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Phil P.
March 17th 06, 04:53 PM
"helmsman" > wrote in message
...
> The vet says our cat has Cardiomyopathy.
> It seemed to come on in 2 days.
> Scouts weight hasn't changed in over 2 years.
> We took Scout to the vet.
> The vet did:
> weight
> physical exam
> Major blood screen
> urine analysis
> 2 Radiographs/interpretation
> Electrocardiogram-routine
> Cytology (microscopic descrip)
> Tap thorax
> Drain thoracic fluid
>
> "They couldn't drain to much as the stuff is around his lungs and not
> in his lungs."


Did your vet prescribe a diuretic such as furosemide (a/k/a Lasix) to
control the fluid (pulmonary edema)? If not, you might want to ask him
about it. Furosemide should help your cat breathe easier by getting rid of
fluid in and around your cat's heart and lungs . After the intital fluid
resolves, your vet should instruct you to taper the dose to just enough to
control edema. You want to keep the dose as low as possible and make sure
your cat stays well hydrated-- cats can become dehydrated quickly when
taking furosemide. Also, if your vet does prescribe a diuretic, be sure to
ask him about a potassium supplement. Diuretics causes rapid urine
production which in turn increases potassium excretion.


>
> We are giving him "Enacard 2.5 MG Tablets"


Most vet cardiologists that I know or have read use Diltiazem (Cardizem,
Dilicor) as the first-choice drug for cats with HCM. Among the other
numerous benefits of diltiazem- it might also reduce the risk of aortic
thromboembolism (saddle thrombus) which is the most devastating complication
associated with HCM in cats. Diltiazem also reverses hypertrophy in the left
atrium in some cats. So, you might want to ask your vet about it-- or seek
as second opinion from a veterinary cardiologist.

Enacard is an ACE inhibitor and would be a good choice if your cat is in
CHF. Enacard also helps reduce diuretic-induced potassium depletion.


>
> Any ideas?
> Please and thanks.

My best advice would be to have an echocardiogram done- Electrocardiograms
(EKG/ECG) can't distinguish the different forms of cardiomyopathy- or
hyperthyroidism from cardiomyopathy. An echo will also let you know the
severity of your cat's condition- and if he actually has some form of
cardiomyopathy.

Best of luck,

Phil

Candace
April 5th 06, 02:49 AM
helmsman wrote:

> Scout had to be put down at 21.05 UTC 4-4-2006.
> All the tests were done twice, but to no evail.
> We buried him in the back yard next to his teacher and companion "TC".
> Our hearts are breaking.
> Our last cat Dolly knows he is gone as we brought Scout in the house
> and laid him in his blanket for his final brushing.
> Thanks again to everyone who helped.

I'm very sorry. You did all that was possible and Scout knew he was
loved.

Candace

Lesley
April 5th 06, 10:51 AM
> >
> Scout had to be put down at 21.05 UTC 4-4-2006.
> All the tests were done twice, but to no evail.
> We buried him in the back yard next to his teacher and companion "TC".
> Our hearts are breaking.
> Our last cat Dolly knows he is gone as we brought Scout in the house
> and laid him in his blanket for his final brushing.
> Thanks again to everyone who helped.

I am so sorry to hear this

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs