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catsarecool
March 28th 06, 03:11 AM
Is there some research to show benefits of these organics or disadvantages
of off-the-shelf foods?
What is your opinion?
many thanks

March 28th 06, 04:07 PM
Testimony is often the best proof. My sister's two feral rescues were
2 years old when they came to her from a no-kill shelter, where they'd
lived since they were kittens. They were being well cared for and fed
plenty of commercial food at the shelter. After two weeks on organic
raw food these adult cats actually started growing in size. Their
teeth and eyes cleared, no more bad breath, silkier coats, and what
came out of them completely changed in ...well, stinkiness. As in much
less stinky. Of course now they're trying to keep up with them,
they've got so much energy.

A cat's natural diet does not include fillers, chemicals, and
preservatives. With an organic, species-appropriate diet, they do
thrive. My sister's cases are just one example. I've seen this
without fail a minimum of 30 times. Every cat has also gone through a
detox period of about 1-2 weeks where everything gets stinkier, etc.
and then it's like they've peeled off a dingy film and everything about
them shines.

Joe Canuck
March 28th 06, 04:10 PM
wrote:
> Testimony is often the best proof. My sister's two feral rescues were
> 2 years old when they came to her from a no-kill shelter, where they'd
> lived since they were kittens. They were being well cared for and fed
> plenty of commercial food at the shelter. After two weeks on organic
> raw food these adult cats actually started growing in size. Their
> teeth and eyes cleared, no more bad breath, silkier coats, and what
> came out of them completely changed in ...well, stinkiness. As in much
> less stinky. Of course now they're trying to keep up with them,
> they've got so much energy.
>
> A cat's natural diet does not include fillers, chemicals, and
> preservatives. With an organic, species-appropriate diet, they do
> thrive. My sister's cases are just one example. I've seen this
> without fail a minimum of 30 times. Every cat has also gone through a
> detox period of about 1-2 weeks where everything gets stinkier, etc.
> and then it's like they've peeled off a dingy film and everything about
> them shines.
>

We should worry so much about the food WE consume.

Joe Negron
March 28th 06, 05:28 PM
On 2006-03-28, Joe Canuck > wrote:
wrote:
>>[...]
>>
>>A cat's natural diet does not include fillers, chemicals, and
>>preservatives. With an organic, species-appropriate diet, they do
>>thrive. My sister's cases are just one example. I've seen this
>>without fail a minimum of 30 times. Every cat has also gone through a
>>detox period of about 1-2 weeks where everything gets stinkier, etc.
>>and then it's like they've peeled off a dingy film and everything about
>>them shines.
>
>We should worry so much about the food WE consume.

We do, which is why my wife and I have been eating exclusively organic
food (except for the occasional take-out or restaurant meal) for about
the last seven and a half years. Better for us, better for the planet,
etc.

I've never seen organic cat food. Romeo has been eating Iams almost
since we got him over nine years ago. He seems to like it.

--
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Love of beauty is Taste...The creation of beauty is Art.

--Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Joe Negron from Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, NY, USA

PawsForThought
March 28th 06, 06:38 PM
Joe Canuck wrote:
> We should worry so much about the food WE consume.

LOL! I always say my cats eat better than we do.

PawsForThought
March 28th 06, 06:40 PM
Joe Negron wrote:
> I've never seen organic cat food.

I believe Paul Newman's uses organic ingredients, but can't say for
sure. Petguard uses free-range, non-hormones beef.

PawsForThought
March 28th 06, 06:42 PM
wrote:
> Testimony is often the best proof. My sister's two feral rescues were
> 2 years old when they came to her from a no-kill shelter, where they'd
> lived since they were kittens. They were being well cared for and fed
> plenty of commercial food at the shelter. After two weeks on organic
> raw food these adult cats actually started growing in size. Their
> teeth and eyes cleared, no more bad breath, silkier coats, and what
> came out of them completely changed in ...well, stinkiness. As in much
> less stinky. Of course now they're trying to keep up with them,
> they've got so much energy.

I started feeding my cats a homemade raw diet when they were about 3
months old (they're 6 years now). I have to say they have more energy
than any cats I've ever had.

Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe

Joe Canuck
March 29th 06, 05:07 AM
Joe Negron wrote:
> On 2006-03-28, Joe Canuck > wrote:
>> wrote:
>>> [...]
>>>
>>> A cat's natural diet does not include fillers, chemicals, and
>>> preservatives. With an organic, species-appropriate diet, they do
>>> thrive. My sister's cases are just one example. I've seen this
>>> without fail a minimum of 30 times. Every cat has also gone through a
>>> detox period of about 1-2 weeks where everything gets stinkier, etc.
>>> and then it's like they've peeled off a dingy film and everything about
>>> them shines.
>> We should worry so much about the food WE consume.
>
> We do, which is why my wife and I have been eating exclusively organic
> food (except for the occasional take-out or restaurant meal) for about
> the last seven and a half years. Better for us, better for the planet,
> etc.
>
> I've never seen organic cat food. Romeo has been eating Iams almost
> since we got him over nine years ago. He seems to like it.
>

I don't doubt it is better for all of us, but how do you know the foods
you purchase have been grown and tended in a completely organic matter?

These days even ordinary water isn't quite so ordinary anymore. :-(

Joe Negron
March 29th 06, 01:03 PM
On 2006-03-28, PawsForThought > wrote:
>
> Joe Negron wrote:
>>I've never seen organic cat food.
>
>I believe Paul Newman's uses organic ingredients, but can't say for
>sure.

Thanks for the mention.

Later, after posting that message, I happened to watch an "Iconoclasts"
episode on Sundance; this particular episode was on Robert Redford's
regard for Paul Newman. As a matter of course, they did a small segment
on Newman's Organics and, what do you know, they displayed a Newman's
Organic's pet food. :)

I've never noticed it where we shop, but I'll keep an eye out for it.

>Petguard uses free-range, non-hormones beef.

Thanks for this, too.

--
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Gambling: The sure way of getting nothing for something.

--Wilson Mizner
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Joe Negron from Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, NY, USA

Joe Negron
March 29th 06, 01:16 PM
On 2006-03-29, Joe Canuck > wrote:
>Joe Negron wrote:
>>On 2006-03-28, Joe Canuck > wrote:
wrote:
>>>>[...]
>>>We should worry so much about the food WE consume.
>>
>>We do, which is why my wife and I have been eating exclusively organic
>>food (except for the occasional take-out or restaurant meal) for about
>>the last seven and a half years. Better for us, better for the planet,
>>etc.
>>
>>I've never seen organic cat food. Romeo has been eating Iams almost
>>since we got him over nine years ago. He seems to like it.
>>
>I don't doubt it is better for all of us, but how do you know the foods
>you purchase have been grown and tended in a completely organic matter?

Well, that's another whole kettle of fish (bleak attempt to stay OT --
cat, fish, get it?). IMO, the situation was better when state organic
certification was the norm (Oregon, Washington, etc.) instead of the
USDA Organic certification. The USDA Organic standard is a watered down
version of the various regional certification agencies. To make matters
worse, various corporations are putting pressure on the USDA to further
erode the USDA organic standard. It doesn't help that many of the
people at the top of the USDA (and many other government agencies) are
former industry lobbyists and such.

>These days even ordinary water isn't quite so ordinary anymore. :-(

I'm unsure of what you mean this, but I'm reminded of one of the abuses
of the term "organic": cosmetic products can be called "organic" simply
by adding water to them.

--
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Good-bye. I am leaving because I am bored.

--George Saunders' dying words
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Joe Negron from Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, NY, USA

PawsForThought
March 29th 06, 02:47 PM
Joe Negron wrote:
> On 2006-03-28, PawsForThought > wrote:
> >
> > Joe Negron wrote:
> >>I've never seen organic cat food.
> >
> >I believe Paul Newman's uses organic ingredients, but can't say for
> >sure.
>
> Thanks for the mention.
>
> Later, after posting that message, I happened to watch an "Iconoclasts"
> episode on Sundance; this particular episode was on Robert Redford's
> regard for Paul Newman. As a matter of course, they did a small segment
> on Newman's Organics and, what do you know, they displayed a Newman's
> Organic's pet food. :)

I saw that listed in the tv guide, now I wish I'd watched it.

> I've never noticed it where we shop, but I'll keep an eye out for it.

Do you have a Whole Foods Market in your area? I know the one by me
carries it.

Lauren

Joe Negron
March 30th 06, 04:35 PM
On 2006-03-29, PawsForThought > wrote:
>>I've never noticed it where we shop, but I'll keep an eye out for it.
>
>Do you have a Whole Foods Market in your area? I know the one by me
>carries it.

Indeed, that's where we do the majority of our grocery shopping. In
fact, Whole Foods recently opened a second store in NYC. Now, if they'd
just open a store in our neighborhood in Brooklyn, we'd be in heaven.

I'll make a point to check out their pet food section on the next trip.

--
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Age...is a matter of feeling, not of years.

--George William Curtis
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Joe Negron from Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn, NY, USA

PawsForThought
March 31st 06, 05:08 PM
Aleks A.-Lessmann wrote:
> Shiny coats, energetic cats. Only the teeth are so-so. Both males have
> good teeth, the younger female not good the older female a disaster area
> we are trying to contain cleaning the teeth every two days (Which
> extends to the other one if we can get her to accept it once in a
> while...).
>
> My 0.2 EUR
> Aleks

Hi Aleks,
In addition to tooth brusing, another thing that works vey well for
keeping the teeth in good condition are raw chicken gizzards. If you
don't want to feed them raw, you can lightly braise them in some butter.