still pouts and doesn't
seem to understand I want lots of photos of him. He picked me, but he
hasn't quite figured out what it means to choose the home of a
photographer.

Chase is the ham around here. I have to lock him out of the room if I
want photos of somebody else.

Jay Jay has been a true gentle giant, very meek, and not agressive at
all. He hissed at one of the dogs the first day, and that was about it.
I never saw him hiss after that. And never a growl. I really believe he
thought he was in a fight to save his home, and decided to take drastic
measures.

He's been prefectly normal and happy at home. It's hard to believe that
those hisses and that growl actually occurred.