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View Full Version : Solid Gold, Chicken, Turkey, White Fish & Liver Formula, phosphorus levels


April 26th 06, 11:10 PM
4/26/06, seems to like it, from Pet Valu, $.99, high in phosphorus, too
high
Solid Gold's Chicken, Turkey, White Fish & Liver Formula, gourmet cat
food

13 ounces has 411 kcals, so by proportion, a 5.5 ounce can would have
174 kcals or kilocalories.

I talked to Elizabeth, 1 800 364 4863, and she gave me the 1.3%
phosphorus, dry matter basis [78% water]. She said that a 13 ounce can
had 411 kcals. So multiplying a smaller 5.5 ounces x 13 ounces x 411
kcals, I get 174 kilocalories or kcals for the 5.5 ounces of the medium
can.

I just tried a new cat food which my cat liked so probably high in
phosphorus and also meat since cats like meat and meats are high in
phosphorus, I do believe.

I just called Solid Gold and was able to get the phosphorus levels. I
had meant to ask the pH levels but getting phosphorus was enough and
that's it. If someone else wants to try for the pH levels, I gave the
phone number which I got off the web site:

http://www.solidgoldhealth.com/

It's unfortunate but 1.3% dry matter basis for phosphorus is almost
double what I would like for a cat food so this will be a rare treat
instead of a more usual food. I prefer 0.70% or so for phosphorus on
the dry matter basis. That's almost half of 1.3% phosphorus on a dry
matter basis. My cat drinks water pretty well but there seems to be
some research about high phosphorus levels and renal failure in cats
and unfortunately most foods that are sold in the supermarkets appear
to be in the 1 to 2% range for phosphorus on the dry matter basis.
Thus, most foods sold in the general markets don't meet my requirements
for cat food. Fussy, am I not? Well, renal failure in cats ain't pretty
which is what I am trying to avoid if possible, so there!

April 27th 06, 12:59 AM
wrote:
> I just tried a new cat food which my cat liked so probably high in
> phosphorus and also meat since cats like meat and meats are high in
> phosphorus, I do believe.

Really? Well, Wysong Chicken au Jus is only 0.20% phosphorus, DBM?, and
it's not a pet food per se, but just pure meat. Well, meat and water
and animal plasma [what is that?] and guar gum [that is a type of fiber
that increases viscosity like a fake oil]. So although it's for pets,
dogs or cats, it's not a pet food proper since it does not have
anything else, like extra vitamins or nutrients, and is really a
supplement to pet food.

But the calcium is out of whack perhaps. From Wysong, it's 0.01%, which
if true, is a 20:1 ratio of phosphorus to calcium. Better or preferred
is 1.1 to 1.0 ratio of calcium to phosphorus so could not feed this all
the time. Too much phosphorus to calcium ratio although the amount of
phophorus, by itself, is low, but would have to augment the calcium.
Phosphorus by itself might weaken the bones as I vaguely recall. But
this is a small amount to begin with, just 0.20% whereas some Fancy
Feast is ten times this, or 2%.

Gets tricky this stuff.

I forget why the phosphorus is high in pet foods, something about the
ash in the food perhaps?

cybercat
April 27th 06, 04:00 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> wrote:
> > I just tried a new cat food which my cat liked so probably high in
> > phosphorus and also meat since cats like meat and meats are high in
> > phosphorus, I do believe.
>
> Really? Well, Wysong Chicken au Jus is only 0.20% phosphorus, DBM?, and
> it's not a pet food per se, but just pure meat. Well, meat and water
> and animal plasma [what is that?] and guar gum [that is a type of fiber
> that increases viscosity like a fake oil]. So although it's for pets,
> dogs or cats, it's not a pet food proper since it does not have
> anything else, like extra vitamins or nutrients, and is really a
> supplement to pet food.
>
> But the calcium is out of whack perhaps. From Wysong, it's 0.01%, which
> if true, is a 20:1 ratio of phosphorus to calcium. Better or preferred
> is 1.1 to 1.0 ratio of calcium to phosphorus so could not feed this all
> the time. Too much phosphorus to calcium ratio although the amount of
> phophorus, by itself, is low, but would have to augment the calcium.
> Phosphorus by itself might weaken the bones as I vaguely recall. But
> this is a small amount to begin with, just 0.20% whereas some Fancy
> Feast is ten times this, or 2%.
>
> Gets tricky this stuff.
>
> I forget why the phosphorus is high in pet foods, something about the
> ash in the food perhaps?
>

Why are you talking to yourself in public?



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April 27th 06, 05:05 AM
cybercat wrote:
> Why are you talking to yourself in public?

Is that all you can add? I was correcting my first post in which I put
high phosphorus as a consequence of meat in the food. That's not
entirely correct. Probably the ash may have something to do with it.
There are a few people here who know about biochemistry and nutrition.
I gather you are not one of them.

cybercat
April 27th 06, 05:33 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> cybercat wrote:
> > Why are you talking to yourself in public?
>
> Is that all you can add?

For now, yes. It is a legitimate question.

>I was correcting my first post

Ah, I see. Perhaps if you had made that clear my question might have
been unnecessary.

> in which I put
> high phosphorus as a consequence of meat in the food. That's not
> entirely correct. Probably the ash may have something to do with it.
> There are a few people here who know about biochemistry and nutrition.
> I gather you are not one of them.
>

Quite possibly.



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