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cybercat
May 26th 06, 05:08 PM
"The Other Mike" > wrote in message
...
> Took our cats to the vet tonight for 2 different problems...one of
> them has a golf ball sized cyst on his tail (this is the 3rd time
> we've been in for this...it kept growing and the vet didn't want to do
> anything until absolutely necessary). So we're at a point where we
> don't have a choice...looks like amputation is the only answer.

I don't understand why he cannot drain he cyst or remove the cyst.

I move for a second opinion, esp.if they did a biopsy and still do not
know if it is cancer.



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The Other Mike
May 27th 06, 02:06 AM
Took our cats to the vet tonight for 2 different problems...one of
them has a golf ball sized cyst on his tail (this is the 3rd time
we've been in for this...it kept growing and the vet didn't want to do
anything until absolutely necessary). So we're at a point where we
don't have a choice...looks like amputation is the only answer. I've
read alot of posts of people who's cats had their tail amputated but
they were all younger cats. Anyone know if an older cat like this can
adjust to such a dramatic surgery? It's not the whole tail...the
cyst is about 1/2 way up the tail so I guess he'll have 1/2 of a tail
left.

Also...one more question....when the cyst was about 1/2 the size it is
now, they did a biopsy on it. The results came back that it wasn't
cancer. Now the vet we saw tonight (different vet then the one who
did the biopsy) said she'd be surprised if the results were accurate
and she thinks it is cancer. So how accurate are those biopsies? We
thought he was out of the woods and now we're not so sure and worried
again.

The Other Mike
May 27th 06, 12:51 PM
On Fri, 26 May 2006 11:08:18 -0500, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>I don't understand why he cannot drain he cyst or remove the cyst.
>
>I move for a second opinion, esp.if they did a biopsy and still do not
>know if it is cancer.

They (2 different vets) say that if the cyst encompasses more then 50%
of the tail's circumference it's too difficult to remove the cyst.
They said that once the cyst is "scooped out", there's nothing there
to stitch back up. We didn't believe it either when the one vet told
us so last night we asked for a different vet and she said the same
thing.

cybercat
May 27th 06, 04:42 PM
"D." > wrote :
>
> If it's a cyst, why can't the veterinarian drain it?
>

Exactly. If they can do it for women with FBD, seems they
could do it for a cat, especially since a tail is a little less complicated
than a breast.



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cybercat
May 27th 06, 04:45 PM
"The Other Mike" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 26 May 2006 11:08:18 -0500, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> >I don't understand why he cannot drain he cyst or remove the cyst.
> >
> >I move for a second opinion, esp.if they did a biopsy and still do not
> >know if it is cancer.
>
> They (2 different vets) say that if the cyst encompasses more then 50%
> of the tail's circumference it's too difficult to remove the cyst.
> They said that once the cyst is "scooped out", there's nothing there
> to stitch back up. We didn't believe it either when the one vet told
> us so last night we asked for a different vet and she said the same
> thing.

Okay. But it makes no sense to amputate for a CYST. The biopsy
question needs to be answered. Either it is cancer, or not. (I sure
wouldn't amputate anything for a cyst, they are totally harmless, and
when they get painful, they can be drained via needle aspiration. I have
never had this done, but one in three women have fibrocystic breast
disease, and that is the usual practice when cysts get large and/or
painful.)



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May 27th 06, 05:16 PM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"The Other Mike" > wrote in message
...
>> On Fri, 26 May 2006 11:08:18 -0500, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I don't understand why he cannot drain he cyst or remove the cyst.
>> >
>> >I move for a second opinion, esp.if they did a biopsy and still do not
>> >know if it is cancer.
>>
>> They (2 different vets) say that if the cyst encompasses more then 50%
>> of the tail's circumference it's too difficult to remove the cyst.
>> They said that once the cyst is "scooped out", there's nothing there
>> to stitch back up. We didn't believe it either when the one vet told
>> us so last night we asked for a different vet and she said the same
>> thing.
>
>Okay. But it makes no sense to amputate for a CYST. The biopsy
>question needs to be answered. Either it is cancer, or not. (I sure
>wouldn't amputate anything for a cyst, they are totally harmless, and
>when they get painful, they can be drained via needle aspiration. I have
>never had this done, but one in three women have fibrocystic breast
>disease, and that is the usual practice when cysts get large and/or
>painful.)
>

The question is then what is a cyst?

I knew someone who had a couple of small hard cysts on the back of her
head and the doctor had to dig them out and stitch the excavation
closed. Certainly was nothing to drain in her case.

-mhd

cybercat
May 27th 06, 06:04 PM
> wrote in message
...
> "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> >
> >"The Other Mike" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> On Fri, 26 May 2006 11:08:18 -0500, "cybercat" >
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >I don't understand why he cannot drain he cyst or remove the cyst.
> >> >
> >> >I move for a second opinion, esp.if they did a biopsy and still do not
> >> >know if it is cancer.
> >>
> >> They (2 different vets) say that if the cyst encompasses more then 50%
> >> of the tail's circumference it's too difficult to remove the cyst.
> >> They said that once the cyst is "scooped out", there's nothing there
> >> to stitch back up. We didn't believe it either when the one vet told
> >> us so last night we asked for a different vet and she said the same
> >> thing.
> >
> >Okay. But it makes no sense to amputate for a CYST. The biopsy
> >question needs to be answered. Either it is cancer, or not. (I sure
> >wouldn't amputate anything for a cyst, they are totally harmless, and
> >when they get painful, they can be drained via needle aspiration. I have
> >never had this done, but one in three women have fibrocystic breast
> >disease, and that is the usual practice when cysts get large and/or
> >painful.)
> >
>
> The question is then what is a cyst?
>
> I knew someone who had a couple of small hard cysts on the back of her
> head and the doctor had to dig them out and stitch the excavation
> closed. Certainly was nothing to drain in her case.
>

Eeeyyuww. Maybe they vary depending on what body part they grow on.
I was told that they are "fluid-filled sacs" that sometimes fuse and become
hard over time. But those were specifically breast cysts. I know there is
such a thing as a sebaceous cyst, as my nephew had one on his ear lobe.
It was like a giant pimple with no center pustule, it had to be lanced and
once it was eeeeeyuuuuuuuuu all kinds of "sebacious" material was squeezed
out. The doctor told my sister that it might go away or fill again, and that
if it
kept filling they might want to cut it out.

But cysts on a cat's tail?

This sounds like a case for ..... PHIL!

Phil? Any idea?



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May 27th 06, 06:15 PM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>Eeeyyuww. Maybe they vary depending on what body part they grow on.
>I was told that they are "fluid-filled sacs" that sometimes fuse and become
>hard over time. But those were specifically breast cysts. I know there is
>such a thing as a sebaceous cyst, as my nephew had one on his ear lobe.
>It was like a giant pimple with no center pustule, it had to be lanced and
>once it was eeeeeyuuuuuuuuu all kinds of "sebacious" material was squeezed
>out. The doctor told my sister that it might go away or fill again, and that
>if it
>kept filling they might want to cut it out.


Seems like cysts can be different things depending on its life cycle
if they can go from fluid sacs to hard lumps.

-mhd

The Other Mike
May 27th 06, 06:16 PM
On 27 May 2006 17:42:57 +0200, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>Exactly. If they can do it for women with FBD, seems they
>could do it for a cat, especially since a tail is a little less complicated
>than a breast.

Well, I don't know about this particular case and yes, we are still
waiting on the biopsy report but I actually had a cyst in my
arm...started about 4 years ago. Well, about 3 months ago it was big
enough where it started to hurt so I went to have it drained. A week
later I was under anesthesia on an operating table and wound up with
stiches and a 4 inch scar on my arm where they removed it. Needless
to say it wasn't drainable. I guess it depends on what kind of cyst
it is.

cybercat
May 27th 06, 07:16 PM
"The Other Mike" > wrote in message
...
> On 27 May 2006 17:42:57 +0200, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> >Exactly. If they can do it for women with FBD, seems they
> >could do it for a cat, especially since a tail is a little less
complicated
> >than a breast.
>
> Well, I don't know about this particular case and yes, we are still
> waiting on the biopsy report but I actually had a cyst in my
> arm...started about 4 years ago. Well, about 3 months ago it was big
> enough where it started to hurt so I went to have it drained. A week
> later I was under anesthesia on an operating table and wound up with
> stiches and a 4 inch scar on my arm where they removed it. Needless
> to say it wasn't drainable. I guess it depends on what kind of cyst
> it is.

Yes, I guess it does. Sorry you had to go through that. I really hope the
biopsy comes back negative for cancer. Let us know.



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William Hamblen
May 27th 06, 07:56 PM
On 2006-05-27, The Other Mike > wrote:

> Well, I don't know about this particular case and yes, we are still
> waiting on the biopsy report but I actually had a cyst in my
> arm...started about 4 years ago. Well, about 3 months ago it was big
> enough where it started to hurt so I went to have it drained. A week
> later I was under anesthesia on an operating table and wound up with
> stiches and a 4 inch scar on my arm where they removed it. Needless
> to say it wasn't drainable. I guess it depends on what kind of cyst
> it is.

If it were a bone cyst you could get to the point where there
wasn't enough bone left after you removed the cyst and the
only thing to do is remove the tail beyond the cyst.

The Other Mike
May 27th 06, 09:58 PM
So back to the original question...assuming it has to be
amputated...will a 16 year old (otherwise very vibrant) cat be ok with
an amputated tail or since he's older have a tougher time recovering
from something like that? I just don't know how traumatic that kind
of surgery is...isn't the tail an extension of the spine?

William Hamblen
May 28th 06, 06:47 AM
On 2006-05-27, The Other Mike > wrote:
> So back to the original question...assuming it has to be
> amputated...will a 16 year old (otherwise very vibrant) cat be ok with
> an amputated tail or since he's older have a tougher time recovering
> from something like that? I just don't know how traumatic that kind
> of surgery is...isn't the tail an extension of the spine?

About 20 years ago I had a cat that needed about two inches of tail
removed because of an injury. He seemed to recover OK, but every
once in a while he would snap at the air where the end of his tail
used to be. I suppose it was phantom tail pain. Sixteen is fairly
old and anything could happen with anesthesia and surgery. If the
condition is painful it ought to be treated.

Charlie Wilkes
May 28th 06, 08:33 AM
On Sat, 27 May 2006 16:58:22 -0400, The Other Mike >
wrote:

>So back to the original question...assuming it has to be
>amputated...will a 16 year old (otherwise very vibrant) cat be ok with
>an amputated tail or since he's older have a tougher time recovering
>from something like that? I just don't know how traumatic that kind
>of surgery is...isn't the tail an extension of the spine?

Well, they bob tails on puppies, not that it's a good practice or that
I approve, mind you... but if it's a medical necessity, I'll be the
cat will be fine. I don't think a hard cyst, whether or not benign,
is necessarily a painless affliction for the animal.

Charlie