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such
February 27th 06, 07:14 PM
I have a dog who has access to a fenced backyard through a pet door. I
recently got a 4 month old kitten. He gets along well with the dog, &
has been declawed & chipped. We want to keep him indoors but lately he
has figured out how to use the pet door & get out. We are afraid he
might go under or in between the fence & run away or get lost. We are
out of the house 10 hours a day so we can't leave the pet door closed.
What can we do to prevent this?
Will appreciate your advice.

PawsForThought
February 27th 06, 07:28 PM
such wrote:
> I have a dog who has access to a fenced backyard through a pet door. I
> recently got a 4 month old kitten. He gets along well with the dog, &
> has been declawed & chipped. We want to keep him indoors but lately he
> has figured out how to use the pet door & get out. We are afraid he
> might go under or in between the fence & run away or get lost. We are
> out of the house 10 hours a day so we can't leave the pet door closed.
> What can we do to prevent this?
> Will appreciate your advice.

A declawed cat should never be allowed out. I highly recommend
removing that pet door. Meanwhile, it would be a good idea to do some
research to learn how painful and horrible declawing a cat is. It is
not just the removal of the claw, but rather the third digit of each
toe is also amputated. Cats are digitigrade, meaning they walk on the
tips of their toes, the tips that were amputated. Cats also use their
claws to exercise their neck, shoulder and back muscles. When they use
a scratching post, they dig their claws in and pull back, that's how
they achieve the exercise. Declawed cats cannot do this.

such
February 27th 06, 07:48 PM
I adopted this cat from a shelter.

PawsForThought
February 27th 06, 08:10 PM
such wrote:
> I adopted this cat from a shelter.

Congrats :) But I would really get rid of the pet door if he's already
figured it out. I've heard some real horror stories about declawed
cats who got out. Alternatively, I've heard of pet doors that have a
transmitter on the door and I believe the dog wears one on a collar.
Maybe that would work?

NMR
February 27th 06, 08:10 PM
Hello such My name is Matthew aka NMR Just an upfront warning declawing
is a very sore and major talked about subject in this group. Please don't
take a offense if someone voices their opinion on it. Mine is I won't do it
unless medical necessary. Thank you for clarifying that you got the cat
the way he was If I am reading correctly. If not Paws provide some great
info for future reference of declawing an animal.

Please understand this IMO ( in my opinion ) allowing a cat outside is very
dangerous and potential hazardous under any circumstance specially declawed.
Cats can live and do live perfectly natural lives inside the home. There is
plenty of information that one of us can provide on keeping your cat the
essential for a happy life. A companion is a start.

But here are some ideas for you

A idea you can do is get the pet door that requires a electronically collar
to open and close. Than you only have to worry about is the other animal
keeping the pet door open like some dogs do by standing in them.

Electronically invisible fence. The animal wears a collar that prevents
them from going past a certain point in the yard boundaries defined by you.
If you do this make sure that animal can have an escape route if a predator
enters the yard

The cat stay away spray can be sprayed by the pet door

You can also eliminate the pet door completely and make a permanent
environment protected shelter for your dog outside. Which when you are away
from the house you don't have to worry about accidents or potential home
break-ins. Dogs can be trained a lot easier than a cat can. So if you keep
your dog in at night accidents can be kept to a bare minimal if the animal
is used to coming and going freely.

Hope these help any other questions Please fell free to ask

Matthew

"such" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I adopted this cat from a shelter.
>

Joe Canuck
February 27th 06, 09:00 PM
such wrote:
> I have a dog who has access to a fenced backyard through a pet door. I
> recently got a 4 month old kitten. He gets along well with the dog, &
> has been declawed & chipped. We want to keep him indoors but lately he
> has figured out how to use the pet door & get out. We are afraid he
> might go under or in between the fence & run away or get lost. We are
> out of the house 10 hours a day so we can't leave the pet door closed.
> What can we do to prevent this?
> Will appreciate your advice.
>

Declaw and letting the cat out are both bad.

Since you have removed its primary defense system, don't let the cat
outside under any circumstances.

Joe Canuck
February 27th 06, 09:06 PM
such wrote:
> I do want to keep the cat indoors. My previous cat was allowed to sit
> in the patio, but eventually ran away & was never found. I am thinking
> of getting Innotek Zones Cordless Instant Pet Barrier. Has anyone used
> this product? Any idea how heavy it is for a cat's collar?
>

Ok, I understand you received the cat already declawed... however please
don't take any chances with him/her.

If your cat should happen to escape it will be in for a very rough time
without claws.

Spot
February 27th 06, 11:43 PM
I haven't used this system but have looked at the ads for it.

They also make dog doors that are only open for the dog who wears the remote
collar that goes with that door. So if another dog trys to come in or out
the door won't open. This might be an option also. Of course it may not
keep the cat from slipping out behind the dog depending upon how clever your
cat is. I would be more inclinded to go with the innoteck product and zone
the cat out of the room that has the dog door.

Celeste



"such" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I do want to keep the cat indoors. My previous cat was allowed to sit
> in the patio, but eventually ran away & was never found. I am thinking
> of getting Innotek Zones Cordless Instant Pet Barrier. Has anyone used
> this product? Any idea how heavy it is for a cat's collar?
>

NMR
February 28th 06, 02:16 AM
ROFLMAO

Good one D
"D." > wrote in message
ink.net...
> In article >,
> Margarita Salt > wrote:
>
>> Shut up and sit down already.
>
> I would suggest that, if you are going to criticise others for
> "immaturity," you set an example. This isn't it. Just a thought.
>
> --
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.blogspot.com/

Morgen
February 28th 06, 04:32 PM
I was thinking about keeping the dog outside during the day also. The
electronic doors do keep predators - and people - out, but the dog
might "assist" the cat in going outside.

I got my Princess already declawed, also. I take heat for it, but she
has a safe, indoor home and rules the cat with claws very nicely. I
think in her case it was because she was companion to a bedridden
person who passed away. In any case, your baby without claws is
defenseless outdoors, so should be kept indoors.

If you can train her to a leash, and take her out once in a while with
you, that would be wonderful for her. Alternatively, you could put a
fully-enclosed outdoor safe zone up and allow both animals to use it.
It could have indoor access from the pet door, and with a gate
somewhere on the perimeter, you could let the dog out yourself
occasionally. The gate would also help with cleanup.