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May 5th 06, 04:07 PM
What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
work with cats?

Catlover Medway via CatKB.com
May 5th 06, 04:48 PM
I wouldn't recommend electric fences or collars. Here are some ideas:

http://www.fabcats.org/fencing.html
http://www.purrfectfence.co.uk/
http://www.lkegan.plus.com/Catproof%20fencing.pdf
http://www.woodycoon.com/html/cat-proof_fencing.html
http://www.cat-world.com.au/cat-worldenclosures.htm

wrote:
>What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
>railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
>work with cats?

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Lorna Kemble
May 5th 06, 05:05 PM
Electric fence?! No offence but if you planning on that you shouldn't
own a cat!!

Anna via CatKB.com
May 5th 06, 06:34 PM
>What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
>railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
>work with cats?

A harness attached to tie-outs work well but you need to stay out there with
him as being tied up makes them too vulnerable to dogs and other cats. Or
you could use a leash and walk the cat around. Some people also build
outdoor enclosures in their yard.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200605/1

dgk
May 5th 06, 07:13 PM
On 5 May 2006 08:07:07 -0700, wrote:

>What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
>railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
>work with cats?

The links to cat fence sites was the best idea. I didn't see
CatFenceIn.com so I'll throw that in. I have a small backyard (18'
wide and about 50' deep) that has a chain link fence three and a half
feet high. So I went to Home Despot and got a bunch of thin aluminum
pipes and some sort of chicken wire. I attached the pipes to the
existing fence, strung the chicken wire along above the fence, and
bent in the chicken wire at the top so it comes in at a 45 degree
angle.

The cats don't leave and don't even try. They're happy just to go out
in the back whenever I can arrange to let them do it. If I'm going to
be working on the computer and unable to watch them, I set up a camera
and broadcast it to the TV and I keep an eye on them that way. I'll go
15 minutes without checking on them if it's warm enough to leave the
back door open for them.

We had a huge snowstorm this winter that dumped, seriously, over three
feet of snow back there. I had to get the snow off of some trees and
wanted to get food into the bird feeder so I dug a path right over the
deck and all the way back to the birdfeeder and trees. Espy insisted
on going out so I let him and followed him out as he followed the path
around. He couldn't get out of the path because the sides were just
too steep. But he would have stayed out there all day if I had let
him.

Nipsy, the long haired Maine Coonish wuss, refused to go out even
though his pads are fur lined. Go figure.

raoul
May 6th 06, 03:59 AM
In article . com>,
Lorna Kemble > wrote:

> Electric fence?! No offence but if you planning on that you shouldn't
> own a cat!!

I think they are talking about the type of an electric fence often used
for dogs not the type used for cattle.

A single wire is put around the peremeter of an area and it is charged
with an RF (radio) signal. The animal wears a collar which delivers a
shock (adjustable from slight tingle to big jolt) when the animal
crosses the RF line. It is pretty effective with dogs, to the point
where the colored line all by itself is the onl;y thing needed to
contain the animal and the collar is not charged.
>

Ryan Robbins
May 6th 06, 06:41 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
> railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
> work with cats?

Buy a leash and harness. Otherwise, you're asking for trouble.

Lorna Kemble
May 6th 06, 10:18 AM
We sell some things similar to our clients shock collars linked with
barking though. I don't agree with them. There are better ways for
training, but that is with dogs. I have never heard of doing that type
of fence/ collar with cats.

May 6th 06, 02:37 PM
No, no, no -- you don't use an electric fence with a cat. I'm not sure that
all cats would even respond to such training --- cats can be so stubborn,
and they are very pain resistant.

Use 'cat proof' fence topping -- it attaches to your current fence. Wiring
slants or curves backwards \ -- so much that the cat can't climb over the
overhang. Must be added around any trees also -- they could climb the tree
and jump to another outside the yard. See the links on the American SPCA
page for cat proof fencing.

-- maryjane


"raoul" > wrote in message
...
> In article . com>,
> Lorna Kemble > wrote:
>
>> Electric fence?! No offence but if you planning on that you shouldn't
>> own a cat!!
>
> I think they are talking about the type of an electric fence often used
> for dogs not the type used for cattle.
>
> A single wire is put around the peremeter of an area and it is charged
> with an RF (radio) signal. The animal wears a collar which delivers a
> shock (adjustable from slight tingle to big jolt) when the animal
> crosses the RF line. It is pretty effective with dogs, to the point
> where the colored line all by itself is the onl;y thing needed to
> contain the animal and the collar is not charged.
>>

Char
May 7th 06, 07:38 PM
Don't use electric anything on a cat. Bad idea.
I used a long leash and harness for years. Works great.
Last year I took the leash off and kept the harness on. She acts like the
leash is still on and stays within the area she could go before.
If you use a leash and harness they need to be supervised at all times! It
only takes seconds to get tangled up or choked. It's unbelievable how fast
they can find trouble. LOL
You have to watch them constantly and teach them that there is a boundary
that they cannot cross if they are in the yard unleashed.
Stay outside and make it playtime, giving them lots of love and attention.
This would be your time together put aside just for you and your kitty.
Don't yell and scream or hit when they cross it, but go to them and say
"No!" and push their butt gently with your foot till they are in the safe
zone again.
Be consistant.
Worked for me. She doesnt go farther than shes allowed and never ever leaves
the yard.
I live beside a busy street with no fence, but the psycological effect of
teaching them{ in a loving way} the boundaries they cannot cross, works
great. Cats are intelligent and learn very well.
The rest of the time if you want your door open, I use a window screen
wedged inbetween the frame that she can look through but not leave the
house. She sits there for hours happy as a peach, safe and sound, and never
tries to jump over it to get outside.

Char



> wrote in message
oups.com...
> What is the best way to keep our cat in our yard? We live near a
> railroad track, and some fairly busy roads. Do electric fence/collars
> work with cats?
>