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May 10th 06, 10:33 PM
I have a male tabby that I have had for almost two years. He is
very gentle and loving and doesn't demonstrate aggressive behaviour.
My problem is that I am a student who is moving home for a few
months until I find a job and place to live.

My folks have just adopted two kittens (one male/one female) that
are about six months old. They have had these kittens for a month
now and I have been warned that the female is fairly aggressive. I
hate to think of these two kittens ganging up on my cat. The only
good thing is that he is about 8-10 pounds larger but I don't see
him as a fighter. I would say that he lacks any dominate features
in his personalty.

Should I be worried? Any advice?

Thanks!
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Matthew aka NMR
May 10th 06, 10:41 PM
Not at all just take your time introducing them to each other. Seperate
rooms for the them. Let them get adjusted to each other for a few days
under the door. Than allow them short perios around one another observe
than. If any problems seperate them for a little while longer. do it over
here is some more info and a link to read about
http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/getting-a-cat.shtml

Introducing your new cat to other animals
You may need to introduce a cat to other animals (but first make sure the
new kitten or cat has been seen by a vet to reduce the risk of transmitting
illnesses or parasites to your other animals). The key to this is patience.
It may take several weeks to a month to achieve desired results; it may take
overnight. Do not give up and don't lose your temper. It depends on the
temperament and ages of the animals involved.
In most cases, you can simply introduce them, let them work it out, and
after a week or so, things are fine. However, sometimes this is a lengthy
process that you will have to work through. In general, the following
procedure will work:

Put the cat in its own room, where the original pet can smell it, but not
see it. After a day or so of this, remove the cat from the room and let the
original pet smell and explore the room thoroughly. Put the cat back in.
Depending on the reactions involved, let the cat out and meet the original
pet under supervision. If there is some hostility, separate them while you
are gone until you are certain that they get along. It is best if you can
arrange a "retreat" for each animal.
You can modify the length of time and amount of supervision as you see how
two cats react. Some forms of cat playing can appear hostile but are not.
Look at the ears for a clue (standing up or forward when grappling is
trouble, flat back when standing and staring is also trouble). If the
fighting immediately stops when one yelps or squeaks, they're OK.

Introducing a puppy or kitten into a household with an elderly animal
already present can be stressful to the older animal. The best way to handle
this is to make sure the older animal does not feel threatened by the
newcomer. Lavish attention on the older animal, not the new kitten. Make
sure the older animal has a cozy place to retreat to, and undisturbed time
to eat and relieve itself.

A puppy introduced to a cat will quickly view it as another sort of dog and
leave it alone or, more often, want to play with it. The cat will view the
dog as a nuisance for some time, but will eventually learn to ignore it or
even to play with it. Introducing a kitten to an older dog will depend on
the dog's temperament. Many dogs are good with cats, such as Labs or
Newfies, and will present no problems whatsoever. Other dogs with high prey
drives may need to be taught to leave the kitten alone. Soon enough, the
kitten will be able to get up out of the dog's reach when it wants to be
left alone. Providing the cat with a place the dog can't get to is always
helpful. This can be achieved by placing a childproof fence in the door of a
room high enough for the cat to get under but not for the dog. Do trim the
cat's claws to minimize damage to the dog's nose.

According to humane society studies, these are some combinations of animals
that tend to work well:

a.. two kittens
b.. an older kitten and a puppy
c.. a pair of mature neutered animals
d.. two cats
e.. two dogs
"NewsLeecher User" > wrote in message
.. .
>I have a male tabby that I have had for almost two years. He is
> very gentle and loving and doesn't demonstrate aggressive behaviour.
> My problem is that I am a student who is moving home for a few
> months until I find a job and place to live.
>
> My folks have just adopted two kittens (one male/one female) that
> are about six months old. They have had these kittens for a month
> now and I have been warned that the female is fairly aggressive. I
> hate to think of these two kittens ganging up on my cat. The only
> good thing is that he is about 8-10 pounds larger but I don't see
> him as a fighter. I would say that he lacks any dominate features
> in his personalty.
>
> Should I be worried? Any advice?
>
> Thanks!
> --
> ----------------------------------------------
> Posted with NewsLeecher v3.0 Final
> * Binary Usenet Leeching Made Easy
> * http://www.newsleecher.com/?usenet
> ----------------------------------------------
>