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Charlie Wilkes
March 21st 06, 10:26 PM
On 21 Mar 2006 18:17:09 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> wrote:

>But then I'm not allowed to discuss Kami's health issue in this
>newsgroup, so I'll vent with normal, logical, and reasonable people
>off-topic in some other one.

Oh, come on. What happened?

Charlie

cybercat
March 21st 06, 11:35 PM
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On 21 Mar 2006 18:17:09 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> > wrote:
>
> >But then I'm not allowed to discuss Kami's health issue in this
> >newsgroup, so I'll vent with normal, logical, and reasonable people
> >off-topic in some other one.
>
> Oh, come on. What happened?
>

*G*

-L.
March 22nd 06, 12:01 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On 21 Mar 2006 18:17:09 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> > > wrote:
> >
> > >But then I'm not allowed to discuss Kami's health issue in this
> > >newsgroup, so I'll vent with normal, logical, and reasonable people
> > >off-topic in some other one.
> >
> > Oh, come on. What happened?
> >
>
> *G*

Sigh. They're both so predictable...

-L.

Charlie Wilkes
March 22nd 06, 01:21 AM
On 21 Mar 2006 23:23:56 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> wrote:
>
>We'll keep on plugging. Viva la SpotBot.

I'm glad she's feeling better.

As for the eating thing... my neighbors had a cat that lived to be
about 23. The last year of its life, they had to cook special meals
for it, just to get it to eat. Lord they fussed over that cat.

Charlie

cybercat
March 22nd 06, 01:26 AM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> cybercat wrote:
> > "Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > On 21 Mar 2006 18:17:09 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> > > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >But then I'm not allowed to discuss Kami's health issue in this
> > > >newsgroup, so I'll vent with normal, logical, and reasonable people
> > > >off-topic in some other one.
> > >
> > > Oh, come on. What happened?
> > >
> >
> > *G*
>
> Sigh. They're both so predictable...
>

Yeah. But at least Charlie is up front--"intellectually honest," as he says.
:)

Joe Canuck
March 22nd 06, 01:30 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> cybercat wrote:
>>> "Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> On 21 Mar 2006 18:17:09 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
>>>> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> But then I'm not allowed to discuss Kami's health issue in this
>>>>> newsgroup, so I'll vent with normal, logical, and reasonable people
>>>>> off-topic in some other one.
>>>> Oh, come on. What happened?
>>>>
>>> *G*
>> Sigh. They're both so predictable...
>>
>
> Yeah. But at least Charlie is up front--"intellectually honest," as he says.
> :)
>
>

On the newsgroups, Charlie is whatever he says he is... which doesn't
necessarily reflect reality.

-L.
March 22nd 06, 05:29 AM
cybercat wrote:
>
> Yeah. But at least Charlie is up front--"intellectually honest," as he says.
> :)

Now, now, that's not fair to ole Cumbucket. One first has to have
intellect in order to be honest with it...;)

-L.

Charlie Wilkes
March 23rd 06, 12:34 AM
On 22 Mar 2006 16:28:20 GMT, Brandy Alexandre
> wrote:


>See? I think Dr. Greg was just interested in doing the expensive
>thing and if that didn't work THEN something else. It just made me
>suspicious and I'm glad I wrote Tina. I'm also glad that she's so
>willing to get and respond to emails.

Yeah. Isn't it amazing how many professional people DON'T use email?
One would think they could save a lot of time.
>
>It's funny. I'm not being fought on the pills. I'm wondering if
>Kami's getting a clue.

I'll bet she is just getting used to it. Animals are pretty
adaptable, more than people give them credit for, I think.

Charlie

Rhonda
March 23rd 06, 08:10 AM
I've thought about that in the past regarding vets -- and I think it's a
time-saver for them NOT to have email. There are so many things that
have come up with our animals that I would have sent off an emailed
question to a vet. Since mine don't have email, I either try to find the
answer myself (usually on the web) or I call the receptionist. Many
times, she yells back to the vet or to a vet tech and just tells me over
the phone.

If the vet had to stop and type out answers to numerous emails, I think
that could take up a big portion of their day.

Having worked for one of the f-500 companies, there is so much time
wasted with emails. Many times it's a great thing to reach someone
instantly, but typing out answers to endless back and forth emails drove
me crazy (yep, that's what did it.) Lots of times after about the 3rd
round on one subject and facing another question of "what about this?",
I'd pick up the phone and call them.

Rhonda

Charlie Wilkes wrote:

>
> Yeah. Isn't it amazing how many professional people DON'T use email?
> One would think they could save a lot of time.

Joe Canuck
March 23rd 06, 01:15 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> I've thought about that in the past regarding vets -- and I think it's a
> time-saver for them NOT to have email. There are so many things that
> have come up with our animals that I would have sent off an emailed
> question to a vet. Since mine don't have email, I either try to find the
> answer myself (usually on the web) or I call the receptionist. Many
> times, she yells back to the vet or to a vet tech and just tells me over
> the phone.
>
> If the vet had to stop and type out answers to numerous emails, I think
> that could take up a big portion of their day.
>
> Having worked for one of the f-500 companies, there is so much time
> wasted with emails. Many times it's a great thing to reach someone
> instantly, but typing out answers to endless back and forth emails drove
> me crazy (yep, that's what did it.) Lots of times after about the 3rd
> round on one subject and facing another question of "what about this?",
> I'd pick up the phone and call them.
>
> Rhonda
>
> Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>
>>
>> Yeah. Isn't it amazing how many professional people DON'T use email?
>> One would think they could save a lot of time.
>

Email and the diagnosis and delivery of medical information don't
exactly go hand-in-hand.

Usually, the vet needs to see the animal and make a determination on the
basis of first hand observance rather than email information.

Agreed, email can be a huge time waster.

Charlie Wilkes
March 23rd 06, 11:57 PM
On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 08:10:56 GMT, Rhonda >
wrote:

>I've thought about that in the past regarding vets -- and I think it's a
>time-saver for them NOT to have email. There are so many things that
>have come up with our animals that I would have sent off an emailed
>question to a vet. Since mine don't have email, I either try to find the
>answer myself (usually on the web) or I call the receptionist. Many
>times, she yells back to the vet or to a vet tech and just tells me over
>the phone.
>
>If the vet had to stop and type out answers to numerous emails, I think
>that could take up a big portion of their day.
>
>Having worked for one of the f-500 companies, there is so much time
>wasted with emails. Many times it's a great thing to reach someone
>instantly, but typing out answers to endless back and forth emails drove
> me crazy (yep, that's what did it.) Lots of times after about the 3rd
>round on one subject and facing another question of "what about this?",
>I'd pick up the phone and call them.

I guess so. Sometimes I think it's easier to shoot out an email than
return a call, however.

Charlie

Charlie Wilkes
March 24th 06, 07:01 AM
On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 14:14:28 GMT, "D." >
wrote:

>In article >,
> Joe Canuck > wrote:
>
>> Usually, the vet needs to see the animal and make a determination on the
>> basis of first hand observance rather than email information.
>
>I call my doctor and tell him I have what feels like a blocked ear; a
>friend convinces me it's a simple ear infection, which sounds
>reasonable. The doctor has me come in for an appointment, looks around,
>sends me to an audiologist for a hearing test. The audiologist tells me
>I have a raging ear infection in the blocked ear (mechanical hearing
>loss) and sensorineural hearing loss in both (previously unnoticed),
>more severe in the blocked ear than in the other. She sends me to an
>ENT. He tells me it's not an infection, but clear fluid because of
>eustachian tube dysfunction -- something is blocking the tube and the
>fluid from draining as it normally would. He looks at it via my nose and
>doesn't like what he sees. He has an MRI done and ends up performing
>both a biopsy (in case the blockage is a tumor) and a tube placement. He
>also suggests hearing aids, at least in the future if not now.
>
>And all because my ear felt blocked.

I think you have been mis-diagnosed, because the MDs are not taking
into account that you are the world's foremost expert on everything.

All that knowledge has to fit somewhere, Diane. It is putting
tremendous pressure on your brain, which is swelling and putting
pressure on your ears. It's like a big fat goiter inside your skull.
Next, your eyeballs will start to bulge, and you'll look like Marge
Simpson with Jeri Curls.

And then... Ever see "Scanners"? The guy was giving a speech, and the
pressure built up, and all of a sudden, BLAM! His head just exploded
into little blobs of bloody flesh and bone.

The secret to a long life in your particular situation, Diane, is to
offload some knowledge. Start by shedding the knowledge that you
pulled out of your big fat ass, without having any information to go
on... like your knowledge of reality TV, for example.
>
>I can't imagine a medical professional trying to practice by e-mail.

Oh, I think it's a perfectly fine idea. They could have little
sensors that you tape all over your body, and you would sit in front
of a web cam totally nude. "Good morning, Diane. How's that Jurassic
Beaver? Are the defossilizing pills working?"

Charlie