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April 13th 06, 01:55 PM
I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
his teeth every few days.

This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
extractions.

I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
gingivitis now.

I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
far as I can tell he does not chew it.

This is a REALLY dumb question and won't affect my decision, but will
he look different after his teeth are out? I just want to be
prepared.

About how long does it take them to recover? It breaks my heart when
he doesn't feel well.

So, I'm thinking of trying the food and brushing for a few months. If
that doesn't help, and I doubt that it will, I plan to have them
extract his teeth.

What do you think?

Shardonay
April 13th 06, 02:24 PM
My 4 year old bombay had a mild case of gingivitis last year. (wouldn't
and still won't let me near him with a toothbrush or fingerbrush) The
vet suggested I have his teeth cleaned professionally. They put the cat
out so it feels nothing and can't squirm around. Seemed to work out
great. Teeth very clean after the procedure. Cost about $200 with the
blood scan (to make sure the anesthetic is correctly adjusted). I now
feed him Science Diet Oral Care nuggets and add some plaque fighter to
his water once a month. So far, so good :-)

Good luck!


wrote:
> I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
> told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
> looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
> a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
> his teeth every few days.
>
> This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
> tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
> but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
> brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
> extractions.
>
> I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
> old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
> tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
> gingivitis now.
>
> I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
> still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
> far as I can tell he does not chew it.
>
> This is a REALLY dumb question and won't affect my decision, but will
> he look different after his teeth are out? I just want to be
> prepared.
>
> About how long does it take them to recover? It breaks my heart when
> he doesn't feel well.
>
> So, I'm thinking of trying the food and brushing for a few months. If
> that doesn't help, and I doubt that it will, I plan to have them
> extract his teeth.
>
> What do you think?
>

Unknown One
April 13th 06, 02:38 PM
On 13 Apr 2006 05:55:08 -0700, wrote:

>I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
>told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
>looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
>a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
>his teeth every few days.

Has the vet ever cleaned his teeth?? My Sam had sligthly red gums and the vet cleaned his
teeth and the redness went away eventually.

Rene S.
April 13th 06, 08:51 PM
wrote:
> I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
> told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
> looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
> a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
> his teeth every few days.
>
> This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
> tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
> but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
> brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
> extractions.
>
> I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
> old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
> tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
> gingivitis now.
>
> I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
> still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
> far as I can tell he does not chew it.
>
> This is a REALLY dumb question and won't affect my decision, but will
> he look different after his teeth are out? I just want to be
> prepared.
>
> About how long does it take them to recover? It breaks my heart when
> he doesn't feel well.

I'm not a vet, but most likely you will have to have the vet
professionally clean his teeth. Once there is tartar buildup, regular
brushing won't remove it (the same is true for people). If you take
care of this sooner rather than later, it will minimize the need for
extractions (if any are needed). Yes, cats can do fine without teeth.
My parents' late kitty had several removed and ate the same as she
always did. No, he won't look different, unless the remove a canine
tooth, which is more noticable when they open their mouths.

I'm not a fan of prescription food, and personally don't think it would
have much of an effect. (One of my parents' dogs has a tartar problem
and eats this food, but still has to get his teeth cleaned about every
two years.) It's most important to feed a high quality diet and brush
regularly.

My Tucker has had his teeth cleaned twice and recovered quickly. You
might have to give him a round of antibiotics to prevent any
infections, but they can come home the same day.

Rene

Sherri
April 13th 06, 10:11 PM
Rene S. wrote:
> wrote:
> > I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
> > told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
> > looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
> > a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
> > his teeth every few days.
> >
> > This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
> > tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
> > but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
> > brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
> > extractions.
> >
> > I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
> > old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
> > tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
> > gingivitis now.
> >
> > I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
> > still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
> > far as I can tell he does not chew it.
> >
> > This is a REALLY dumb question and won't affect my decision, but will
> > he look different after his teeth are out? I just want to be
> > prepared.
> >
> > About how long does it take them to recover? It breaks my heart when
> > he doesn't feel well.
>
> I'm not a vet, but most likely you will have to have the vet
> professionally clean his teeth. Once there is tartar buildup, regular
> brushing won't remove it (the same is true for people). If you take
> care of this sooner rather than later, it will minimize the need for
> extractions (if any are needed). Yes, cats can do fine without teeth.
> My parents' late kitty had several removed and ate the same as she
> always did. No, he won't look different, unless the remove a canine
> tooth, which is more noticable when they open their mouths.
>
> I'm not a fan of prescription food, and personally don't think it would
> have much of an effect. (One of my parents' dogs has a tartar problem
> and eats this food, but still has to get his teeth cleaned about every
> two years.) It's most important to feed a high quality diet and brush
> regularly.
>
> My Tucker has had his teeth cleaned twice and recovered quickly. You
> might have to give him a round of antibiotics to prevent any
> infections, but they can come home the same day.
>
> Rene

Anitbiotics?? For what??? The gums arent infected. We dont give
antibiotics for teeth cleaning and ALL our cats stay the night after
any SX (teeth cleaning is still considered SX)

Phil P.
April 13th 06, 11:20 PM
"Sherri" > wrote in message
oups.com...

> Anitbiotics?? For what???
> The gums arent infected.


Gum tissues have an extensive blood supply- and all the bacteria contained
in the calculi can easily enter the blood stream and cause infections in
other organ systems. Bacteria-laden calculi also serves as a direct
reservoir for bacterial contamination of the lungs. One of the reasons why
vets wear masks while cleaning a cat's teeth is so they don't inhale
bacteria. Conscientious vets will never schedule surgeries in the same room
on the same day after dental cleanings because the entire room is
contaminated with bacteria.



We dont give
> antibiotics for teeth cleaning

That's scary!

LB
April 13th 06, 11:37 PM
writes:
> I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice.
------
If your dentist said you had tartar on your teeth, would you have them
removed?

> [...] If the gum problems didn't improve since last year
> when he had no tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning
> is going to cure the gingivitis now.
-------
If your dentist said you had gingivitis despite brushing every day,
wouldn't you get your teeth professionally cleaned?

If the cat has healthy teeth underneath the tartar, have the TARTAR
professionally removed. This should cure the gingivitis while leaving
the teeth in tact.

Toni from T.O.
April 13th 06, 11:49 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
> old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
> tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
> gingivitis now.


My cat had the same thing, but I put off the professional cleaning because
he had other issues that had to be dealt with first. Well, eventually it
got bad enough that when he did go in for the cleaning, they had to do three
extractions. He's pulled through it fine. He was on wet food for the first
time in his life for a few weeks, and when he started turning up his nose at
it, I knew he was fine. So now it's back to eating dry food only.

The BEST thing about having his teeth cleaned? No more stinky breath!
Honestly, he used to yawn, and I could smell it across the room. I thought
it was normal, but now? Sweet!

Actually, the best thing about having his teeth cleaned is no more nasty
bacteria going into his bloodstream and putting strain on his mildly CRF
kidneys.

So go for the cleaning, and listen to Phil, and go with the antibiotics. A
cat is like a car...you have to invest in preventive maintenance to prolong
your enjoyment!

Good luck.

Toni from T.O.

Phil P.
April 13th 06, 11:52 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I took my cat to the vet yesterday for his annual exam. Last year they
> told me his teeth were good but that he had gingivitis. His gums
> looked quite red. He had no other symptoms - ate his dry food without
> a problem and didn't seem to have any discomfort. I started brushing
> his teeth every few days.
>
> This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
> tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
> but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
> brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
> extractions.
>
> I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
> old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
> tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
> gingivitis now.
>
> I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
> still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
> far as I can tell he does not chew it.
>
> This is a REALLY dumb question and won't affect my decision, but will
> he look different after his teeth are out? I just want to be
> prepared.
>
> About how long does it take them to recover? It breaks my heart when
> he doesn't feel well.
>
> So, I'm thinking of trying the food and brushing for a few months. If
> that doesn't help, and I doubt that it will, I plan to have them
> extract his teeth.
>
> What do you think?


I think you should have your cat's teeth cleaned and forget about
extractions unless your cat actually has stomatitis or a bad tooth.

Gingivitis is reversible. If your vet recommended a full mouth extraction-
you need to find a new vet.

Anna via CatKB.com
April 14th 06, 12:47 AM
>This year the gingivitis is still the same and now they say he has
>tartar on his teeth. They still don't think it's an emergency issue
>but told me to try a dental food (Science Diet Prescription TD) and to
>brush daily. If that doesn't help to consider cleaning and/or
>extractions.

Why would they want to wait until it is am emergency issue? You should get
the cleaning now since there is tarter and gingivitis.

>I am leaning towards extractions and wanted some advice. He is 6 years
>old. If the gum problems didn't improve since last year when he had no
>tartar problems I don't see that a cleaning is going to cure the
>gingivitis now.

Does he have FORL's (cavities)? If not, why would you get extractions?

>I'm told a cat can do just fine without teeth. Is that true? Can I
>still feed him dry food? He loves Science Diet Nature's Best and as
>far as I can tell he does not chew it.

First of all, I don't think a vet would pull all of a cat's teeth out.
Second, your cat would be in a whole lot of pain if someone did.

>So, I'm thinking of trying the food and brushing for a few months. If
>that doesn't help, and I doubt that it will, I plan to have them
>extract his teeth.

The food isn't going to get rid of the tarter. The food is usually given to
patients AFTER they have a cleaning to try and prevent the build-up of tarter
from happening again. Brushing can help with tarter and you should
definitely start doing it after the cleaning. But it doesn't help with
FORL's so he may still develop some in his lifetime even with brushing. I've
brushed my cat's teeth her whole life and she has much less tarter than a cat
with unbrushed teeth but she recently developed two cavities. FORL's are not
caused by food sitting on teeth like human's cavities are. In fact, they're
not sure why some cat's get them.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200604/1

Anna via CatKB.com
April 14th 06, 01:00 AM
One other thing, your vet should have told you that the bacteria from
gingivitis can enter the bloodstream over time and affect the heart, kidneys
or liver.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200604/1

April 14th 06, 01:34 AM
I'm not sure I made myself clear the first time:

When I took him to the vet last year his gums were VERY red. His teeth
did not have tartar. The vet said he thought the gingivitis was going
to be a long term issue but he decided to try antibiotics. They made a
small improvement for a short time only. His gums are still very red.

The tartar on his teeth this year cannot be the cause of the gingivitis
if he didn't have tartar last year.

I'm not adverse to having his teeth cleaned. It's not the money. I
just don't want to put him under anethesia, go through the trauma of
staying at the vet and then have to have him go back in a few months
for extractions.

No, I would not have my teeth pulled if they just had tartar. If I
believed that was the cause of the problem I wouldn't even consider
extractions.

I want to do what's best for my cat. I also don't want the gingivitis
to go on too long because I know it can cause serious problems.

Phil P.
April 14th 06, 03:02 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I'm not sure I made myself clear the first time:
>
> When I took him to the vet last year his gums were VERY red. His teeth
> did not have tartar. The vet said he thought the gingivitis was going
> to be a long term issue but he decided to try antibiotics. They made a
> small improvement for a short time only. His gums are still very red.
>
> The tartar on his teeth this year cannot be the cause of the gingivitis
> if he didn't have tartar last year.
>
> I'm not adverse to having his teeth cleaned. It's not the money. I
> just don't want to put him under anethesia, go through the trauma of
> staying at the vet and then have to have him go back in a few months
> for extractions.
>
> No, I would not have my teeth pulled if they just had tartar. If I
> believed that was the cause of the problem I wouldn't even consider
> extractions.
>
> I want to do what's best for my cat. I also don't want the gingivitis
> to go on too long because I know it can cause serious problems.


Thanks for the clarification. Now I understand why your vet recommended
extractions. You're describing plasmacytic stomatitis or
lymphocytic-plasmacytic stomatitis w/ a superficial bacterial component-
that's why antibiotics produced temporary relief.

Does it look like this:

http://maxshouse.com/Illustrations/Stomatitis.jpg

http://maxshouse.com/Illustrations/Feline_gingivostomatitis/Feline_gingivostomatitis_1.jpg


Unfortunately, the medical treatments for stomatitis are either drugs with
poor chances of success or drugs with serious side effects
(long-term/high-dose steroids or immunosuppressive drugs). Extracting all
the teeth just the teeth behind the canines may sound extreme, but its
brought a cure to many cats where nothing else worked.

If I were you, I'd consult a veterinary dentist before I made any decisions.

Best of luck,

Phil

Phil P.
April 14th 06, 03:24 AM
"Anna via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]

FORL's are not
> caused by food sitting on teeth like human's cavities are. In fact,
they're
> not sure why some cat's get them.

FORLs develop when the normal cells that normally destroy the roots of the
baby teeth (deciduous teeth) become active again in adult cats and start to
destroy the permanent teeth. There are 4-5 stages of FORL- but even if
they're filled in the early stages, the cells still eat the teeth away under
the filling.

I don't think this cat has FORLs since the problem is in the gums and oral
mucosa and not in the teeth.

Cheryl
April 14th 06, 03:53 AM
On Thu 13 Apr 2006 08:34:50p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
roups.com):

> I'm not sure I made myself clear the first time:
>
> When I took him to the vet last year his gums were VERY red.
> His teeth did not have tartar. The vet said he thought the
> gingivitis was going to be a long term issue but he decided to
> try antibiotics. They made a small improvement for a short time
> only. His gums are still very red.
>
> The tartar on his teeth this year cannot be the cause of the
> gingivitis if he didn't have tartar last year.
>
> I'm not adverse to having his teeth cleaned. It's not the
> money. I just don't want to put him under anethesia, go through
> the trauma of staying at the vet and then have to have him go
> back in a few months for extractions.
>
> No, I would not have my teeth pulled if they just had tartar.
> If I believed that was the cause of the problem I wouldn't even
> consider extractions.
>
> I want to do what's best for my cat. I also don't want the
> gingivitis to go on too long because I know it can cause serious
> problems.
>
>

I have a cat that gets gingivitis and plaque. He's only about 4
years old, but he's had his teeth cleaned twice now. I try to brush
them, but end up doing it only about once a week. This last time he
had them cleaned at the vet's office was because when I brushed
them, his gums bled. He's never had an extraction, he even has a
broken canine that was merely sealed during the dental. This cat
also has severe skin allergy problems, and since he's the first cat
I've ever had with teeth and gum problems, I wonder if they're
related? Neither of his vets (dermatologist and regular vet) have
ever explored connecting the two issues, but I still wonder
sometimes. He's always had antibiotics (clavimox) after dental
cleaning. And, I *always* have to stop it short of the full round
when it starts making him sick. But by that point, the gums are
looking healthy. Next time I have to remember to tell them to give
him something else. I've just resigned myself to the fact that
he'll probably have dental cleanings every other year for life.
This last time he was much more out of it when I brought him home
than the last time. I think they must have done it later in the
day. He was hard to handle while coming out of the anesthesia, and
had to spend some time in the carrier when we got home. That's the
part I hate about dentals.


--
Cheryl

Unknown One
April 14th 06, 01:00 PM
On 13 Apr 2006 17:34:50 -0700, wrote:

>I'm not sure I made myself clear the first time:
>
>When I took him to the vet last year his gums were VERY red. His teeth
>did not have tartar. The vet said he thought the gingivitis was going
>to be a long term issue but he decided to try antibiotics. They made a
>small improvement for a short time only. His gums are still very red.
>
>The tartar on his teeth this year cannot be the cause of the gingivitis
>if he didn't have tartar last year.
>
>I'm not adverse to having his teeth cleaned. It's not the money. I
>just don't want to put him under anethesia, go through the trauma of
>staying at the vet and then have to have him go back in a few months
>for extractions.
>
>No, I would not have my teeth pulled if they just had tartar. If I
>believed that was the cause of the problem I wouldn't even consider
>extractions.
>
>I want to do what's best for my cat. I also don't want the gingivitis
>to go on too long because I know it can cause serious problems.

If you want to do what is best for the cat have his teeth cleaned. How often do you have
your teeth cleaned??

LB
April 14th 06, 10:51 PM
writes:
> [...] The tartar on his teeth this year cannot be the cause
> of the gingivitis if he didn't have tartar last year.
----------------
The fact that he's gained tartar SINCE last year means that his teeth
have not been cleaned well enough to heal the gingivitis.

Please clean the teeth!!

April 15th 06, 01:12 AM
I received a price quote from the vet today. $445 for a cleaning and
$650 with extractions. If I just do the cleaning and it doesn't work
I won't be able to afford the extractions. I had no idea it would be
this expensive.

The only thing I can do is the extractions and hope he'll be OK.

LB
April 15th 06, 01:49 AM
You can get quotes from other vets. I've paid $126 in the NY metro
area.

The idea is to clean and while the cat is under, extract ONLY those
teeth that are causing disease in the process. Your vet is not exactly
teaching you very much about your options for such a hefty price.
Please make some phone calls.

Sherri
April 15th 06, 01:50 AM
Phil P. wrote:
> "Sherri" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>
> > Anitbiotics?? For what???
> > The gums arent infected.
>
>
> Gum tissues have an extensive blood supply- and all the bacteria contained
> in the calculi can easily enter the blood stream and cause infections in
> other organ systems. Bacteria-laden calculi also serves as a direct
> reservoir for bacterial contamination of the lungs. One of the reasons why
> vets wear masks while cleaning a cat's teeth is so they don't inhale
> bacteria. Conscientious vets will never schedule surgeries in the same room
> on the same day after dental cleanings because the entire room is
> contaminated with bacteria.
>
>
>
> We dont give
> > antibiotics for teeth cleaning
>
> That's scary!

We have a SX room just for teeth cleaning. I'll ask why we dont send
home meds, but personally when I do take my cat in next week for his
teeth cleaning and dont want take home meds. If is anint
broke.......... Just like I dont treat my childrems fevers until it
gets over 100, dont think all ear infections (slight infections) need
antibiotics. "I" think people jump to meds to quickly.

Now, watch me freak out next week and demand meds LOL!! I can handle so
much stuff at work as long as its not my fur baby. My dog had SX last
tuesday (had a huge fatty tumor removed) and I was a nervous hen! I
even had to leave the SX room because I couldnt take (my stomach that
is) watching my own dog on the table!