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March 11th 06, 02:17 PM
I have 3 semi-feral cats who have lived in a small shed for the past 5
years. I want to bring them indoors with my one cat. These outdoor
cats have always had good care and yearly vet visits. But I am
concerned about bringing them indoors and the terror they will go
through during this process. What if they escape my home and run
outdoors and leave the area???? I would never be able to get them back
then!!!! They do not use litter boxes...(I have left them in their
shed and they just look at it)...so how could I train them to use a
litter box, also?

Whiplash
March 11th 06, 02:24 PM
wrote:
> I have 3 semi-feral cats who have lived in a small shed for the past 5
> ...(I have left them in their
> shed and they just look at it)...so how could I train them to use a
> litter box, also?

sounds like trouble to me

NanCe via CatKB.com
March 11th 06, 11:21 PM
>I have 3 semi-feral cats who have lived in a small shed for the past 5
>years. I want to bring them indoors with my one cat. These outdoor
>cats have always had good care and yearly vet visits. But I am
>concerned about bringing them indoors and the terror they will go
>through during this process. What if they escape my home and run
>outdoors and leave the area???? I would never be able to get them back
>then!!!! They do not use litter boxes...(I have left them in their
>shed and they just look at it)...so how could I train them to use a
>litter box, also?

I don't think they would leave the area if they got out again as that is
where their food is. First of all, make sure you have them spayed and
neutured (I've seen ferals calm down more once spayed and neutured) and their
shots are up to date. They won't escape your home if you put them in a room
with a closed door at first.

Try placing their food bowl closer and closer to the house. Eventually open
the door and bring the bowl into the opening of your house; they should walk
into your house and start eating. See how they react then. Try closing the
door behind them while they're eating and see what they do. You will have to
do all of this very slowly. Don't be surprised if they're extremely scared
and skittish, that's normal.

The only problem with doing it this way is that it may be hard for you to get
them into the room that you wan't them to stay in. It may be easier to bring
carriers outside and put them into them, then bring them into the house and
bring them into the assigned room. Have everything set up in there - the
litter box (don't put the box near the food), food, towels or blanket. After
shutting the door to the room behind you, open the carriers; I've seen ferals
try to run UP walls the first time they were brought inside - scary at first
but once they got used to being in the room, everything was fine. Don't
panic if they do this, just make sure there's nothing in the room they can
hurt themselves on. After a while, they'll calm down.

Your present cat will need time to get used to them which is one reason why
they should be in their own room. The whole run of the house would be too
much on them at first too. You can give them a towel to sleep on and then
bring it out to your present cat and let her get used to their scent and vice
versa. It's going to take a very long time; you will need to have lots of
patience. *Don't* try and rush the introductions. This will be stressful
for your present cat and she will need lots of extra attention too.

They will learn to use the litter box if you provide one to them in the room.
I think it is basically a natural instinct for them to want to go into a box
of litter rather than on your floor. They don't use the box outside in the
shed because they are going elsewhere outside.

Give them lots of yummy food - if they're used to dry, try canned too. If
they like it and eat enough of it, it'll make them more sleepy and relaxed.
Try some treats too like tuna or salmon or some chicken. Go in and sit with
them and pet them to get them used to you, but don't force it on them. Could
try some soothing soft music on a radio too to relax them - we used to put
it on country at the shelter I used to work at. There's always classical too
but some of that stuff can be booming.

It's great of you to do this, I hope everything works out okay.


NanCe

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200603/1

Rhonda
March 12th 06, 05:43 AM
Hi there,

Are all of the cats fixed? That's a first step to helping them use the
litter box (among other things...)

It sounds like you're able to catch them, so that's half the battle. It
will take them time to adjust but the cats we've brought in have
adjusted pretty well. One cat took a couple of weeks before he didn't
beg to go outside all of the time, but the others spent their energy
trying to figure out where they were and where can they hide!

Expect for them to hide in any dark cubby hole they can find for awhile.
You might set a room up for them with a closet that they can access. Let
them hide for a day or two and then sit in the room with them and talk
to them. If they know you, they'll feel more comfortable after you spend
some time with them. Use treats, too. The way to cats' hearts is through
their stomach!

I've heard that people have put dirt in litter boxes when bringing in an
outdoor cat. I haven't tried that. We had one cat sequestered in our
bathroom and she left her calling card in the sink. We picked it up with
paper and put it in the litter box and she never missed after that.
They're pretty quick about figuring it out.

I wouldn't worry about them running away. If they do get out, they'll
stay in the area. This is their turf, they'll know it as home.

That's wonderful of you to bring these guys in. It will all be worth it
when you see them lounging around your house.

Good luck!

Rhonda


wrote:

> I have 3 semi-feral cats who have lived in a small shed for the past 5
> years. I want to bring them indoors with my one cat. These outdoor
> cats have always had good care and yearly vet visits. But I am
> concerned about bringing them indoors and the terror they will go
> through during this process. What if they escape my home and run
> outdoors and leave the area???? I would never be able to get them back
> then!!!! They do not use litter boxes...(I have left them in their
> shed and they just look at it)...so how could I train them to use a
> litter box, also?
>
>

Sherri
March 12th 06, 09:08 PM
Have the 3 semi-feral cats been tested for FeLV and FIV?

Ron Herfurth
March 13th 06, 02:13 PM
"NanCe via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> >I have 3 semi-feral cats who have lived in a small shed for the past 5
> >years. I want to bring them indoors with my one cat. These outdoor
> >cats have always had good care and yearly vet visits. But I am
> >concerned about bringing them indoors and the terror they will go
> >through during this process. What if they escape my home and run
> >outdoors and leave the area???? I would never be able to get them back
> >then!!!! They do not use litter boxes...(I have left them in their
> >shed and they just look at it)...so how could I train them to use a
> >litter box, also?
>
> I don't think they would leave the area if they got out again as that is
> where their food is. First of all, make sure you have them spayed and
> neutured (I've seen ferals calm down more once spayed and neutured) and
their
> shots are up to date. They won't escape your home if you put them in a
room
> with a closed door at first.
>
> Try placing their food bowl closer and closer to the house. Eventually
open
> the door and bring the bowl into the opening of your house; they should
walk
> into your house and start eating. See how they react then. Try closing
the
> door behind them while they're eating and see what they do. You will have
to
> do all of this very slowly. Don't be surprised if they're extremely
scared
> and skittish, that's normal.
>
> The only problem with doing it this way is that it may be hard for you to
get
> them into the room that you wan't them to stay in. It may be easier to
bring
> carriers outside and put them into them, then bring them into the house
and
> bring them into the assigned room. Have everything set up in there - the
> litter box (don't put the box near the food), food, towels or blanket.
After
> shutting the door to the room behind you, open the carriers; I've seen
ferals
> try to run UP walls the first time they were brought inside - scary at
first
> but once they got used to being in the room, everything was fine.


All mine have doen the window dance. They don't know what glass is so they
think they can jump out where thet see daylight.
$15 cat beds may be a great investment, if not get some card board boxes
they can curl up in. Copy paper boxes work great.

Put newspaper in every corner; where ever they use the paper, put a litter
pan there. They're basically saying "I want to use THAT spot". If you were
designing a house you'd tell the architect where you wanted the bathroom,
right? Your new cats are telling you where they want the bathroom.

ron
been there, doen that
made every mistake that can possible be made - twice


Don't
> panic if they do this, just make sure there's nothing in the room they can
> hurt themselves on. After a while, they'll calm down.
>
> Your present cat will need time to get used to them which is one reason
why
> they should be in their own room. The whole run of the house would be too
> much on them at first too. You can give them a towel to sleep on and then
> bring it out to your present cat and let her get used to their scent and
vice
> versa. It's going to take a very long time; you will need to have lots of
> patience. *Don't* try and rush the introductions. This will be stressful
> for your present cat and she will need lots of extra attention too.
>
> They will learn to use the litter box if you provide one to them in the
room.
> I think it is basically a natural instinct for them to want to go into a
box
> of litter rather than on your floor. They don't use the box outside in
the
> shed because they are going elsewhere outside.
>
> Give them lots of yummy food - if they're used to dry, try canned too. If
> they like it and eat enough of it, it'll make them more sleepy and
relaxed.
> Try some treats too like tuna or salmon or some chicken. Go in and sit
with
> them and pet them to get them used to you, but don't force it on them.
Could
> try some soothing soft music on a radio too to relax them - we used to
put
> it on country at the shelter I used to work at. There's always classical
too
> but some of that stuff can be booming.
>
> It's great of you to do this, I hope everything works out okay.
>
>
> NanCe
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200603/1