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View Full Version : [OT] Does Anyone Here Have a Boring Job


Cat Protector
May 23rd 06, 05:19 PM
Does anyone here have a job so boring that you wonder what the person who
hired you was thinking when you knew you had more experience than the job
required? Sometimes I think employers look at your resume once and despite
your vast experience they think you are just perfect for the lowest end job
in their company. It kind of makes you wonder if companies are indeed
interested in getting the best qualified employees for certain positions. It
seems that the temp agencies also follow suit in this.

You can have years of experience in a certain field and yet they'll submit
your resume to one of the lowest jobs in the field just because bodies are
needed and because nobody else wants to do it. The only good thing about the
position is the paycheck and that is it. Forget the fact that you are
overqualified and capable of much more. It seems temp agencies these days
often will suggest that by taking a lower job it is to get your foot in the
door but you will often get stuck in the same position for months with no
advancement. Is anyone here working in this type of scenario?



--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com

BulletProof
May 24th 06, 04:18 AM
Cat Protector wrote:
>Is anyone here working in this type of scenario?

Oh sure..

The workplace is full of overqualified people

you just got farmed out, but chances are there was no opening for what
your skills were

employment service is dog eat dog, it's very big business yes, but in
the end, you're just a warm body that can goto the cleinte's place and
earn the agency money.

they don't really care about your personal happiness if you will!
--

whenever I find myself somewhere I don't want to be, I try to make up
for it by enlarging my circle, for example you may find yourself taking
a stapler at the end of the day..
you know you might need it at home one day...

or.. you might find yourself posting on usenet when you're actually
getting paid to do something else.

thing is.. I don't know if a cat protector is male of female, but, men
anyway, our self esteem is very inter-related to our vocation.

short story, you can't take this temporary placement and let it assign
any signifigant value about you. you can't let it speak to you about
who you are, other than the fact you are smart enough to know if you
don't do something you will be even more unhappy with no income

Take initiative beyond what they may expect of you, this can keep
dumbasses from being bossy, seing that you are doing more than they
expected. it's really a nasty thing to do, like re-arrange office
furniture. here's the worst one of all...

clean the place up tell them you are losing your mind, cleaning always
tranfers a nice solid layer of false guilt to the filthy

Rona Y.
May 24th 06, 05:44 AM
Cat Protector wrote:
> Does anyone here have a job so boring that you wonder what the person who
> hired you was thinking when you knew you had more experience than the job
> required? Sometimes I think employers look at your resume once and despite
> your vast experience they think you are just perfect for the lowest end job
> in their company. It kind of makes you wonder if companies are indeed
> interested in getting the best qualified employees for certain positions. It
> seems that the temp agencies also follow suit in this.
>

Experience is important when it comes to getting good jobs, but so are
attitude, personality, and a host of other non-tangible qualities.
Just because you (general "you") have a lot of experience in a
particular field, doesn't mean you are best suited for a particular
position within a particular company.

> You can have years of experience in a certain field and yet they'll submit
> your resume to one of the lowest jobs in the field just because bodies are
> needed and because nobody else wants to do it. The only good thing about the
> position is the paycheck and that is it. Forget the fact that you are
> overqualified and capable of much more. It seems temp agencies these days
> often will suggest that by taking a lower job it is to get your foot in the
> door but you will often get stuck in the same position for months with no
> advancement. Is anyone here working in this type of scenario?
>

Why not just take pride in whatever job you do, no matter what it is?
I've worked abroad for a number of years (most of my professional life)
and have noticed vast differences between how different cultures view
work. In Japan, it doesn't matter what you do, you do your work to the
best of your ability, and you are proud of what you accomplish (no
matter how big or small the task). In the US and Canada, if you don't
think the work is "worthy", you slack off and blame anyone but yourself
for the substandard work you produce. Or you bitch about how you're
"too good" for whatever you're doing, and you make yourself (and others
around you) miserable.

It's all in how you look at it.

Cat Protector
May 24th 06, 07:14 AM
I have both experience and personality. I have also had the unfortunate
experience of dealing with companies especially recruiting outfits where the
recruiter sees your resume and still pushes you to apply for a certain
position simply because they want to get a body in there and collect their
pay.
I take pride in my work but I think it is unwise to get stuck in a job where
your boss or at least future employer is unprofessional but expects you to
be. I think being happy in the job you are trained to do is a much better
fit than going into a job you know you will hate and have no advancement.

I know of one temp company that approached me about a job that was the low
end of my field even though the job I applied for was exactly what I was
qualified to do. Of course the recruiters kept changing the time of the
position and couldn't give me a straight answer. I also had to fill out
mounds of paperwork for one small position and wasn't even interviewed. It
was just a "you're hired" and then rush you through everything. When I asked
about what the hours were and such, the recruiter in charge of the account
said to me quite rudely "If you don't want the job, I have 3 people that
do." I was floored how a recruiter could be so obnoxious. When I asked
questions about some of the paperwork she then says "haven't you had a full
time job before?" She treated me as if I were some kid getting his first job
than a skilled tech. It kind of makes me wonder how she got to be a
recruiter. The worst part was that she had never even been to the client
site even though she claims to have dealt with them for years. If you are
the head of a project or at least recruiting people for a project you at
least visit the facility once.


--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"Rona Y." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Experience is important when it comes to getting good jobs, but so are
> attitude, personality, and a host of other non-tangible qualities.
> Just because you (general "you") have a lot of experience in a
> particular field, doesn't mean you are best suited for a particular
> position within a particular company.
>
>> You can have years of experience in a certain field and yet they'll
>> submit
>> your resume to one of the lowest jobs in the field just because bodies
>> are
>> needed and because nobody else wants to do it. The only good thing about
>> the
>> position is the paycheck and that is it. Forget the fact that you are
>> overqualified and capable of much more. It seems temp agencies these days
>> often will suggest that by taking a lower job it is to get your foot in
>> the
>> door but you will often get stuck in the same position for months with no
>> advancement. Is anyone here working in this type of scenario?
>>
>
> Why not just take pride in whatever job you do, no matter what it is?
> I've worked abroad for a number of years (most of my professional life)
> and have noticed vast differences between how different cultures view
> work. In Japan, it doesn't matter what you do, you do your work to the
> best of your ability, and you are proud of what you accomplish (no
> matter how big or small the task). In the US and Canada, if you don't
> think the work is "worthy", you slack off and blame anyone but yourself
> for the substandard work you produce. Or you bitch about how you're
> "too good" for whatever you're doing, and you make yourself (and others
> around you) miserable.
>
> It's all in how you look at it.
>

May 24th 06, 03:36 PM
Cat Protector wrote:
> I take pride in my work but I think it is unwise to get stuck in a job where
> your boss or at least future employer is unprofessional but expects you to
> be. I think being happy in the job you are trained to do is a much better
> fit than going into a job you know you will hate and have no advancement.
>
Of course it is. The most important thing about a job....to me....is
that you love what you do. That you look *forward* to going to work
every day. That you're appreciated by your employer. If not, start
looking for another job, and get out of there as quick as you can.
Life's too short to be miserable 40 hours a week.

Sherry

BulletProof
May 24th 06, 09:31 PM
wrote:
> Life's too short to be miserable 40 hours a week.
>
> Sherry


like you've ever worked a day in your life Sherry

roflmao

who do you think you're talking to?

we know all about your big food stamp heist

big welfare mamma

lol