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Ellie Bentley
April 25th 06, 01:22 PM
Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)

As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
and behaving like "one of the lads".

The thing is, my black cat and my ginger cat fit both of these
traditional perceptions PERFECTLY!

What is more, my black cat and my ginger cat are TWIN BROTHERS who have
been treated with exactly the same love and attention since birth. They
are both about 18 months old.

So what do people think?

Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
their general behaviour?

I asked a professional biologist about this and he says there are many
instances elsewhere in the animal kingdom where one genetic
characteristic (even such as colour) is synonymous with another feature
or behaviour.

All anecdotes (or even pointers to academic studies!) most gratefully
accepted.

Ellie.

Ellie Bentley
April 25th 06, 01:24 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to their general behaviour?

Sorry. That line should read: "Do the colours of cats' coats relate to
their general behaviour?"

Ellie.

Toni
April 25th 06, 05:52 PM
"Ellie Bentley" > wrote in message
...
>
> Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
> their general behaviour?
>


I have been grooming cats professionally for 34 years and have noticed a
definite correlation. But my experience has been in direct opposition to
your thoughts.

What follows is highly subjective and I am in no way saying that "this is
true*, but is only my opinion. Also breed and body type also indicate
different characteristics and may often trump color.

I find black cats to be the most ornery and difficult to manage, and in my
circle of groomers thay have a reputation of being more likely to be crazy.
I have a black cat myself and he is a nutball.

The ginger or marmalade cats, on the other hand, are the most personable
easy going cats you could ever ask for. Outgoing yet easy to handle. I have
two marmalade litter brothers and they are both absolute perfection.

Whites I find to be more docile yet not as outgoing as the gingers.

Tuxedo kitties I would rank between the ginger and the whites- not quite as
gregarious as the gingers, but not as reserved as the whites.

The pointed cats, brown tabbies, and other solid colors (blues, browns,
lilacs) are highly variable.

JMO.


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

Elizabeth Blake
April 26th 06, 05:49 AM
"Ellie Bentley" > wrote in message
...
> Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
> there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
> intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
> bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)

My black cat, Otto, is extremely sweet & loving but he's not the smartest
cat on the block.

> As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
> for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
> and behaving like "one of the lads".

I've only had my ginger guy for a few weeks now but he is like Otto.
Extremely sweet & loving, and seems a little smarter than Otto. That may
change as I get to know him better. He is not independent so far, and likes
to be wherever I am. He desperately wants Otto to notice him.

--
Liz

-L.
April 26th 06, 06:10 AM
Toni wrote:
> I have been grooming cats professionally for 34 years and have noticed a
> definite correlation. But my experience has been in direct opposition to
> your thoughts.

I used to groom as well and would agree with your thougts.

>
> What follows is highly subjective and I am in no way saying that "this is
> true*, but is only my opinion. Also breed and body type also indicate
> different characteristics and may often trump color.
>
> I find black cats to be the most ornery and difficult to manage, and in my
> circle of groomers thay have a reputation of being more likely to be crazy.
> I have a black cat myself and he is a nutball.

That is because black cats - particularly males - are big babies in a
cat suit. They think they are the center of the universe and cannot
imagine why you do not think so, too.

>
> The ginger or marmalade cats, on the other hand, are the most personable
> easy going cats you could ever ask for. Outgoing yet easy to handle. I have
> two marmalade litter brothers and they are both absolute perfection.

We call it Big Orange syndrome.

>
> Whites I find to be more docile yet not as outgoing as the gingers.

Whites are usually pretty cool cats.

>
> Tuxedo kitties I would rank between the ginger and the whites- not quite as
> gregarious as the gingers, but not as reserved as the whites.

I would rate black and whit tux males to be equal to ginger/orange in
personality, with a nit more sense of adventure.

>
> The pointed cats, brown tabbies, and other solid colors (blues, browns,
> lilacs) are highly variable.

Agreed. However torties and calicos are nuts - usually quirky and want
affection when *they* want to allow it - usually a bit stand-offish but
can also be a one-person cat. A friend calls torties the Snickers cat
- half sweet, half nuts.

-L.

Ellie Bentley
April 26th 06, 09:11 AM
-L. wrote:
> Toni wrote:
> > I have been grooming cats professionally for 34 years and have noticed a
> > definite correlation. But my experience has been in direct opposition to
> > your thoughts.
> I used to groom as well and would agree with your thougts.

Toni and -L. This is very very interesting. THANKS for your replies!
The fact that you have more than 34 years experience of many different
kinds of cats between you gives a lot of weight to the theory that there
is a correlation between coat-colour and personality.

And Toni I can see how your views of black cats and ginger cats may
possibly fit easily with my view of my two cats.

My black cat is extraordinarily loving and affectionate to us, following
us from room to room, settling literally under our chins the moment we
recline on the couch, demanding to snuggle up under the duvet as soon as
the light goes out, and so on. However, every time I take him to the
vet (who happens to be a very sweet and gentle girl), it's as if he
says, "Uh-uh! No way! I don't know you on earth you are. For all I
know you may be a serial killer", and he's TOUGH to handle, bearing his
teeth, and even hissing. He wants to get straight back in his
cat-carrier.

On the other hand, our ginger cat is almost completely passive when we
take him to the vet. The vet doesn't need any assistance with him from
me. She can get him out of the carrier by herself. She plonks in the
middle of the table and he just draws himself in, looks meek, and
doesn't budge. He just waits for it all to be over and to be put back
in the carrier. He wasn't always like this. When he was a kitten, HE
was the one who was ALL affection, both at home and at the vets. The
vet still recalls how, as a kitten, he walked straight out of the
carrier, walked up her chest with his front paws, purred, and sniffed
her nose! But all that has changed. Now, at the vet he's absolutely
easy-going and well-behaved, and at home, apart from when he's hungry,
he doesn't show much affection, but seems to be just biding his time
until that time each day when he knows he can go out to hunt!

Our black cat enjoys hunting too, but I think he loves us as much, if
not more than hunting. Ginger-Tom has clearly decided the fun of
hunting is the only thing worth getting excited about!

Ellie.

Toni
April 26th 06, 06:10 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Agreed. However torties and calicos are nuts - usually quirky and want
> affection when *they* want to allow it - usually a bit stand-offish but
> can also be a one-person cat. A friend calls torties the Snickers cat
> - half sweet, half nuts.



Oops- I did leave out the calico/torties.
The very worst, grooming wise.


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

IBen Getiner
April 27th 06, 11:26 AM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
> there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
> intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
> bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)
>
> As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
> for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
> and behaving like "one of the lads".
>
> The thing is, my black cat and my ginger cat fit both of these
> traditional perceptions PERFECTLY!
>
> What is more, my black cat and my ginger cat are TWIN BROTHERS who have
> been treated with exactly the same love and attention since birth. They
> are both about 18 months old.
>
> So what do people think?
>
> Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
> their general behaviour?
>
> I asked a professional biologist about this and he says there are many
> instances elsewhere in the animal kingdom where one genetic
> characteristic (even such as colour) is synonymous with another feature
> or behaviour.
>
> All anecdotes (or even pointers to academic studies!) most gratefully
> accepted.
>
> Ellie.

I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
you were born. Same shellac..
You are a lunatic, Ellie.


IBen

Ellie Bentley
April 27th 06, 12:01 PM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
> is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
> you were born. Same shellac..
> You are a lunatic, Ellie.

No, IBen Getiner, I am not a lunatic. I also have no time for
astrology.

I do not close my mind off from any rational line of enquiry either.

Clearly, you failed to read my line regarding the correlations that DO
exist, and are documented as existing, between different genetic
features within one organism.

Go apply your mind to some book of challenging text!

Ellie.

lastcatstanding
April 27th 06, 02:18 PM
On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 12:01:35 +0100, Ellie Bentley
> wrote:

>IBen Getiner wrote:
>> I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
>> is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
>> you were born. Same shellac..
>> You are a lunatic, Ellie.
>
>No, IBen Getiner, I am not a lunatic. I also have no time for
>astrology.
>
>I do not close my mind off from any rational line of enquiry either.
>
>Clearly, you failed to read my line regarding the correlations that DO
>exist, and are documented as existing, between different genetic
>features within one organism.
>
>Go apply your mind to some book of challenging text!
>
>Ellie.


Jon Young aka "dip****"

Is nothing but a wannabe troll. He's been spanked on usenet endless
times. Be careful or he;ll edit your post.

-L.
April 27th 06, 02:46 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> -L. wrote:
> > Toni wrote:
> > > I have been grooming cats professionally for 34 years and have noticed a
> > > definite correlation. But my experience has been in direct opposition to
> > > your thoughts.
> > I used to groom as well and would agree with your thougts.
>
> Toni and -L. This is very very interesting. THANKS for your replies!
> The fact that you have more than 34 years experience of many different
> kinds of cats between you gives a lot of weight to the theory that there
> is a correlation between coat-colour and personality.
>
> And Toni I can see how your views of black cats and ginger cats may
> possibly fit easily with my view of my two cats.
>
> My black cat is extraordinarily loving and affectionate to us, following
> us from room to room, settling literally under our chins the moment we
> recline on the couch, demanding to snuggle up under the duvet as soon as
> the light goes out, and so on. However, every time I take him to the
> vet (who happens to be a very sweet and gentle girl), it's as if he
> says, "Uh-uh! No way! I don't know you on earth you are. For all I
> know you may be a serial killer", and he's TOUGH to handle, bearing his
> teeth, and even hissing. He wants to get straight back in his
> cat-carrier.

EXACTLY how my black cat is and how my last one was. Peewee was the
worst cat my first vet ever handled. Doesn't help that he weighs 22
lbs...


>
> On the other hand, our ginger cat is almost completely passive when we
> take him to the vet.

Ginger cats are the Hippy cats - just like to hang out and be your
pal.

-L.

-L.
April 27th 06, 02:51 PM
Toni wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> >
> > Agreed. However torties and calicos are nuts - usually quirky and want
> > affection when *they* want to allow it - usually a bit stand-offish but
> > can also be a one-person cat. A friend calls torties the Snickers cat
> > - half sweet, half nuts.
>
>
>
> Oops- I did leave out the calico/torties.
> The very worst, grooming wise.

Nah, Persians. Followed a close second by Himmies. ;) Persians either
come in two types - dumb and docile or dumb and meaner than ****. Of
course the "meaner than ****" Persians are the ones whose owners never
groom them and they arrive in one big mass of matt, which then you have
to shave off in a huge single hairball. Add to it their bad teeth, and
then if they nail you, you *always* get infected. Ugh. I also has a
hard time with Crabby Abbies.

Needless to say, I only got nailed badly *once* and it was an old
Persian mix. My hand blew up in a matter of two hours.

-L.

Ellie Bentley
April 27th 06, 08:43 PM
-L. wrote:
> Ginger cats are the Hippy cats - just like to hang out and be your
> pal.

-L, I can't think of a better way of describing our Ginger Tom. There
are a lot of hippy types living round these hills where we are and come
to think of it, yes, there's a real similarity with our ginger lad! I
chat to the odd hippy at the supermarket and, maybe times have changed,
but they're now all SO gentle. The men may be in their 40's with long
plaited dreadlocks and camo gear etc., but they have the voices and
natures of little boys. Just like my pussycat!

Ellie.

T
April 28th 06, 01:21 AM
In article . com>,
says...
>
> Ellie Bentley wrote:
> > Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
> > there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
> > intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
> > bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)
> >
> > As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
> > for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
> > and behaving like "one of the lads".
> >
> > The thing is, my black cat and my ginger cat fit both of these
> > traditional perceptions PERFECTLY!
> >
> > What is more, my black cat and my ginger cat are TWIN BROTHERS who have
> > been treated with exactly the same love and attention since birth. They
> > are both about 18 months old.
> >
> > So what do people think?
> >
> > Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
> > their general behaviour?
> >
> > I asked a professional biologist about this and he says there are many
> > instances elsewhere in the animal kingdom where one genetic
> > characteristic (even such as colour) is synonymous with another feature
> > or behaviour.
> >
> > All anecdotes (or even pointers to academic studies!) most gratefully
> > accepted.
> >
> > Ellie.
>
> I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
> is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
> you were born. Same shellac..
> You are a lunatic, Ellie.

I've found Orange tabby cats to be the friendliest around.

IBen Getiner
April 28th 06, 11:29 AM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
> > is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
> > you were born. Same shellac..
> > You are a lunatic, Ellie.
>
> No, IBen Getiner, I am not a lunatic. I also have no time for
> astrology.
>

Oh yeah...? Is that so...? What's you sign...?


> I do not close my mind off from any rational line of enquiry either.

I'll bet you see writing in the grass of your front yard, too. Does
your cat talk to you, Ellie? What does he say? Maybe he'z an undercover
operative of the CIA...


> Clearly, you failed to read my line regarding the correlations that DO
> exist, and are documented as existing, between different genetic
> features within one organism.

You are a ****ing NUT. That much is quite evident. Only a kook would
draw a line between two perfectly unrelated topics like you've done.
What else do you 'see', Ellie...?


> Go apply your mind to some book of challenging text!

What kind? Like the ones you read in the supermarket check-out lines?


>
> Ellie.


IBen

Lesley
April 28th 06, 11:54 AM
>
> Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
> their general behaviour?
>
Well I've had two tabby sisters and now 2 black sisters and they've all
been different characters

Isis and Fugazi the tabbies: Isis was a serious lap fungus and hug
monster, she wasn't happy unless she was being fussed over. She was
also incredibly vocal. Fugazi was much quieter and a little shy, her
favourite place in the World was on top of the wardrobe where she could
watch all around her and never be disturbed. She was not a lapcat and
she didn't say much (but that could have been with her sister she never
got a look in at laps and couldn't get a word in edgways!)

Redunzel and Sarrasine: My little black beauties. Redunzel likes to go
off on her own, she'll quite happily sit on top of the wardrobe for
hours apparently staring at nothing.She's affectionate but on her own
terms, she wants skritchies she'll approach you for them but at other
times, she doesn't want them. She's also one of the easiest cats to
please, food, wardbrobe, occasional skritchies and da nip and she's
happy. Sarrasine is an emotional extremist, she doesn't do half
measures, when she eats it's like this is the best food ever, when she
wants affection she is a little angel and all over you and when she's
feeling naughty she's a horror. She also likes to play a lot, if
no-one's playing with her then she'll find a toy and amuse herself. And
she's the smartest cat I've ever been owned by

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Ellie Bentley
April 28th 06, 08:09 PM
Lesley wrote:
Lesley,

What wonderful, distinctive, and sophisticated names your four cats
have!

Your two blacks cats, Redunzel and Sarrasin, echo the characteristics of
my black cat. Lovable, affectionate, clever, shrewd, seeming to live
with extreme emotion. Quite the opposite of my hippy, Ginger Tom, who
is perfectly lovable and very sweet, but just SO laid back!

Ellie.

joanieb
April 30th 06, 03:07 AM
-L. wrote:
> Toni wrote:
> > I have been grooming cats professionally for 34 years and have noticed a
> > definite correlation. But my experience has been in direct opposition to
> > your thoughts.
>
> I used to groom as well and would agree with your thougts.
>
> >
> > What follows is highly subjective and I am in no way saying that "this is
> > true*, but is only my opinion. Also breed and body type also indicate
> > different characteristics and may often trump color.
> >
> > I find black cats to be the most ornery and difficult to manage, and in my
> > circle of groomers thay have a reputation of being more likely to be crazy.
> > I have a black cat myself and he is a nutball.
>
> That is because black cats - particularly males - are big babies in a
> cat suit. They think they are the center of the universe and cannot
> imagine why you do not think so, too.
>
> >
> > The ginger or marmalade cats, on the other hand, are the most personable
> > easy going cats you could ever ask for. Outgoing yet easy to handle. I have
> > two marmalade litter brothers and they are both absolute perfection.
>
> We call it Big Orange syndrome.
>
> >
> > Whites I find to be more docile yet not as outgoing as the gingers.
>
> Whites are usually pretty cool cats.
>
> >
> > Tuxedo kitties I would rank between the ginger and the whites- not quite as
> > gregarious as the gingers, but not as reserved as the whites.
>
> I would rate black and whit tux males to be equal to ginger/orange in
> personality, with a nit more sense of adventure.
>
> >
> > The pointed cats, brown tabbies, and other solid colors (blues, browns,
> > lilacs) are highly variable.
>
> Agreed. However torties and calicos are nuts - usually quirky and want
> affection when *they* want to allow it - usually a bit stand-offish but
> can also be a one-person cat. A friend calls torties the Snickers cat
> - half sweet, half nuts.
>
> -L
..Hi, my black and white tux male is handsome and knows it. He is
definately not interested in being a lap kitty, yet wants to be where
the family is. He bestows his catnip mouse as a gift, sometimes in my
shoe, on the bed or by the door or in numerous places.

I have a tiny black female cat with quite a sense of adventure, very
smart and loving. Both cats are "rescue" kitties. The animal shelter
told me they have the most difficulty finding homes for back cats. My
kitty had been there two months.

Toni
April 30th 06, 03:47 AM
"joanieb" > wrote in message >
> I have a tiny black female cat with quite a sense of adventure, very
> smart and loving. Both cats are "rescue" kitties. The animal shelter
> told me they have the most difficulty finding homes for back cats. My
> kitty had been there two months.
>


My shelter also expressed many thank you's when I adopted our black one.
Evidently there are many people who shun them- their loss, really, but still
makes me sad.



--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

furfin
April 30th 06, 05:10 AM
The shelter I volunteer at also finds it takes black cats longer to
find homes. When I was a kid I had a wonderful orange tabby and when I
first started adopting cats recently as a adult I thought I wanted
another one. But I ended up taking home a "leftover" black
kitten..still stuck in a cage at 7 months old. He had been a bit
undersocialized and although he is bonded to me he just doesn't like my
boyfriend, though my boy has always been nice to him and has been loved
by cats in the past. This black cat is strange and a bit skittish, but
he gives me nose to nose greetings and I adore him.

A year later I adopted a Maine-coon-lookalike brown tabby 6 month old
kitten. He turned into a mellow but somewhat distant kitty who likes to
watch what's happening: but he will purr while being stoked or brushed
while held upside down like a baby, a position which in my experience
most cats hate.

Both these cats are rather independant and not lap cats, so recently I
went back looking for a lap kitty. I just adopted two long-haired black
brothers, one of whom is a real lap kitty it seems at 13 months (I just
pray he stays that way!) and the other is sweet next-to-you kitty. Both
are more purry and cuddly than my first black kitty who rarely purrs
except just before dinner or in an occaisonal rolling around mood, and
both are more vocal. So there you have it, three black cats all with
different personalities.

I have a theory about the orange tabby thing. More people like orange
tabbies...they fly out of the shelter. I think that they get handled
more as kittens. In a litter or kittens with an orange tabby or two and
assorted other colors most people are going to pick up the orange
tabby, and there you go, a more social cat, nothing genetic about it.

Gail
April 30th 06, 06:58 PM
Wonderful of you to adopt all of these kitties. They all have their own
personalities and all love you.....
Gail
"furfin" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> The shelter I volunteer at also finds it takes black cats longer to
> find homes. When I was a kid I had a wonderful orange tabby and when I
> first started adopting cats recently as a adult I thought I wanted
> another one. But I ended up taking home a "leftover" black
> kitten..still stuck in a cage at 7 months old. He had been a bit
> undersocialized and although he is bonded to me he just doesn't like my
> boyfriend, though my boy has always been nice to him and has been loved
> by cats in the past. This black cat is strange and a bit skittish, but
> he gives me nose to nose greetings and I adore him.
>
> A year later I adopted a Maine-coon-lookalike brown tabby 6 month old
> kitten. He turned into a mellow but somewhat distant kitty who likes to
> watch what's happening: but he will purr while being stoked or brushed
> while held upside down like a baby, a position which in my experience
> most cats hate.
>
> Both these cats are rather independant and not lap cats, so recently I
> went back looking for a lap kitty. I just adopted two long-haired black
> brothers, one of whom is a real lap kitty it seems at 13 months (I just
> pray he stays that way!) and the other is sweet next-to-you kitty. Both
> are more purry and cuddly than my first black kitty who rarely purrs
> except just before dinner or in an occaisonal rolling around mood, and
> both are more vocal. So there you have it, three black cats all with
> different personalities.
>
> I have a theory about the orange tabby thing. More people like orange
> tabbies...they fly out of the shelter. I think that they get handled
> more as kittens. In a litter or kittens with an orange tabby or two and
> assorted other colors most people are going to pick up the orange
> tabby, and there you go, a more social cat, nothing genetic about it.
>

furfin
April 30th 06, 07:20 PM
Our local spca also finds it takes black cats longer to
find homes. When I was a kid I had a wonderful orange tabby and when I
first started adopting cats recently as a adult I thought I wanted
another one. But I ended up taking home a "leftover" black
kitten..still stuck in a cage at 7 months old. He had been a bit
undersocialized and although he is bonded to me he just doesn't like my
boyfriend, though my boy has always been nice to him and has been loved
by cats in the past. This black cat is strange and a bit skittish, but
he gives me nose to nose greetings and I adore him.

A year later I adopted a Maine-coon-lookalike brown tabby 6 month old
kitten. He turned into a mellow but somewhat distant kitty who likes to
watch what's happening: but he will purr while being stoked or brushed
while held upside down like a baby, a position which in my experience
most cats hate.

Both these cats are rather independant and not lap cats, so recently I
went back looking for a lap kitty. I just adopted two long-haired black
brothers, one of whom is a real lap kitty it seems at 13 months (I just
pray he stays that way!) and the other is sweet next-to-you kitty. Both
are more purry and cuddly than my first black kitty who rarely purrs
except just before dinner or in an occaisonal rolling around mood, and
both are more vocal. So there you have it, three black cats all with
different personalities.

I have a theory about the orange tabby thing. More people like orange
tabbies...they fly out of the shelter. I think that they get handled
more as kittens. In a litter or kittens with an orange tabby or two and
assorted other colors most people are going to pick up the orange
tabby, and there you go, a more social cat, nothing genetic about it.

cybercat
April 30th 06, 08:07 PM
"furfin" > wrote

> A year later I adopted a Maine-coon-lookalike brown tabby 6 month old
> kitten. He turned into a mellow but somewhat distant kitty who likes to
> watch what's happening: but he will purr while being stoked or brushed
> while held upside down like a baby, a position which in my experience
> most cats hate.
>

My little Gracie, adores affection and can't seem to get enough,
there is an almost frantic quality to it. If she rubs against your legs
once she does it 20 times, like a windup toy, and any time I take her
in my arms she fits her little chin into the crook of my elbow and
closes her eyes and flattens out and becomes boneless, waiting
blissfully to be stroked.

However--when I flip her and try to hold her like a baby, this polite
little cat wriggles a little, then when I will not let go, gazes tolerantly
at me but PUSHES on my face with her paws---careful not to put
her claws out, but hard! It is really funny.



Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

April 30th 06, 08:11 PM
I'm not so sure about the color theory. As you say, how cats are socialized
contributes greatly to their personality. And the little buggers are just
all different - like people - even as kittens you can see personality
differences.

The example I'm thinking of - I have 2 friends who share a house. One black
cat has been aggressive and skittish since she was brought home as a kitten.
Her owner didn't expose her to other cats - but on my advice did handle,
pet, brush and play a lot with her. She's a nice one person cat - but a
terror with other cats.

Now the 2nd cat was rescued at 7-8 months. Also black. Very laid back.
Little bothers her. She was abandoned outside and my 2nd friend started
feeding her before bringing indoors. She has been kept in one bedroom until
she could be tested for feline leukemia.

Now the 2 cats are being introduced to each other. 2nd cat is used to lots
of other cats - having to cope with so many neighborhood cats outdoors. 1st
cat is still pretty upset - but they're starting to play now.

-- maryjane

"furfin" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Our local spca also finds it takes black cats longer to
> find homes. When I was a kid I had a wonderful orange tabby and when I
> first started adopting cats recently as a adult I thought I wanted
> another one. But I ended up taking home a "leftover" black
> kitten..still stuck in a cage at 7 months old. He had been a bit
> undersocialized and although he is bonded to me he just doesn't like my
> boyfriend, though my boy has always been nice to him and has been loved
> by cats in the past. This black cat is strange and a bit skittish, but
> he gives me nose to nose greetings and I adore him.
>
> A year later I adopted a Maine-coon-lookalike brown tabby 6 month old
> kitten. He turned into a mellow but somewhat distant kitty who likes to
> watch what's happening: but he will purr while being stoked or brushed
> while held upside down like a baby, a position which in my experience
> most cats hate.
>
> Both these cats are rather independant and not lap cats, so recently I
> went back looking for a lap kitty. I just adopted two long-haired black
> brothers, one of whom is a real lap kitty it seems at 13 months (I just
> pray he stays that way!) and the other is sweet next-to-you kitty. Both
> are more purry and cuddly than my first black kitty who rarely purrs
> except just before dinner or in an occaisonal rolling around mood, and
> both are more vocal. So there you have it, three black cats all with
> different personalities.
>
> I have a theory about the orange tabby thing. More people like orange
> tabbies...they fly out of the shelter. I think that they get handled
> more as kittens. In a litter or kittens with an orange tabby or two and
> assorted other colors most people are going to pick up the orange
> tabby, and there you go, a more social cat, nothing genetic about it.
>

Ellie Bentley
May 1st 06, 09:37 AM
Furfin, I'm with you on the possibility that ginger cats "fly out of the
shelter". When we adopted our two twins even we didn't want to take the
black one. Lack of markings wasn't as attractive as "with markings", as
on the ginger one. Also, the black one was showing very bad behaviour,
though now I think that this may have been because since the day he was
born everyone had been cooing over his three beautifully patterned
siblings, while he is a uniform jet-black. When we got them home and
neighbours and friends met them, we noticed how everybody went for the
ginger one, and felt some distate for the black one.

We now have a crusade on! To let visitors know that in fact it is the
black one which is the super-intelligent one, the most loving one, the
cleverest one, etc. It's extraordinary how difficult it is though to
breakthrough visitors' prejudice. They smile and listen but we can tell
that in their hearts how stories don't change their attitude. Some
visitors are changing though to the black one. It's taking time.

Good luck with your new "lap cats". I have a possibly helpful hint. I
always wear jeans at home and I keep my right pocket half-full of dry
cat biscuits. We only serve our cats wet food at meal-times and so
these biscuits are a real treat for them at other times. Whenever the
cats come and sit on my lap I reach for a couple of biscuits. If I
settle down to watch TV and they choose instead to nestle on the other
side of the room (instead of on our laps or chests, where they
belong!!!!!) then I call them (maybe have to wave a biscuit in the air)
and over they come for their treat. They've learned it pays to be
"lap-cats"!

Good luck.

Ellie.

Ellie Bentley
May 1st 06, 09:40 AM
cybercat wrote:
> My little Gracie, adores affection and can't seem to get enough,
> there is an almost frantic quality to it. If she rubs against your legs
> once she does it 20 times, like a windup toy, and any time I take her
> in my arms she fits her little chin into the crook of my elbow and
> closes her eyes and flattens out and becomes boneless, waiting
> blissfully to be stroked.

What a beautiful paragraph! These little creatures can be
extraordinary, can't they.

Ellie.

Ellie Bentley
May 1st 06, 09:44 AM
joanieb wrote:
> The animal shelter
> told me they have the most difficulty finding homes for back cats. My
> kitty had been there two months.

Thanks. More evidence of the "demonization" of "The Black Cat".

Maybe these little creatures feel the rejection and so work harder to
get the affirmation of humans - in much the same way as children in
large families who feel alienated or somewhat unwanted work hard to earn
attention.

Ellie.

furfin
May 2nd 06, 03:50 AM
Ellie, I loved your post. I'm glad you gave a black kitty a chance! I
really find black cats quite beautiful. The black coat makes their eyes
really shine out, and they are like elegant kitty sillouettes on the
hardwood floor. They don't show well in the dark cages most shelters
have. They look great against strong colors. The hair they shed tends
blend in with the dark colored clothes I like. Black is a recessive
gene so actually if I understand this wouldn't that mean they are more
rare than tabbies? It's just that they get left behind in the shelters.
I sort of like the witches' farmiliar reference too--a lot of those
witches were just uppity women and herbal healers or gals who just
stood out too much in the bad old days. It's also kind of wierd that
people don't appreciate black cats in a country where black people get
a bad deal too--it's like kitty racisim. I'm glad you are trying to get
people to see how wonderful the black kitties are!

IBen Getiner
May 2nd 06, 10:00 AM
furfin wrote:
> Ellie, I loved your post. I'm glad you gave a black kitty a chance! I
> really find black cats quite beautiful. The black coat makes their eyes
> really shine out, and they are like elegant kitty sillouettes on the
> hardwood floor. They don't show well in the dark cages most shelters
> have. They look great against strong colors. The hair they shed tends
> blend in with the dark colored clothes I like. Black is a recessive
> gene so actually if I understand this wouldn't that mean they are more
> rare than tabbies? It's just that they get left behind in the shelters.
> I sort of like the witches' farmiliar reference too--a lot of those
> witches were just uppity women and herbal healers or gals who just
> stood out too much in the bad old days. It's also kind of wierd that
> people don't appreciate black cats in a country where black people get
> a bad deal too--it's like kitty racisim. I'm glad you are trying to get
> people to see how wonderful the black kitties are!

Ellie.. Do you see what you've done...? Do you see the kind of people
that your little tale has enlisted? NUT CASES. Just like YOU. Now we
got us a ****ing witch. Can you deal with that...? I can't..
Kats are whatever colour that they are. It DOESN'T MEAN ANY GREAT
THING! It's all in genetics.
I just don't understand... why must you people always read something
deeper into everything than there really is? Because you're bored
LOZERS with no frigging life on your hands. That's the frigging problem
with your type. Get a job. Find a church. One with NORMAL people in it.
Put down your astrology books and your witch's spells and GET A LIFE.


IBen

Ellie Bentley
May 2nd 06, 02:40 PM
IBen,

You really have written ridiculously, you know. Your anger has only
made me laugh!

Maybe you should stop hopping up and down and stop perusing the posts on
a group that is dedicated to the health and behaviour of cats? Don't
you think that would be a sensible thing for you to do?

Bye-Bye, IBen.

lastcatstanding
May 2nd 06, 02:51 PM
On Tue, 02 May 2006 14:40:20 +0100, Ellie Bentley
> wrote:

>IBen,
>
>You really have written ridiculously, you know. Your anger has only
>made me laugh!
>
>Maybe you should stop hopping up and down and stop perusing the posts on
>a group that is dedicated to the health and behaviour of cats? Don't
>you think that would be a sensible thing for you to do?
>
>Bye-Bye, IBen.
>
>
Watch it or his alter ego Jon Young will edit your posts. He calls
that a bitchslap.....LOL

Shardonnay
May 2nd 06, 06:27 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
>
>>I'll just bet you thrive on astrology, too.. Colour of cat = your life
>>is predestined by where those big balls of fire in the sky were the day
>>you were born. Same shellac..
>>You are a lunatic, Ellie.
>
>
> No, IBen Getiner, I am not a lunatic. I also have no time for
> astrology.
>
> I do not close my mind off from any rational line of enquiry either.
>
> Clearly, you failed to read my line regarding the correlations that DO
> exist, and are documented as existing, between different genetic
> features within one organism.
>
> Go apply your mind to some book of challenging text!
>
> Ellie.
>
You must be new here. Just killfile the idiot.

Shardonnay
May 2nd 06, 06:31 PM
> Ellie Bentley wrote:
>
>>Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
>>there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
>>intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
>>bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)

My black cat fits this description perfectly. Highly intelligent, very
vocal, and completely devoted.


>>
>>As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
>>for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
>>and behaving like "one of the lads".

My tan/silver Tabby is very independent and definitely acts more like a
"cat" than the black one.

>>
>>The thing is, my black cat and my ginger cat fit both of these
>>traditional perceptions PERFECTLY!
>>
>>What is more, my black cat and my ginger cat are TWIN BROTHERS who have
>>been treated with exactly the same love and attention since birth. They
>>are both about 18 months old.

My boys aren't biological brothers but they were adopted at 3 months
old, one month apart so the've had virtually the same "upbringing."

>>
>>So what do people think?

I've heard this before so I think you're on to something.


>>
>>Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
>>their general behaviour?
>>
>>I asked a professional biologist about this and he says there are many
>>instances elsewhere in the animal kingdom where one genetic
>>characteristic (even such as colour) is synonymous with another feature
>>or behaviour.
>>
>>All anecdotes (or even pointers to academic studies!) most gratefully
>>accepted.
>>
>>Ellie.

-L.
May 2nd 06, 11:31 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> joanieb wrote:
> > The animal shelter
> > told me they have the most difficulty finding homes for back cats. My
> > kitty had been there two months.
>
> Thanks. More evidence of the "demonization" of "The Black Cat".

That's true in almost every shelter. The black cats are the last to
go.


>
> Maybe these little creatures feel the rejection and so work harder to
> get the affirmation of humans - in much the same way as children in
> large families who feel alienated or somewhat unwanted work hard to earn
> attention.

It takes a special person to truly appreciate the black cat in all of
his glory. ;) They are very special kitties.

-L.

Ellie Bentley
May 3rd 06, 09:48 AM
Shardonnay wrote:
> You must be new here. Just killfile the idiot.

Thanks, Chloe! :-) (24!)

Ellie.

Shardonay
May 3rd 06, 03:01 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:
> Shardonnay wrote:
>
>>You must be new here. Just killfile the idiot.
>
>
> Thanks, Chloe! :-) (24!)
>
> Ellie.
>

Chloe???

akcskye
May 4th 06, 04:51 AM
I do not have grooming experience, but I have been a cat lover of MANY years
and with my own experiences:

My tuxedo cat was a gentleman with a bit of an "attitude" when he wanted to
be, and VERY picky about his litter box.

My black cat was a lover and EXTREMELY self centered. This cat spooked
easily.

My mom's black cat would STOP at the sign of the cross...*do do do do*

My RED tabby was basically the stereotypical "red headed wild child".

My orange tabbies are LOVERS, and will actually reach for me to demand MORE
lovin.

My snowshoe siameses I've had (one passed away Sept. 2004 at 17 *cries*) were
lovers...but ONLY to me...to anyone else...they were LUCKY if that was "the
day" they acknowledged them. haha

Kristi

Ellie Bentley wrote:
>Stemming right back to Edgar Allan Poe's short story "The Black Cat"
>there has been a perception that "little black cat" is usually bright,
>intelligent, and utterly loving and devoted. (Although some times the
>bright intelligent black cat has been associated with the supernatural!)
>
>As for ginger cats, well, "The Ginger Tom" has a traditional reputation
>for being a somewhat independent cat which is out there prowling around
>and behaving like "one of the lads".
>
>The thing is, my black cat and my ginger cat fit both of these
>traditional perceptions PERFECTLY!
>
>What is more, my black cat and my ginger cat are TWIN BROTHERS who have
>been treated with exactly the same love and attention since birth. They
>are both about 18 months old.
>
>So what do people think?
>
>Is there are theme here? Do the colours of a cats' coats relate to
>their general behaviour?
>
>I asked a professional biologist about this and he says there are many
>instances elsewhere in the animal kingdom where one genetic
>characteristic (even such as colour) is synonymous with another feature
>or behaviour.
>
>All anecdotes (or even pointers to academic studies!) most gratefully
>accepted.
>
>Ellie.

--
Mom to 4 felines and 1 canine.
Support Animal Welfare!!!

Ellie Bentley
May 4th 06, 10:09 AM
Shardonay wrote:
> Chloe???

Your comment was so Chloe . . . in TV series "24". (THE most exciting
drama series on TV, now in its 5th series.)

Ellie.

Shardonay
May 4th 06, 03:35 PM
Ellie Bentley wrote:

> Shardonay wrote:
>
>>Chloe???
>
>
> Your comment was so Chloe . . . in TV series "24". (THE most exciting
> drama series on TV, now in its 5th series.)
>
> Ellie.
>
>
Ohhhhhhhhhh.

The only thing I use my TV for is baseball, The Sopranos, and DVDs ;-)