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abby8226
April 25th 06, 02:17 PM
I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get a
mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
female cat about 6 months old.

Buddy
April 25th 06, 02:29 PM
I don't think two females are a good choice. A male would be more
welcomed.

Gail
April 25th 06, 04:11 PM
Go to a shelter and ask which cats get along with other cats. The second
part is to integrate them slowly over time. The way to do this has been
written about many times in this newsgroup.
Gail
"abby8226" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get
>a mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
>female cat about 6 months old.
>

-L.
April 25th 06, 04:30 PM
abby8226 wrote:
> I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get a
> mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
> female cat about 6 months old.

I don't like homing to females to gether - there are exceptions (my
brother has 6 females, for example) but by and large male-female pairs
have worked better in cases where I have rehomed cats.

Get a teenaged kitten - 16 weeks or so, from your local shelter.

-L.

abby8226
April 25th 06, 10:12 PM
Appreciate the input and will definately get her a little male playmate.
"abby8226" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get
>a mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
>female cat about 6 months old.
>

LB
April 25th 06, 10:14 PM
Good advice so far. THANK YOU for taking in another cat, and please let
us know what you decide. There are lots of posts here about integrating
cats over time. Head high, and be PATIENT!
My best, L

abby8226
April 27th 06, 11:40 PM
Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do I get a declawed, stray,
owner surrender. My Abby was a surrender with backs declawed and will a full
clawed cat affest anything other than the obvious?. I am scared because I
don't want to bring home a sick cat and lose both of them with vet fees that
ere outrageous. Bruce
"abby8226" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get
>a mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
>female cat about 6 months old.
>

Toni
April 28th 06, 12:05 AM
"abby8226" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do I get a declawed,
> stray, owner surrender. My Abby was a surrender with backs declawed and
> will a full clawed cat affest anything other than the obvious?. I am
> scared because I don't want to bring home a sick cat and lose both of them
> with vet fees that ere outrageous.


Don't most U.S. Humane Society kitties come with at least a two week period
where veterinary expenses are covered?

My most recent adoptee became quite ill with a terrible respiratory
infection w/complications after he came home requiring over a week of
hospitalization and extended care and meds even after that. His vet bills
of over $1200 were completely covered by the Humane Society.

At any rate I would always advise keeping any new cat separate from any
others for a period of at least a week, and two is much better. That is what
we did and neither of my other two became ill. To be fair they were both
from the same shelter (two months previously) and had already gone through a
similar but much less serious URI themselves, so I am guesing it was the
same strain of virus. Why Loomis got so much sicker is anyones guess, but he
was the only one of the three that stopped eating and that caused the bulk
of his problems IMO.

FWIW, all of mine have all their claws and trained themselves to use the
several sisal posts I have throughout the house. I have never even seen them
scratch anything inappropriate.

I say visit the Humane Society, investigate their health plan/guarantee, and
go with whichever cat exhibits the personality you most prefer.

--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

Gail
April 28th 06, 12:50 AM
The humane society should have checked the cats to make sure they are
healthy. I would ask their input about the cats there. They usually know
them pretty well.....
Gail
"abby8226" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do I get a declawed,
> stray, owner surrender. My Abby was a surrender with backs declawed and
> will a full clawed cat affest anything other than the obvious?. I am
> scared because I don't want to bring home a sick cat and lose both of them
> with vet fees that ere outrageous. Bruce
> "abby8226" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>I have a 3 year domestic shorthair cat who is pretty ornery. I want to get
>>a mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
>>female cat about 6 months old.
>>
>
>

LB
April 28th 06, 03:53 AM
abby8226 writes:
> Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do
> I get a declawed, stray, owner surrender.
----------------
If you can avoid mixing a declawed cat with a clawed one, that's the
kindest scenario.

> I am scared because I don't want to bring home a sick
> cat and lose both of them with vet fees that ere outrageous.
-----------------
You're supposed to keep them separated for a time anyway, and not just
because of potential illness. They need time to get used to one another
just being in the same house. Put towels with the scent of the other in
their quarters, and introduce slowly by letting them sniff and poke at
one another under doors. Best wishes!

Bianca L via CatKB.com
April 28th 06, 04:02 AM
Well I work for a Humane Society and since they are all independant from
eachother, their policies differ. These are the things you need to worry
about.

FIV/FELV they should do testing or at least offer it. Take it if they do. I
can't tell you how many people have passed on this option because they don't
want to fork out the extra 15 bucks to do so. We can not test every cat,
because we our broke and have to pass that cost on to the adopter. Sure
enough, someone passed on it. Two other people adopted the littermates later
on. They both tested positive for FELV and FIV. We had to call the first
people who adopted the cat to have them bring it in to be tested. Positive.
Unfortionatly, they exposed their other cat to it.

Secondly, make sure your cat now is current on all vaccines.

Ask about Pan Luk. Has there been a reccent outbreak lately.

If all is clear, the only real thing ( besides ringworm lol ) a new cat could
bring home is upper respitory. (A kitty cold.) If this is the case, get the
anti-biotics from your vet to clear it up. I brought home foster kittens and
the all had upper respitory. Because my older cats were current on their
shots, they did sneeze a bit but there was no real illness to them. Clavamox
(sp? on that ) is a good anti-biotic, but there is an even better one out
there. Wish I could remember the name.

Anyway good luck with your adoption. I can't tell you what it means to rescue
a needy animal.

Gail wrote:
>The humane society should have checked the cats to make sure they are
>healthy. I would ask their input about the cats there. They usually know
>them pretty well.....
>Gail
>> Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do I get a declawed,
>> stray, owner surrender. My Abby was a surrender with backs declawed and
>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
>>>a mate for her. What's your opinion of a best fit. I am thinking another
>>>female cat about 6 months old.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200604/1

April 28th 06, 11:28 AM
Well, I've never had any problems with my declawed cat and other clawed cats
I adopted. Of course, she still has her back claws.

After the adjustment period, they play and play/fight just like any other 2
cats.
What you really need to look for when adopting another adult cat is - has
this cat lived with other cats before?.. If it was a one owner/one cat
situation, the adjustment will probably be harder. If you're adding a 2nd
cat, IMO get one that's already used to a multicat home.

I've also been told that its better to adopt the opposite sex (fixed of
course). So if you have a female, get a male & vice versa.

Usually, its easiest to add a kitten. After the older cat gets used to the
kitten, they will often 'mother' it. Your older cat will teach the kitten
manners. Most adult cats are quite good with kittens. (Once again, I'm
assuming everybody's fixed. I don't know how an unfixed tomcat would react
to a strange kitten.)

But I've added several adult cats to my 'cat' house without any problems
after the 2-3 week initial adjustment period. My 2 adult females have been
together for a year now, and after a few months they were real good
playmates. (2nd female was a rescue kitty - she was going to be surrendered
to our local 'lets kill all the extras' pound. The city pound's policy is
to put all adult cats surrendered by their owners to sleep immediately.
They just keep kittens and lost cats.)

-- maryjane

-- maryjane
"LB" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> abby8226 writes:
>> Seen so many at the Humane Soceity. Poor souls. Do
>> I get a declawed, stray, owner surrender.
> ----------------
> If you can avoid mixing a declawed cat with a clawed one, that's the
> kindest scenario.
>
>> I am scared because I don't want to bring home a sick
>> cat and lose both of them with vet fees that ere outrageous.
> -----------------
> You're supposed to keep them separated for a time anyway, and not just
> because of potential illness. They need time to get used to one another
> just being in the same house. Put towels with the scent of the other in
> their quarters, and introduce slowly by letting them sniff and poke at
> one another under doors. Best wishes!
>