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RobZip
May 18th 06, 09:01 AM
My boy Spot did something the other day I was a bit impressed with. The more
I think about it, the more it seems like a deliberate action.

My wife had dropped the back to an earring on the bedroom carpet this past
Sunday. Naturally it blended right in and neither of us could find it. While
we were on hands and knees patting the carpet, Spot was strolling in and out
around our arms, rubbing against us and leaning up to rub chins with us.
Good ole Spot - never misses an opportunity for a little attention. We gave
up on the earring back.

Monday morning I was sitting on the couch. Spot came into the room and
started nuzzling against my bare foot. I felt something scratching at the
skin. When I acknowledged Spot, he dropped the earring back on my foot and
sat back chattering at me while I praised him for his find. I know it seems
like a stretch to attribute this to awareness that the item he brought to me
must be what we were searching for, but how else could one explain it? Spot
has shown other instances of working things out beyond what would seem to be
normal cat curiosity - finding ways into areas he isn't supposed to be in,
creatively rearranging things to make nesting spots and hiding places, etc.

May 18th 06, 11:09 AM
RobZip wrote:
> My boy Spot did something the other day I was a bit impressed with. The more
> I think about it, the more it seems like a deliberate action.
>
> My wife had dropped the back to an earring on the bedroom carpet this past
> Sunday. Naturally it blended right in and neither of us could find it. While
> we were on hands and knees patting the carpet, Spot was strolling in and out
> around our arms, rubbing against us and leaning up to rub chins with us.
> Good ole Spot - never misses an opportunity for a little attention. We gave
> up on the earring back.
>
> Monday morning I was sitting on the couch. Spot came into the room and
> started nuzzling against my bare foot. I felt something scratching at the
> skin. When I acknowledged Spot, he dropped the earring back on my foot and
> sat back chattering at me while I praised him for his find. I know it seems
> like a stretch to attribute this to awareness that the item he brought to me
> must be what we were searching for, but how else could one explain it? Spot
> has shown other instances of working things out beyond what would seem to be
> normal cat curiosity - finding ways into areas he isn't supposed to be in,
> creatively rearranging things to make nesting spots and hiding places, etc.

Rupert Sheldrake, Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home :
And Other Unexplained Powers of Animals, Publisher: Three Rivers Press
(September 2000), ISBN: 0609805339. The books contains illustrations of
cats who without verbalizing a sound get their owners to open the doors
and vice versa. Owners who don't say anything but just think that it's
time their cat reappears and comes back. I'm just surprised that you
are surprised and underestimating how much your cat can process
information. Start testing your cat. You'll be pleasantly surprised.

When I tell my cat I have to leave, she starting arguing with me. It's
too cute and a bit naughty of me. But it happens too often to be a
coincidence and only happens when I say I have to leave.

By the way, the nervous system of the cat is very much akin to the
nervous system of the human being. Did you know that?
Neurophysiologically speaking.

CatNipped
May 18th 06, 01:36 PM
"RobZip" > wrote in message
. ..
> My boy Spot did something the other day I was a bit impressed with. The
> more I think about it, the more it seems like a deliberate action.
>
> My wife had dropped the back to an earring on the bedroom carpet this past
> Sunday. Naturally it blended right in and neither of us could find it.
> While we were on hands and knees patting the carpet, Spot was strolling in
> and out around our arms, rubbing against us and leaning up to rub chins
> with us. Good ole Spot - never misses an opportunity for a little
> attention. We gave up on the earring back.
>
> Monday morning I was sitting on the couch. Spot came into the room and
> started nuzzling against my bare foot. I felt something scratching at the
> skin. When I acknowledged Spot, he dropped the earring back on my foot and
> sat back chattering at me while I praised him for his find. I know it
> seems like a stretch to attribute this to awareness that the item he
> brought to me must be what we were searching for, but how else could one
> explain it? Spot has shown other instances of working things out beyond
> what would seem to be normal cat curiosity - finding ways into areas he
> isn't supposed to be in, creatively rearranging things to make nesting
> spots and hiding places, etc.

My cats have shown reasoning power to an alarming degree (we're talking
about B*tch Cat From H*ll and the ultimate ADHD cat, JetSki (Bandit and
Jessie)).

--

Hugs,

CatNipped

See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/

stan beck
May 18th 06, 04:41 PM
Sounds pretty amazing to me, actually. I've never seen any quite like
it before in my experiences. I don't think it's a depth thing, perhaps
your kitty has learned how to think outside his own needs -- I know
that sounds kind weird. Dogs do this by instict -- they are pack
animals and please the alpha is part of their genetic wiring. Cats are
wire differently. They are more independent and tend to think about
their needs only - just my observation. You've got a very special
kitty! Thanks for sharing.

Stan

www.Kitten-Pictures.com
For the Most Adorable Kitten Pictures on the Net!

Toni from T.O.
May 19th 06, 02:33 AM
"RobZip" > wrote in message
. ..

Spot
> has shown other instances of working things out beyond what would seem to
be
> normal cat curiosity - finding ways into areas he isn't supposed to be in,
> creatively rearranging things to make nesting spots and hiding places,
etc.

That's called cat contrariness :-) Like how they come and jump up on your
lap juuuuust as you were contemplating getting up to go to the bathroom.

That's pretty weird about the earring back, how did he manipulate something
so small with his mouth?

Toni from T.O.

Ryan Robbins
May 19th 06, 04:34 AM
"RobZip" > wrote in message
. ..
> When I acknowledged Spot, he dropped the earring back on my foot and sat
> back chattering at me while I praised him for his find. I know it seems
> like a stretch to attribute this to awareness that the item he brought to
> me must be what we were searching for, but how else could one explain it?

It sounds more like he thought he was bringing you his prey.

RobZip
May 19th 06, 11:27 AM
"Toni from T.O." > wrote in message
.. .
> That's pretty weird about the earring back, how did he manipulate
> something
> so small with his mouth?
>
> Toni from T.O.

He seems to have had it gripped between incisors. I noticed that his mouth
was open when he walked in but didn't see what he had till he started
scraping it against my foot.

RobZip
May 19th 06, 12:29 PM
"stan beck" > wrote in message
oups.com...
They are more independent and tend to think about
> their needs only - just my observation. You've got a very special
> kitty! Thanks for sharing.
>
Special indeed. He's got his own needs worked out too. He's learned to jump
on the printer/scanner and activate it by stepping on various buttons. The
paper feed, scan, color, and B&W copy buttons will all activate the unit
causing it to ultimately eject a sheet of paper. If Spot only manages to
step on the power button, the unit powers up and just sits there. He will
then go into a frenzy digging in the sheet feedertrying to force it to eject
paper. The worst I've found was around 20 sheets of paper ejected on the
floor one morning when I came home from work. He's taught his mom part of
the trick too and she gets naughty with the printer sometimes.

deci
May 22nd 06, 12:12 AM
On Thu, 18 May 2006 08:01:43 GMT, "RobZip" > wrote:
>
Our black (Lil) steals both my wifes and daughters earings, then
'hides' them with the rest of her treasures behind the TV or under our
bed.. Tho' she has never brought any back by herself.
I think they carry them trapped between the tongue and the top
pallet. Thats how she carries flies. You can hear them buzzing in her
mouth when she brings them to us, just to show off her latest kill.


http://www.black-cat-gfx.co.uk/

"A cat is only technically an animal,
being divine" - Robert Lynd

Matthew aka NMR
May 22nd 06, 12:28 AM
<deci> wrote in message ...
> On Thu, 18 May 2006 08:01:43 GMT, "RobZip" > wrote:
>>
> Our black (Lil) steals both my wifes and daughters earings, then
> 'hides' them with the rest of her treasures behind the TV or under our
> bed.. Tho' she has never brought any back by herself.
> I think they carry them trapped between the tongue and the top
> pallet. Thats how she carries flies. You can hear them buzzing in her
> mouth when she brings them to us, just to show off her latest kill.
>
>
> http://www.black-cat-gfx.co.uk/
>

There is one major requirement when posting pictures warns us when there is
a cutie factor involved




> "A cat is only technically an animal,
> being divine" - Robert Lynd

deci
May 23rd 06, 02:54 AM
>
>There is one major requirement when posting pictures warns us when there is
>a cutie factor involved


I didn't actually post a pic - that was just a part of my 'sig'
............. but they are cute aren't they? Well Katy is, she does
cute for a living, but Lil? Like most (adult) black cats she looks
like she's just been spewed out of the gates of hell ;)


http://www.black-cat-gfx.co.uk/

"A cat is only technically an animal,
being divine" - Robert Lynd