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Lee Frette
May 2nd 06, 01:12 AM
Several days ago we rescued 6 4.5 week old kittens. They had not been
weaned by the mother. We are feeding them KMR formula from a bottle
and dish, and for the last day they have been eating wet food from a
dish.

We are stimulating urination, but there is little if any evidence of
defecation. Are we in trouble?

Thanks.

Lee

apply rot13 to:


Gail
May 2nd 06, 03:28 AM
I don't have first hand experience with 4.5 week old kittens, but here is
what is on the internet:
have heard that kittens cannot urinate or pass motions without assistance,
is this true?
It is necessary to stimulate kittens of less than two weeks old to urinate
and defecate. The voiding reflex is normally initiated by the queen licking
the kitten's ano-genital region. Where the queen is not available, urination
and defaecation must be maintained by the carer for approximately four weeks
or until the kitten is independent. It is quite normal for a distressed cry
to be heard prior to defaecation, on evacuation the cry should cease. It may
be useful to use fragrance-free wet wipes for new-born babies and soft
tissue. Stimulate the ano-genital area gently both pre- and post-feeding, as
they feed better with empty bladder/bowels.

From three weeks of age the reflex should begin to be triggered while the
kitten is placed on the litter tray. Leaving a small amount of soiled litter
within the tray will serve as a reminder to the kittens of where to perform.

IBen Getiner
May 2nd 06, 09:53 AM
Lee Frette wrote:
> Several days ago we rescued 6 4.5 week old kittens. They had not been
> weaned by the mother. We are feeding them KMR formula from a bottle
> and dish, and for the last day they have been eating wet food from a
> dish.
>
> We are stimulating urination, but there is little if any evidence of
> defecation. Are we in trouble?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Lee
>
> apply rot13 to:
>
>

What is 6 4 5 ? And how are 'we' simulating urination? Are their eyes
even open yet? How can you expect them to understand any example you
might set forth if they can't even see you as you do it? I don't get
ya...


IBen

Wendy
May 2nd 06, 11:41 AM
4 1/2 week old kittens should be pretty much ready to do that on their own.
I would set up a small litter tray for them (low enough sides that they can
get in and out on their own) and stimulate them while they are standing in
the litter. Then take their paws and gently help them scratch in the litter.
Within a day or so they will be using it independently.

The change in food could have them a little constipated. I would expect that
to be a very temporary situation as usually they get a little loose when
they go on wet food. If they don't produce something in another day or so
I'd call the vet.

W


"Lee Frette" > wrote in message
...
> Several days ago we rescued 6 4.5 week old kittens. They had not been
> weaned by the mother. We are feeding them KMR formula from a bottle
> and dish, and for the last day they have been eating wet food from a
> dish.
>
> We are stimulating urination, but there is little if any evidence of
> defecation. Are we in trouble?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Lee
>
> apply rot13 to:
>
>

Val
May 2nd 06, 05:34 PM
Lee,

I run a kitten/cat rescue organization called Kitty Godmother Rescues.
What I do is use a few cotton balls dipped in warm water and massage
their bottoms with it. I also use cosmetic puffs as well, and have
used baby wipes also. Don't rub too hard, just massage gently. If
they don't have to go, they won't go. Usualy they will pee like
gangbusters. I work a fulltime job and come home during my lunch hour
when I have newborn orphans. The first thing I do when I walk in the
door is help them go, while the bottles are warming up in a pot of
water on the stove. You have to check them several times a day since
they can't go themselves. Sometimes they get constipated, and I will
put a little Karo corn syrup on their noses which will help them "go."
Don't give them any more than just a dab on the nose, or they will get
diarrhea, which is deadly for kittens. Take babies to the vet
IMMEDIATELY if they get diarrhea. Do not wait, they could die. If it
is nighttiem and you don't have access to a vet, cook up some chicken
and rice, mash it up with a little water until it is runny enough to go
through a syringe without a needle (you can get these from a vet, have
some on hand in case of emergencies like this), wrap them up in a towel
so they can't struggle and SLOWLY feed it to them through the side of
their mouth. They will usually swallow it. Be very careful not to
squirt it into their mouth rapidly, this could cause them to aspirate
the mixture and suffocate. I had this happen once by accident and
spent the next frantic minutes holding the poor baby upside down,
patting her on the back and gently shaking her upside down to get the
mixture out of her lungs. She was only five weeks old, a tiny little
thing, choked and coughed for a full ten minutes and I felt like the
most horrible evil person on earth!!! She recovered, Praise God.
Kittens have a point of no return, this is usually evidenced when their
little heads droop and they can't hold their heads up any more on their
own. I have brought kittens back from that point of no return, but it
takes a lot of work and love and coaxing and love. Kittens are very
delicate. DO NOT GIVE THEM COW'S MILK, EVER. Give them goat's milk if
you can't get the KMR. They love it, and it is good for them. I mix
goat's milk with KMR and put ground-up cat vitamins in it. My kittens
all grow up to be GIANT KITTIES. Email me if you have any more
questions.

-L.
May 2nd 06, 11:29 PM
Lee Frette wrote:
> Several days ago we rescued 6 4.5 week old kittens. They had not been
> weaned by the mother. We are feeding them KMR formula from a bottle
> and dish, and for the last day they have been eating wet food from a
> dish.
>
> We are stimulating urination, but there is little if any evidence of
> defecation. Are we in trouble?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Lee

They need to be kept warm to keep the bowels moving - preferably on a
heating pad wrapped in a towel (turned on low) insode of a dog crate.
You should be stimulating their boewls as well. Once you switch to
solid food (canned kitten food) do not go back to KMR - they should
continue eating solid food.

-L.

Joe Canuck
May 2nd 06, 11:46 PM
Lee Frette wrote:
> Several days ago we rescued 6 4.5 week old kittens. They had not been
> weaned by the mother. We are feeding them KMR formula from a bottle
> and dish, and for the last day they have been eating wet food from a
> dish.
>
> We are stimulating urination, but there is little if any evidence of
> defecation. Are we in trouble?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Lee
>
> apply rot13 to:
>
>

Their mothers lick them, including their rears... for one thing to
encourage defecation.

Lee Frette
May 4th 06, 04:23 PM
Thanks to you all.

All are now going #1 & #2 on their own, with little "outside
intervention" although we stimulate them just to be sure. #2 started
just a few hours after my first post.

The "runt" is a little slower, but he, too, is coming along.

Lee


On Tue, 02 May 2006 02:28:52 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:

>I don't have first hand experience with 4.5 week old kittens, but here is
>what is on the internet:
> have heard that kittens cannot urinate or pass motions without assistance,
>is this true?
>It is necessary to stimulate kittens of less than two weeks old to urinate
>and defecate. The voiding reflex is normally initiated by the queen licking
>the kitten's ano-genital region. Where the queen is not available, urination
>and defaecation must be maintained by the carer for approximately four weeks
>or until the kitten is independent. It is quite normal for a distressed cry
>to be heard prior to defaecation, on evacuation the cry should cease. It may
>be useful to use fragrance-free wet wipes for new-born babies and soft
>tissue. Stimulate the ano-genital area gently both pre- and post-feeding, as
>they feed better with empty bladder/bowels.
>
>From three weeks of age the reflex should begin to be triggered while the
>kitten is placed on the litter tray. Leaving a small amount of soiled litter
>within the tray will serve as a reminder to the kittens of where to perform.
>

apply rot13 to:


Joe Canuck
May 4th 06, 08:19 PM
Lee Frette wrote:
> Thanks to you all.
>
> All are now going #1 & #2 on their own, with little "outside
> intervention" although we stimulate them just to be sure. #2 started
> just a few hours after my first post.
>
> The "runt" is a little slower, but he, too, is coming along.
>
> Lee
>

Very good news! :-)

>
> On Tue, 02 May 2006 02:28:52 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:
>
>> I don't have first hand experience with 4.5 week old kittens, but here is
>> what is on the internet:
>> have heard that kittens cannot urinate or pass motions without assistance,
>> is this true?
>> It is necessary to stimulate kittens of less than two weeks old to urinate
>> and defecate. The voiding reflex is normally initiated by the queen licking
>> the kitten's ano-genital region. Where the queen is not available, urination
>> and defaecation must be maintained by the carer for approximately four weeks
>> or until the kitten is independent. It is quite normal for a distressed cry
>> to be heard prior to defaecation, on evacuation the cry should cease. It may
>> be useful to use fragrance-free wet wipes for new-born babies and soft
>> tissue. Stimulate the ano-genital area gently both pre- and post-feeding, as
>> they feed better with empty bladder/bowels.
>>
>>From three weeks of age the reflex should begin to be triggered while the
>> kitten is placed on the litter tray. Leaving a small amount of soiled litter
>> within the tray will serve as a reminder to the kittens of where to perform.
>>
>
> apply rot13 to:
>
>

Char
May 7th 06, 03:12 PM
Someone mentioned to use wet wipes on the kittens to stimulate voiding ect.
and for cleaning.
Don't use wet wipes / baby wipes unless you rinse out all the chemicals on
them with warm water.
Many cats will get a rash or bladder infection from the liquid that wets the
cloth, fragrance free or not.
There are also anal glands on the rectum you dont want to get infected or
irritated.
So just give it a rinse before you put it to kitties bums ..:)
I have a persian mix that leaves trails on the long hair at the back so
thats how I clean it off works great...
Wish they sold those cloths as a dry product!
Char

Rhonda
May 7th 06, 08:58 PM
Lee Frette wrote:

> Thanks to you all.
>
> All are now going #1 & #2 on their own, with little "outside
> intervention" although we stimulate them just to be sure. #2 started
> just a few hours after my first post.
>
> The "runt" is a little slower, but he, too, is coming along.


That's great news!

Rhonda