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John Samstron
March 29th 06, 06:55 PM
Hi:

We've got a dangerous indoor cat




She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
her late 80's.

-- Off topic -----
By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
--End Off Topic-----

What happened? The cat, in an attempt to coerce more food, rubbed
against the back of my mom's leg, whereupon my Mom fell backwards and
hit her side against the edge of the bathtub.

At the same time, she fell on the cat. The cat wasn't injured.
However, I learned a lesson that day. A relatively scaredy cat type
cat can become incredibly aggressive. I needed a broom to push her
away as she, for some strange reason, stood her ground.

My Mom's out of hospital and much better. But the cat is still trying
to coerce food by sneaking up and rubbing on my Mom's legs or walking
behind her.



The cat already has a collar with an ID tag on it. I'd like to add a
bell. But all the bells I've seen are just small rattles. They may be
enough for a bird, but not for an elderly person with some hearing
loss.

Any suggestions?


Thanks

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PawsForThought
March 29th 06, 09:36 PM
John Samstron wrote:
> -- Off topic -----
> By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
> hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
> patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
> pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
> little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
> breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
> function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
> move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
> on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
> is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
> --End Off Topic-----

I completely agree. I don't know why doctors are so hesitant to
prescribe proper pain medication. Perhaps because they're nervous
about the FDA, I don't know.
>
> What happened? The cat, in an attempt to coerce more food, rubbed
> against the back of my mom's leg, whereupon my Mom fell backwards and
> hit her side against the edge of the bathtub.

So sorry to hear about your mom.

> My Mom's out of hospital and much better. But the cat is still trying
> to coerce food by sneaking up and rubbing on my Mom's legs or walking
> behind her.

Does the cat do this when your mom is in the kitchen? If so, is there
any way to keep the cat out of the kitchen when your mom is in there?

Charlie Wilkes
March 29th 06, 10:38 PM
On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 12:55:35 -0500, John Samstron
> wrote:

>Hi:
>
>We've got a dangerous indoor cat
>
>
>
>
>She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
>ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
>either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
>expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
>her late 80's.
>
>-- Off topic -----
>By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
>hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
>patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
>pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
>little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
>breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
>function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
>move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
>on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
>is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
>--End Off Topic-----

That's no fun. You need to set Mom up with a roll of $50 bills and
send her out to a few of those walk-in clinics. It works for me &
Rush Limbaugh.
>
>What happened? The cat, in an attempt to coerce more food, rubbed
>against the back of my mom's leg, whereupon my Mom fell backwards and
>hit her side against the edge of the bathtub.
>
>At the same time, she fell on the cat. The cat wasn't injured.
>However, I learned a lesson that day. A relatively scaredy cat type
>cat can become incredibly aggressive. I needed a broom to push her
>away as she, for some strange reason, stood her ground.
>
>My Mom's out of hospital and much better. But the cat is still trying
>to coerce food by sneaking up and rubbing on my Mom's legs or walking
>behind her.
>
>The cat already has a collar with an ID tag on it. I'd like to add a
>bell. But all the bells I've seen are just small rattles. They may be
>enough for a bird, but not for an elderly person with some hearing
>loss.
>
>Any suggestions?
>
I think you need to work with Mom so she learns to use a walker around
the house and keep an eye out for the cat. Anything loud enough will
be an annoyance to the cat and might potentiate its antisocial
tendencies.

Charlie

T
March 30th 06, 01:47 AM
In article . com>,
says...
>
> John Samstron wrote:
> > -- Off topic -----
> > By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
> > hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
> > patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
> > pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
> > little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
> > breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
> > function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
> > move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
> > on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
> > is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
> > --End Off Topic-----
>
> I completely agree. I don't know why doctors are so hesitant to
> prescribe proper pain medication. Perhaps because they're nervous
> about the FDA, I don't know.

The paliative care in this country is disgusting. Believe it or not,
it's more based in Protestant ethic than fear of the FDA.

March 30th 06, 07:14 AM
It sounds like your Mother is getting very unsteady on her feet.. If a cat
rubbing on the back of her legs is enough to startle her and make her fall
backwards, she definitely is having balance problems. You also do not break
all those bones from a simple fall unless you has serious osteoporosis. So
you need to get with your Mom's doctors and make sure all these issues are
addressed. (My mother went through similar experiences the last 10 years of
her life.)

But - the immediate problem is how to keep kitty out from under your mom's
feet. First of all, your cat's not at fault - its just the situation. You
may need to confine the cat to one room, unless you are home to keep an eye
on things.
Worst case, you may need to give the cat away.

Seriously, with balance problems it takes very little to make a person fall.
A slight unevenness in the floor, a chair moved, etc can all cause a fall.
Ask your doctor if he thinks it would be safer for you Mom to use a walker
indoor too.

-- maryjane

"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 29 Mar 2006 12:55:35 -0500, John Samstron
> > wrote:
>
>>Hi:
>>
>>We've got a dangerous indoor cat
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
>>ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
>>either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
>>expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
>>her late 80's.
>>
>>-- Off topic -----
>>By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
>>hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
>>patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
>>pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
>>little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
>>breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
>>function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
>>move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
>>on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
>>is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
>>--End Off Topic-----
>
> That's no fun. You need to set Mom up with a roll of $50 bills and
> send her out to a few of those walk-in clinics. It works for me &
> Rush Limbaugh.
>>
>>What happened? The cat, in an attempt to coerce more food, rubbed
>>against the back of my mom's leg, whereupon my Mom fell backwards and
>>hit her side against the edge of the bathtub.
>>
>>At the same time, she fell on the cat. The cat wasn't injured.
>>However, I learned a lesson that day. A relatively scaredy cat type
>>cat can become incredibly aggressive. I needed a broom to push her
>>away as she, for some strange reason, stood her ground.
>>
>>My Mom's out of hospital and much better. But the cat is still trying
>>to coerce food by sneaking up and rubbing on my Mom's legs or walking
>>behind her.
>>
>>The cat already has a collar with an ID tag on it. I'd like to add a
>>bell. But all the bells I've seen are just small rattles. They may be
>>enough for a bird, but not for an elderly person with some hearing
>>loss.
>>
>>Any suggestions?
>>
> I think you need to work with Mom so she learns to use a walker around
> the house and keep an eye out for the cat. Anything loud enough will
> be an annoyance to the cat and might potentiate its antisocial
> tendencies.
>
> Charlie

IBen Getiner
March 30th 06, 10:09 AM
John Samstron wrote:
> Hi:
>
> We've got a dangerous indoor cat
>
>
>
>
> She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
> ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
> either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
> expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
> her late 80's.
>
> -- Off topic -----
> By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
> hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
> patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
> pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
> little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
> breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
> function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
> move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
> on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
> is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
> --End Off Topic-----
>
> What happened? The cat, in an attempt to coerce more food, rubbed
> against the back of my mom's leg, whereupon my Mom fell backwards and
> hit her side against the edge of the bathtub.
>
> At the same time, she fell on the cat. The cat wasn't injured.
> However, I learned a lesson that day. A relatively scaredy cat type
> cat can become incredibly aggressive. I needed a broom to push her
> away as she, for some strange reason, stood her ground.
>
> My Mom's out of hospital and much better. But the cat is still trying
> to coerce food by sneaking up and rubbing on my Mom's legs or walking
> behind her.
>
>
>
> The cat already has a collar with an ID tag on it. I'd like to add a
> bell. But all the bells I've seen are just small rattles. They may be
> enough for a bird, but not for an elderly person with some hearing
> loss.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
>
> Thanks
>
> -------------
> Get FREE newsgroup access from http://www.cheap56k.com

You need to teach your mother to simply act like the cat's not even
there when it tangles itself up between her feet. The cat will learn in
short order who 'falls' for it and who doesn't. This has worked quite
well in our household. Our little boy NEVER, ever EVER tries to get
tangled up between MY feet anymore. Because he knows that I just keep
right on walking! The wife, being the tender hearted soul that she is,
is constantly bring me horror stories about how the boy almost killed
here, tripped her up, "is trying to kill me", etc., etc.
That's the ticket, believe me. You're much bigger than little pussy,
there... It sees you like a towering behemoth! You're big... He's
little. And he knows it! Do you...?
It does take presence of mind, though. You can't just step directly on
the kat. You'd really hurt him. Just keep those old legs and feet
a-moving. It's like watching a limp noodle getting tangled up in a
blender on low speed! LOL...!! It really works, too, or my name
actually is......



IBen Getiner !


http://www.2dvalley.com/gallery/albums/RavnHearts-Gallery/Gollum.sized.jpg

MaryL
March 30th 06, 11:48 AM
"John Samstron" > wrote in message
...
> Hi:
>
> We've got a dangerous indoor cat
>
>
>
>
> She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
> ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
> either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
> expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
> her late 80's.
>
> -- Off topic -----
> By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
> hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
> patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
> pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
> little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
> breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
> function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
> move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
> on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
> is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
> --End Off Topic-----
>
>
[Still off topic]
I agree. My mother had several spinal surgeries over a period of many years
and suffered a slipped disc when she was 85. I eventually had to place her
in a nursing home when she became almost completely bed-ridden, and I could
not properly care for her myself. She was in constant, *excruciating* pain.
Her doctor would only prescribe the mildest of pain killers -- he seemed to
be afraid that she would become "addicted" or that pain medication "would
make her drowsy." I kept saying that she needed to be made comfortable, and
I thought being "drowsy" was much preferable to constant, unrelenting pain.
I made arrangements for an orthopetic specialist to see her, and X-Rays
showed that her entire spine was crooked and out of alignment. At the same
time, she was not in any condition to have surgery (which I already knew).
The real life-saver for her was when a nurse recommended a pain management
specialist. He was horrified when he saw that she was in such pain in the
waiting room that she was literally crying out, and he prescribed a patch
that basically released a small amount of medication on a continuing basis.
He was able to prescribe the patch at a fairly low dosage, and the pain
disappeared within just a couple of days. Ironically, she also did not
suffer the drowsines that her doctor had worried about. Without all that
pain, she became alert and cheerful.

MaryL

March 31st 06, 11:24 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:

>
>"John Samstron" > wrote in message
...
>> Hi:
>>
>> We've got a dangerous indoor cat
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> She's already managed to put my mom in hospital with at least 5 broken
>> ribs and a hemopneumothorax. In the time my mom was in hospital, she
>> either picked up a wicked bacteria called c.difficile or it was
>> expressed because of all the antibiotics she was taking. My mom's in
>> her late 80's.
>>
>> -- Off topic -----
>> By the way, if you've got an elderly parent and they break ribs or
>> hips or whatever, make sure to read up on pain control. Elderly
>> patients die in large numbers because they don't receive sufficient
>> pain control. Here's how it goes --- accident --- lots of pain ---
>> little pain control but much less pain if you don't move around or
>> breath properly --- result is pneumonia or other damage to lung
>> function. Alternative, give sufficient pain medications so they can
>> move around and breath properly. You may have to fight the doctors
>> on this one. We did and had a hard time even though one of hers sons
>> is a doctor. The first doctor's idea of pain control was Tylenol #3.
>> --End Off Topic-----
>>
>>
>[Still off topic]
>I agree. My mother had several spinal surgeries over a period of many years
>and suffered a slipped disc when she was 85. I eventually had to place her
>in a nursing home when she became almost completely bed-ridden, and I could
>not properly care for her myself. She was in constant, *excruciating* pain.
>Her doctor would only prescribe the mildest of pain killers -- he seemed to
>be afraid that she would become "addicted" or that pain medication "would
>make her drowsy." I kept saying that she needed to be made comfortable, and
>I thought being "drowsy" was much preferable to constant, unrelenting pain.
>I made arrangements for an orthopetic specialist to see her, and X-Rays
>showed that her entire spine was crooked and out of alignment. At the same
>time, she was not in any condition to have surgery (which I already knew).
>The real life-saver for her was when a nurse recommended a pain management
>specialist. He was horrified when he saw that she was in such pain in the
>waiting room that she was literally crying out, and he prescribed a patch
>that basically released a small amount of medication on a continuing basis.
>He was able to prescribe the patch at a fairly low dosage, and the pain
>disappeared within just a couple of days. Ironically, she also did not
>suffer the drowsines that her doctor had worried about. Without all that
>pain, she became alert and cheerful.
>
>MaryL
>

Thanks for the replies. I'll talk to my Mom them to see if she can
encourage the cat to stay away from her feet.

As to pain control, if the attending doctors aren't getting that under
control, get a pain specialist. Pain can kill and certainly can slow
down recovery.



-------------
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