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May 5th 06, 10:53 PM
Dear Friends:
I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
times.
However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with. She has been doing
this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.

---MIKE---
May 5th 06, 11:23 PM
You declawed the cat and now you are paying the price. Declawed cats do
bite - it's their only defense. Accept it.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Michael Lane
May 5th 06, 11:25 PM
Please do not put her to sleep. I had an agressive cat, that bite me,
spent a week in hospital, he was my boy. I had him put down 18 Nov. 2005
& grieve every day for him. I know I will never get over him. His name
was Yes.

Michael Lane

" Say what you want and be who you are,
because those who mind don't matter
and those who matter don't mind. "
Dr. Seuss

Joe Canuck
May 6th 06, 01:50 AM
wrote:
> Dear Friends:
> I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
> was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
> three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
> for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
> spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
> It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
> affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
> three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
> times.
> However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
> blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with. She has been doing
> this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
> it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
> sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
> can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.
>

It would have been easier to stop when she was a kitten if it had been
reinforced that this behavior was not acceptable.

It is still possible to make her come around, but it will take longer
and more patience on your part now.

When she does bit, yell loudly "ouch!" then turn and look at her and say
"NO!". You might also want to carry around a water mist bottle and give
her a spray each time she does this. Eventually, the message will get
through that this is no longer acceptable behavior. Make sure to provide
her an outlet for chewing, such as straws and other acceptable items. Do
not use your hands or fingers as play things with her, only other objects.

Judy
May 6th 06, 02:00 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Dear Friends:
> I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
> was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
> three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
> for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
> spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
> It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
> affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
> three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
> times.
> However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
> blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with.

Can you give an example of a situation when this behavior has occured? Paint
me a picture and I might have some ideas. :c)

> She has been doing
> this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
> it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
> sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
> can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.

What, if any attempts have you made to deter her from this behavior? After
she has bitten you or someone else, what is your reaction? What do you do?

Judy

MaryL
May 6th 06, 05:02 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Dear Friends:
> I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
> was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
> three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
> for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
> spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
> It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
> affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
> three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
> times.
> However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
> blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with. She has been doing
> this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
> it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
> sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
> can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.
>
Unfortunately, you had your cat declawed. Biting, aggression, and
inappropriate urination are all very common in declawed cats. My guess is
that your vet never bothered to educate you on what this procedure involves
(that is, pain and amputation), and that is tragic. Please take the time to
read this web site to see what declawing involves (and make the decision
*never* to put another cat through this procedure): www.stopdeclaw.com.
Since there is no way to undo what has already been done, now you need to
take action to try to help the situation (and I would change vets and never
go back to any vet who would suggest "putting a cat down" under these
circumstances).

First, get your cat to another vet and have her paws X-Rayed to make sure
there are no bone chips, regrowth, etc. It could be that the declaw has left
her with chronic pain (which is not uncommon). I have a friend who has a cat
that suffers with chronic pain, and she has been on a low dose of Medicam,
administered every other day. This has been remarkably successful - he is
like another cat. It is a well known fact that many amputees feel phantom
pain where they suffer excruciating pain even though the limb is gone.
Something similar could be occurring here.

Next, please let us know what "kitty antidepressants" you have used (and
please include a complete list of everything you have tried). Not all of
them work equally well. Some are very effective when combined with pain
medications, but there is considerable variation among the available meds.
What works for one cat may not work for another, so you may have to try
different options.

Get several Feliway plug-in diffusers. Feliway is used for behavior
modification and can be very useful in reducing stress. It is available in
plug-in diffusers (with refills available) and as a spray. I suggest using
the plug-ins so it can be working all the time. The spray version is
excellent for an occasional use, such as spraying the carrier about 20
minutes before you take your cat to the vet, but the plug-in diffuser is
better for long-term use because it releases premeasured doses. Refills can
be purchased for the dispenser. One bottle lasts a little more than a month.
Here is a link to a study by Ohio State University:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129074611.htm

If these steps do not help, you may want to look into the Tufts University
Petfax Program (through their School of Veterinary Medicine). This is a
consulting service for pet behavioral problems. My sister used the service
at one time and had excellent results. I think the original consultation
fee is $206.00, but it includes 3 follow-ups. There is a report to fill out
first, and it is very important to include *all details*. Here are two
links -- Tufts School of Veterinary Medicine Petfax Program:
http://www.tufts.edu/vet/petfax/ About the Petfax Program:
http://www.tufts.edu/vet/petfax/about.html

I hope this helps. Please keep us updated.

MaryL

-L.
May 6th 06, 07:24 AM
wrote:
> Dear Friends:
> I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
> was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
> three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
> for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
> spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
> It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
> affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
> three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
> times.
> However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
> blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with.

That's because you declawed her.

> She has been doing
> this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
> it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
> sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
> can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.

Give the cat to someone who understands cat behavior. And don't ever
declaw another cat again.

-L.

Keywords: declaw declawing biting behavior agression aggressiveness

Ellie Bentley
May 6th 06, 11:25 AM
Jenn,

I think you have been given some very good advice by other people here,
though I do not join with the few who say the problem is entirely due to
the declawing - although, like them, I too believe that declawing is
very wrong.

Firstly, to get the declawing issue out of the way, if you trim a cat's
nails every 9 days or so, it will not be able to tear or damage
furnishings or flesh or be able to prey so easily on bird's nests in
trees, etc. Trim a cat's nails from kittenhood and they will sit
placidly while you do it, just as they will sit placidly while you clean
their teeth. Remember this for any future cat that comes into your
care.

However, the declawing issue could be pertinent to your cat's aggression
because, as someone has suggested, it is possible that your cat may feel
pain in its paws. So get them checked out by a GOOD vet quickly. I
suggest you go to a vet who KNOWS that declawing is wrong. That vet
will take care to really see if there is anything wrong in the paws.

Even if the paws turn out to be medically sound, your cat still has the
instinctual impulse to pull on its (non-existent) claws . . . and
because there aren't any there, this may cause it frustration . . . and,
hence, aggression. Somehow you need to take responsibility to REPLACE
the cat's pleasure in flexing it's claws with some other delight. You
have a lot of reparatory work to do, Jenn! You do owe your cat a lot
for what you have done to its claws.

Secondly, your cat is alone in an apartment for seven hours - and in
daylight when a cat is alive to stimulation. Your cat however is
getting little, if any stimulation. Since you have six rooms, I think
you owe it to your cat to find it a playmate, a source of interest.
However, introducing the two of them WILL be tricky since your cat has
become so aggressive. You clearly need to select a newcomer which will
be able to stand its own ground. However, once they have had their
dramas and got used to each other and begin tearing around the apartment
in chase and games, you should find that a lot of your cat's very
natural aggression is channelled. REMEMBER, a healthy cat IS an
aggressive cat at certain times each and every day. A cat is a
predator, a hunter: it HAS to be aggressive to hunt successfully. If
you disallow a cat a wild natural garden environment and cage it in an
interior, then you have a responsibility to go to considerable lengths
to ensure that the cat's natural aggression is exercised and channelled.
YOU have to play with it a great deal, make all sorts of toys and
climbing trees etc (bright feather-ball attached to a long rod by means
of elastic string will provide much "hunting/catching" exercise, as will
chasing a torch-beam in dark conditions, and so on). But, in addition,
to such measures, a second cat, I would say, is VITAL in your
circumstances.

Thirdly, as others have suggested, you are going to have to become
something of a specialist in negative and positive affirmation, chiefly
by reinforcing good behaviour whenever it occurs, so that the bad
behaviour naturally diminishes. I would not alienate your cat or waste
your energy on punishing your cat or shouting "No!" etc, but rather,
carry biscuits in your pocket at all times, and give these with
affection WITHOUT FAIL each and every time you CATCH YOUR CAT DOING
SOMETHING GOOD or just BEING GOOD.

Finally, if you can't do any of the above or if you fail in doing them,
then get in touch with a cat charity or a cat shelter, be honest with
them, tell them the whole story, give them the true history, and ask
them to find your cat a better environment in which to live.

Even the most difficult cat CAN be turned around. It just takes will,
patience, effort, and, most of all, love and devotion. Do this and
your cat will reward you greatly.

Good luck.

Ellie.

Spot
May 6th 06, 04:37 PM
Do you have any toys that you can play with her with. Stuff like a feather
on the end of a string you, can find all kinds of stuff at the pet store. I
would start by trying to get rid of some of that energy and play with her.
One of my cats favorite toys is a laser pointer. My calico will chase it
around till she'd drop from exhaustion if I left her.

Are you sure some of this aggression isn't part play to her. Alot of
kittens bite and scratch when they play and even though she's older it
sounds like she hasn't learned when to stop.

Joe gives you good advide also a water bottle is a must.

As for the declawing & biting, I'm probably going to get hell here but not
all cats that are declawed become biters and not all of them have urination
problems. While I prefer to never declaw a cat I have had to do so because
some cats no matter what you provide for scratching will destroy your
furniture. Growing up we had cats and none of them were ever declawed and
furniture destruction was never an issue but with my current three it's a
big issue. I would have absolutely no furniture left if I hadn't had it
done. Not one of my cats bite, none of them are aggressive and I have never
had any issues with anyone going outside the litter box.

Celeste





> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Dear Friends:
> I am very stuck!! I have a 2 year old cat that I have had since she
> was a kitten. I found her behind an automotive garage when she was
> three weeks. I took her to a vet and he allowed me to bottle feed her
> for 4 weeks. She is healthy and has all of her vaccinations. She is
> spayed and de-clawed. I work an 8-3 job and I am home on the weekends.
> It is just the two of us in a 6 room apartment. She has had love and
> affection since the moment she stepped into my home. I have consulted
> three vets and have even put her on the "kitty antidepressants" several
> times.
> However, she is extremely aggressive. She bites constantly and draws
> blood on almost anyone she comes in contact with. She has been doing
> this since she was a kitten and the vet told me she would grow out of
> it. The vet told me my only option would probably be to out her to
> sleep because know one will adopt her. Do you have any ideas of what I
> can do? Who I can contact for help? I don't want to put her to sleep.
>

MaryL
May 6th 06, 04:48 PM
"Spot" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
<snip>
> As for the declawing & biting, I'm probably going to get hell here but
> not all cats that are declawed become biters and not all of them have
> urination problems.
> Celeste

That is quite correct. However, there is a *significantly higher* incidence
of biting, inappropriate urination, aggression, and health problems such as
early-onset arthritis in cats that have been declawed (about 1/3 of declawed
cats exhibit inappropriate urination, for example). This procedure is
amputation, and it is unnecessary cruelty. I *do* realize that many people
have had the procedure performed before they knew what it entails. My big
complaint is with those people who go ahead with it even *after* they have
learned about the actual process.

I have never had a cat that I could not train to use a scratching post. If
that is a problem, though, then you should look into a product called "soft
claws." There are a number of people on this newsgroup who have had success
with that product.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7

-L.
May 6th 06, 05:23 PM
Spot wrote:
> Do you have any toys that you can play with her with. Stuff like a feather
> on the end of a string you, can find all kinds of stuff at the pet store. I
> would start by trying to get rid of some of that energy and play with her.
> One of my cats favorite toys is a laser pointer. My calico will chase it
> around till she'd drop from exhaustion if I left her.
>
> Are you sure some of this aggression isn't part play to her. Alot of
> kittens bite and scratch when they play and even though she's older it
> sounds like she hasn't learned when to stop.
>
> Joe gives you good advide also a water bottle is a must.

You never squirt an agressive declawed biting cat with a water bottle.
Declawed biting cats bite because they are scared.

>
> As for the declawing & biting, I'm probably going to get hell here but not
> all cats that are declawed become biters

More than 23% do in some studies.

> and not all of them have urination
> problems.

More than 53% do, in some studies.


Here are a number of studies which prove how detrimental declawing is
to cats (from an old post):

***paste***

1. "Four percent of the cats began to defecate out of box and
12% began to bite after onychectomy."
ref: Bennett M, Houpt KA, Erb HN. Effects of declawing on feline
behavior. Comp Anim Pract 1988;2:7-12.

2. Retrospective survey of 887 cat owners from private practices.
Clients were asked to fill out a survey on the incidence of aggressive
behaviors in their cats. "Twenty three percent of declawed cats
bit family members; 2.3% of each seriously enough for medical
attention."
ref: Borchelt PL, Voith VL. Aggressive behavior in cats. Compend
Contin Educ Pract Vet 1987;9:49-57.

3. "Twenty four percent of the cats had short-term postoperative
complications including, two hemorrhage, one infection, and one change
in behavior. Mean and median days until walking normally were 6.3 and
7 days, respectively, range 1-21 days. One cat did not walk
normally for 180 days."
ref: Jankowski AJ, Brown DC, Duval J, et al. Comparison of effects of
elective tenectomy or onychectomy in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc
1998;213:370-373.

4. Retrospective written survey of private practice clients. Owners
reported that "34% had discomfort post-surgically, primarily
tenderness (78%). Cats done > 1 yr had more post-surgical discomfort;
41% were still allowed outdoors. 4% reported a possible increase in
biting or harder biting."
ref: Landsberg GM. Cat owners'; attitudes toward declawing.
Anthrozoos 1991;4:192-197

5. Retrospective mail survey of veterinarians. 320/400 returned
questionnaires. "78.4% of the vets did not advocate declawing. 47%
veterinarians' recollections indicated no problems, 53% reported
complications; 24.9% reported nail regrowth, 9.9% reported
additional long term problems."
ref: Landsberg GM. Declawing is controversial but saves pets. A
veterinarian survey. Vet Forum 1991;8:66-67.

6. Assessment of complications seven days and six months post-surgery,
in a clinical setting. Two techniques for onychectomy and two
adhesives for wound closure were compared. "66% of the cats returned
for both one week and six-month clinician rechecks. Lameness occurred
in 21% of all cats. Dehiscence (opening of the wound) occurred in 34%
of all cats."
ref: Martinez SA, Hauptmann J, Walshaw R. Comparing two techniques for
onychectomy in cats and two adhesives for wound closure. Vet Med 1993;
88:516-525.

7. Cross sectional internet survey. "19.6% cats in the study were
declawed. Complication rates after declawing were not reported.
Declawed cats showed more house soiling (25%)."
ref: Morgan M, Houpt KA. Feline behavior problems: the influence of
declawing. Anthrozoos 1989;3:50-53.

8. Case-control study of owned and relinquished cats involving a
random digit dial (phone) survey of cat owners. "Prevalence of
declawing was 45%(476/1056) in the owned cat population. Among 218
cats relinquished to a shelter, more (52.4%) declawed cats than
non-declawed cats (29.1%) were reported by owners to have
inappropriate elimination".
ref: Patronek, GJ, Glickman LT, Beck AM, et al. Risk factors for
relinquishment of cats to an animal shelter. J Am Vet Med Assoc
1996;209:582-588.

9. Retrospective phone follow-up of clients. "39/98 owners whose cats
underwent elective onychectomy or tendonectomy were contacted two
months to five years (median 11.5 months) after surgery. 80% had more
than one medical complication. 33% developed at least one behavior
problem; 15.4% would not use the litter box and 17.9% had an increase
in biting habits or intensity".
ref: Yeon SC, Flanders JA, Scarlett JM, et al. Attitudes of owners
regarding tendonectomy and onychectomy in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc
2001;218:43-47.

And from another post (some of these may be repeats)
1. Veterinary Surgery Journal:

50% post surgical complication rate (Vet Surg 1994
Jul-Aug;23(4):274-80)

Greater incidence of inappropriate elimination problems: More
"(52.4%) declawed cats than non-declawed cats (29.1%) were reported by
owners to have inappropriate elimination problems." Source: 1. 50%
post surgical complication rate (Vet Surg 1994
Jul-Aug;23(4):274-80)

2. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association:

19.8% long-term complication rate (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998 Aug
1;213(3):370-3)

"high complication rate for [declawing]" (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998
Aug 1;213(3):370-3)

Declawing is 100% preventable. "The most common reason for considering
declawing is to avoid damage caused by the cat scratching household
materials", which can be dealth with by less invasive measures (J Am
Vet Med Assoc 2001 Jan 1;218(1):43-7)

3. World Small Animal Veterinary Association - 2001:

Greater incidence of inappropriate elimination problems: More
"(52.4%) declawed cats than non-declawed cats (29.1%) were reported by
owners to have inappropriate elimination problems."

Greater incidence of long-term behavior problems :
"(33%) developed at least one behavior problem."
"(17.9%) had an increase in biting habits or intensity."
"(15.4%) would not use the litter box"

"Where possible legislation should be enacted to prohibit the
performance
of non-therapeutic surgical procedures for purely cosmetic purposes,
in
particular; d. Declawing and defanging."

4. Canadian Veterinary Journal:

Puts cats at risk for leg fracture (Can Vet J 1998 Jun;39(6):337-8)

****end paste



>While I prefer to never declaw a cat I have had to do so because
> some cats no matter what you provide for scratching will destroy your
> furniture.

You simply do not know how to train a cat, then. It is never necessary
to declaw a cat unless the claw is damaged or diseased.


>Growing up we had cats and none of them were ever declawed and
> furniture destruction was never an issue but with my current three it's a
> big issue. I would have absolutely no furniture left if I hadn't had it
> done.

Yes you would, if you knew how to properly train a cat.

> Not one of my cats bite, none of them are aggressive and I have never
> had any issues with anyone going outside the litter box.

Yet...

-L.

keywords: declawing statistics data research literature

May 6th 06, 09:10 PM
Hi Ellie,
Thank you so much for all of that advice. I began training her
properly when she was a kitten. I used the loud voice "NO", the spray
bottle and other techniques given to me by the vet and books. I am
unable tog get another cat for her to play with. I have been
determined to help Michelin. I have been working on this for almost 2
years. Only now, I have looked to forums like this for help.
There was a situation that occurred when she was a kitten and I was
wondering if this could have something to do with her aggressive
behavior. Michelin was about 8 months and she was playing with one of
those feather things that bounce. They are a cat toy that clips to the
doorframe. She was playing with it, like she always does, and I found
her with the bird in her mouth and she ran and wrapped around a table
leg. She wasn't breathing anymore. In panic, I unwrapped her and
brought her to the kitchen counter. The string was so tight. I had
difficulty cutting with a knife. When I did, she still wasn't moving.
I had two little boys watching me (I was babysitting) so I started
breathing in it's nose to make her come back. After a few breaths she
did. I consulted the vet and he said she was fine. It took her a few
minutes to get back to being a playful kitten but she did. Do you
think this lack of oxygen could have done something to her??

May 6th 06, 09:10 PM
Hi Ellie,
Thank you so much for all of that advice. I began training her
properly when she was a kitten. I used the loud voice "NO", the spray
bottle and other techniques given to me by the vet and books. I am
unable tog get another cat for her to play with. I have been
determined to help Michelin. I have been working on this for almost 2
years. Only now, I have looked to forums like this for help.
There was a situation that occurred when she was a kitten and I was
wondering if this could have something to do with her aggressive
behavior. Michelin was about 8 months and she was playing with one of
those feather things that bounce. They are a cat toy that clips to the
doorframe. She was playing with it, like she always does, and I found
her with the bird in her mouth and she ran and wrapped around a table
leg. She wasn't breathing anymore. In panic, I unwrapped her and
brought her to the kitchen counter. The string was so tight. I had
difficulty cutting with a knife. When I did, she still wasn't moving.
I had two little boys watching me (I was babysitting) so I started
breathing in it's nose to make her come back. After a few breaths she
did. I consulted the vet and he said she was fine. It took her a few
minutes to get back to being a playful kitten but she did. Do you
think this lack of oxygen could have done something to her??

Joe Canuck
May 6th 06, 09:19 PM
wrote:
> Hi Ellie,
> Thank you so much for all of that advice. I began training her
> properly when she was a kitten. I used the loud voice "NO", the spray
> bottle and other techniques given to me by the vet and books. I am
> unable tog get another cat for her to play with. I have been
> determined to help Michelin. I have been working on this for almost 2
> years. Only now, I have looked to forums like this for help.
> There was a situation that occurred when she was a kitten and I was
> wondering if this could have something to do with her aggressive
> behavior. Michelin was about 8 months and she was playing with one of
> those feather things that bounce. They are a cat toy that clips to the
> doorframe. She was playing with it, like she always does, and I found
> her with the bird in her mouth and she ran and wrapped around a table
> leg. She wasn't breathing anymore. In panic, I unwrapped her and
> brought her to the kitchen counter. The string was so tight. I had
> difficulty cutting with a knife. When I did, she still wasn't moving.
> I had two little boys watching me (I was babysitting) so I started
> breathing in it's nose to make her come back. After a few breaths she
> did. I consulted the vet and he said she was fine. It took her a few
> minutes to get back to being a playful kitten but she did. Do you
> think this lack of oxygen could have done something to her??
>

No, it was the lack of oxygen to your brain that caused you to have her
declawed that caused this biting issue.

Juice
May 6th 06, 10:45 PM
wrote:
> Hi Ellie,
...but she did. Do you
> think this lack of oxygen could have done something to her??

don't pay him no mind
he's what you call a nun

ain't had nun don't want nun aint goin get nun

-L.
May 7th 06, 01:41 AM
wrote:
> Hi Ellie,
> Thank you so much for all of that advice. I began training her
> properly when she was a kitten. I used the loud voice "NO", the spray
> bottle and other techniques given to me by the vet and books.

Those are not proper training techniques.

-L.

Ellie Bentley
May 9th 06, 10:00 AM
wrote:
> Do you
> think this lack of oxygen could have done something to her??

Jenn, toys on strings can indeed be dangerous for kittens or even fully
grown cats. It is best to replace all strings with thick nylon rope
(say about half an inch thick) so that it is impossible for such to
become wrapped around the cat's neck, body, or a paw.

I am disappointed that after reading my previous posting to you, you
have come back to me with the suggestion that an incident that your cat
had as a kitten is responsible for her current behaviour. It suggests
you have not considered my advice very seriously. I think you really
should now be focussed upon a very serious effort to make life bearable
for your cat through behaviour modification and discipline with dignity.
I can't accept that it is not possible for you to get your cat a
playmate.

To be frank, you have caused me to suspect that you may not be serious.

Ellie.