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catmandu
May 29th 06, 02:43 AM
Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart murmur he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost. The vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister and littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind cat behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long? Anyone who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate hearing about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally depressed and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other causes....Please help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine, or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!

Candace
May 29th 06, 08:11 AM
catmandu wrote:

> Is this how a suddenly blind cat
> behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long? Anyone
> who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate hearing
> about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally depressed
> and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
> don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
> lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other causes....Please
> help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
> consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
> happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
> or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
> normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
> will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!

Oh, I'm sorry, how sad. Yes, blind cats can have good lives. There is
a woman who posts here who has a blind cat but he was already blind
when she got him (Duffy).

A few years ago, on this newsgroup, I think, a young woman posted about
her cat who had suddenly gone blind (I don't remember the cause). Her
cat was horribly depressed but she wanted him to survive. Her friends
and relatives were begging her to put the cat out of his misery but she
couldn't. Finally, her father asked her to set a time limit and if he
wasn't acting better by then, she should have him euthanized. I
believe it was almost to the day that she was going to take him in when
he suddenly snapped out of his depression and began to act much better.
He continually improved and wound up having a good life again. I
can't remember the details, you could possibly google "blind cat" in
this newsgroup but I'm certain that it was a month, if not more, from
when he first went blind. I'm sure poor Gomez is very confused and
sad; it's understandable that he would be depressed. I hope he will be
okay and begin to improve. Did the vet say it could possibly be
temporary? I hope someone gives you more advice but just give him tons
of attention for now and I hope his depression will lift. Maybe he
needs to be in a small area for now with his food and litter very close
so he can find everything easily?

Candace

Buddy
May 29th 06, 10:52 AM
As cats age, they do lose their eye sight. I have had geriatric cats
who were blind and did NOT act this way at all. My vet always said
that as long as you don't move furniture around, etc. a blind cat can
function just fine. Maybe geriatric cats lose their sight slowly, so
they adjust?

Gail
May 29th 06, 04:04 PM
Please keep us posted on him. I pray that he improves.
Gail
"catmandu" > wrote in message
...
>
> Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went
> suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of
> pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart murmur
> he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with
> surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home
> and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite
> stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very
> traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a
> corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super
> affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is
> non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost. The
> vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister and
> littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and
> know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind cat
> behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long? Anyone
> who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate hearing
> about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally depressed
> and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
> don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
> lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other causes....Please
> help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
> consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
> happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
> or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
> normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
> will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!
>
>
> --
> catmandu

Gail
May 29th 06, 04:10 PM
I know you said he doesn't have hyperthyroid or high blood pressure, but I
wanted to send this blurb:

MrR- Sudden onset blindness due to hypertension is a well recognized
syndrome in cats. It can occur due to kidney failure or hyperthyroidism. If
treatment is started within a day or so of onset there is a 50% chance of
vision being regained according to Dr. Norsworthy, writing in the June 1996
Vet Forum magazine. He recommended using amlodipine (Norvasc Rx) for
treatment. Diltiazem has a similar method of action (I am pretty sure both
drugs are calcium channel blockers) so it may work as well. Your vet may
have access to information on this that I do not.
Hyperthryoidism is usually easy to test for. Most affected cats have high
thyroxine (T4) levels in their bloodstreams. Some cats have this disorder
despite normal T4 levels, though. In these cases, a T3 suppression test may
be able to differentiate between affected cats and those whose T4 levels
really are "normal". It is always wise to run a complete blood panel when
checking for hyperthyroidism since it affects other organs, including the
kidneys.

Blind cats usually do fine. The sudden blindness is a problem as it doesn't
allow much adjustment time for the cat but usually they adapt well, anyway.
I can only remember one or two pets in the 18 years I have been practicing
who really had great difficulty adjusting to blindness. Of course, some
things do have to change. Outdoor cats need to become indoor cats and it
isn't a good idea to rearrange the furniture frequently. Put food bowls in
the same place everyday. Make sure litterpans are easily accessible and in
low traffic areas so they aren't likely to be blocked by anything your cat
could bump into.

"Gail" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> Please keep us posted on him. I pray that he improves.
> Gail
> "catmandu" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went
>> suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of
>> pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart murmur
>> he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with
>> surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home
>> and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite
>> stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very
>> traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a
>> corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super
>> affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is
>> non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost. The
>> vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister and
>> littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and
>> know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind cat
>> behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long? Anyone
>> who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate hearing
>> about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally depressed
>> and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
>> don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
>> lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other causes....Please
>> help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
>> consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
>> happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
>> or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
>> normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
>> will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!
>>
>>
>> --
>> catmandu
>
>

catmandu
May 29th 06, 10:57 PM
Gail---Thanks for all the great info and for your kind thoughts! I am very devastated. Sadly, I am beginning to accept it MAY be lymphoma because he will not even drink water. I am force feeding him and he is on multiple meds. Sadly, all vets consulted think there is no chance his sight will be restored no matter what the cause. I can hardly stand the idea of putting him down but I feel so badly for him too--he seems to have no quality of life and just wanders around or sits but no longer responds to petting or treats!! Less than two weeks ago he was a happy and playful cat. I will speak to vet tomorrow afternoon and get her advice. Gomez and his sister, who died of lymphoma last fall, were my very first ever pets and I raised them for early kittenhood until now. I just wish I knew how to know for sure what to do....I so much want him to get better but feel guilty if I am prolonging a losing battle..........the problem is there is no good test for lymphoma because it can get anywhere and the treatment is dismal...but maybe this is just severe feline depression after terrible pancreatitis and loss of sight and after time he would get better...I just don't know and it breaks my heart......

I know you said he doesn't have hyperthyroid or high blood pressure, but I
wanted to send this blurb:

MrR- Sudden onset blindness due to hypertension is a well recognized
syndrome in cats. It can occur due to kidney failure or hyperthyroidism. If
treatment is started within a day or so of onset there is a 50% chance of
vision being regained according to Dr. Norsworthy, writing in the June 1996
Vet Forum magazine. He recommended using amlodipine (Norvasc Rx) for
treatment. Diltiazem has a similar method of action (I am pretty sure both
drugs are calcium channel blockers) so it may work as well. Your vet may
have access to information on this that I do not.
Hyperthryoidism is usually easy to test for. Most affected cats have high
thyroxine (T4) levels in their bloodstreams. Some cats have this disorder
despite normal T4 levels, though. In these cases, a T3 suppression test may
be able to differentiate between affected cats and those whose T4 levels
really are "normal". It is always wise to run a complete blood panel when
checking for hyperthyroidism since it affects other organs, including the
kidneys.

Blind cats usually do fine. The sudden blindness is a problem as it doesn't
allow much adjustment time for the cat but usually they adapt well, anyway.
I can only remember one or two pets in the 18 years I have been practicing
who really had great difficulty adjusting to blindness. Of course, some
things do have to change. Outdoor cats need to become indoor cats and it
isn't a good idea to rearrange the furniture frequently. Put food bowls in
the same place everyday. Make sure litterpans are easily accessible and in
low traffic areas so they aren't likely to be blocked by anything your cat
could bump into.

"Gail" wrote in message
nk.net...
Please keep us posted on him. I pray that he improves.
Gail
"catmandu" wrote in message
...

Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went
suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of
pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart murmur
he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with
surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home
and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite
stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very
traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a
corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super
affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is
non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost. The
vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister and
littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and
know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind cat
behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long? Anyone
who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate hearing
about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally depressed
and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other causes....Please
help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!


--
catmandu

Rhonda
May 30th 06, 05:57 AM
Hi there,

Sorry your kitty is not doing so well.

Is the vet sure he is over pancreatitus? I know our cat was in horrible
shape during his attacks. Each time, I didn't know if he would recover
-- but he always did.

It seems like more testing could be done to find a cause, if there is
one other than depression. Has he had a full blood test recently? Any
x-rays to check for masses?

Have you tried different foods for your cat? ProPlan has a canned food
that contains sardines. That worked sometimes when our cat was
recovering from pancreatitus attacks.

Good luck to him. We had a blind cat but hers was more gradual, and she
adjusted very well.

Let us know how he's doing.

Rhonda


catmandu wrote:

> Gail---Thanks for all the great info and for your kind thoughts! I am
> very devastated. Sadly, I am beginning to accept it MAY be lymphoma
> because he will not even drink water. I am force feeding him and he is
> on multiple meds. Sadly, all vets consulted think there is no chance
> his sight will be restored no matter what the cause. I can hardly
> stand the idea of putting him down but I feel so badly for him too--he
> seems to have no quality of life and just wanders around or sits but no
> longer responds to petting or treats!! Less than two weeks ago he was a
> happy and playful cat. I will speak to vet tomorrow afternoon and get
> her advice. Gomez and his sister, who died of lymphoma last fall, were
> my very first ever pets and I raised them for early kittenhood until
> now. I just wish I knew how to know for sure what to do....I so much
> want him to get better but feel guilty if I am prolonging a losing
> battle..........the problem is there is no good test for lymphoma
> because it can get anywhere and the treatment is dismal...but maybe
> this is just severe feline depression after terrible pancreatitis and
> loss of sight and after time he would get better...I just don't know
> and it breaks my heart......
>
> Gail Wrote:
>
>>I know you said he doesn't have hyperthyroid or high blood pressure, but
>>I
>>wanted to send this blurb:
>>
>>MrR- Sudden onset blindness due to hypertension is a well recognized
>>syndrome in cats. It can occur due to kidney failure or
>>hyperthyroidism. If
>>treatment is started within a day or so of onset there is a 50% chance
>>of
>>vision being regained according to Dr. Norsworthy, writing in the June
>>1996
>>Vet Forum magazine. He recommended using amlodipine (Norvasc Rx) for
>>treatment. Diltiazem has a similar method of action (I am pretty sure
>>both
>>drugs are calcium channel blockers) so it may work as well. Your vet
>>may
>>have access to information on this that I do not.
>>Hyperthryoidism is usually easy to test for. Most affected cats have
>>high
>>thyroxine (T4) levels in their bloodstreams. Some cats have this
>>disorder
>>despite normal T4 levels, though. In these cases, a T3 suppression test
>>may
>>be able to differentiate between affected cats and those whose T4
>>levels
>>really are "normal". It is always wise to run a complete blood panel
>>when
>>checking for hyperthyroidism since it affects other organs, including
>>the
>>kidneys.
>>
>>Blind cats usually do fine. The sudden blindness is a problem as it
>>doesn't
>>allow much adjustment time for the cat but usually they adapt well,
>>anyway.
>>I can only remember one or two pets in the 18 years I have been
>>practicing
>>who really had great difficulty adjusting to blindness. Of course,
>>some
>>things do have to change. Outdoor cats need to become indoor cats and
>>it
>>isn't a good idea to rearrange the furniture frequently. Put food bowls
>>in
>>the same place everyday. Make sure litterpans are easily accessible and
>>in
>>low traffic areas so they aren't likely to be blocked by anything your
>>cat
>>could bump into.
>>
>>"Gail" wrote in message
nk.net...
>>Please keep us posted on him. I pray that he improves.
>>Gail
>>"catmandu" wrote in message
...
>>
>>Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went
>>suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of
>>pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart
>>murmur
>>he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with
>>surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home
>>and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite
>>stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very
>>traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a
>>corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super
>>affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is
>>non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost.
>>The
>>vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister
>>and
>>littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and
>>know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind
>>cat
>>behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long?
>>Anyone
>>who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate
>>hearing
>>about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally
>>depressed
>>and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
>>don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
>>lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other
>>causes....Please
>>help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
>>consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
>>happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
>>or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
>>normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
>>will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!
>>
>>
>>--
>>catmandu
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Gail
May 30th 06, 02:31 PM
I am so sorry to hear this. I know how difficult it is to lose a beloved
pet. I think if he has no quality of life and will not get better, it would
be better to let him go. I think asking your vet's advice is a good idea. My
thoughts and prayers are with you.
Gail


"catmandu" > wrote in message
...
>
> Gail---Thanks for all the great info and for your kind thoughts! I am
> very devastated. Sadly, I am beginning to accept it MAY be lymphoma
> because he will not even drink water. I am force feeding him and he is
> on multiple meds. Sadly, all vets consulted think there is no chance
> his sight will be restored no matter what the cause. I can hardly
> stand the idea of putting him down but I feel so badly for him too--he
> seems to have no quality of life and just wanders around or sits but no
> longer responds to petting or treats!! Less than two weeks ago he was a
> happy and playful cat. I will speak to vet tomorrow afternoon and get
> her advice. Gomez and his sister, who died of lymphoma last fall, were
> my very first ever pets and I raised them for early kittenhood until
> now. I just wish I knew how to know for sure what to do....I so much
> want him to get better but feel guilty if I am prolonging a losing
> battle..........the problem is there is no good test for lymphoma
> because it can get anywhere and the treatment is dismal...but maybe
> this is just severe feline depression after terrible pancreatitis and
> loss of sight and after time he would get better...I just don't know
> and it breaks my heart......
>
> Gail Wrote:
>> I know you said he doesn't have hyperthyroid or high blood pressure, but
>> I
>> wanted to send this blurb:
>>
>> MrR- Sudden onset blindness due to hypertension is a well recognized
>> syndrome in cats. It can occur due to kidney failure or
>> hyperthyroidism. If
>> treatment is started within a day or so of onset there is a 50% chance
>> of
>> vision being regained according to Dr. Norsworthy, writing in the June
>> 1996
>> Vet Forum magazine. He recommended using amlodipine (Norvasc Rx) for
>> treatment. Diltiazem has a similar method of action (I am pretty sure
>> both
>> drugs are calcium channel blockers) so it may work as well. Your vet
>> may
>> have access to information on this that I do not.
>> Hyperthryoidism is usually easy to test for. Most affected cats have
>> high
>> thyroxine (T4) levels in their bloodstreams. Some cats have this
>> disorder
>> despite normal T4 levels, though. In these cases, a T3 suppression test
>> may
>> be able to differentiate between affected cats and those whose T4
>> levels
>> really are "normal". It is always wise to run a complete blood panel
>> when
>> checking for hyperthyroidism since it affects other organs, including
>> the
>> kidneys.
>>
>> Blind cats usually do fine. The sudden blindness is a problem as it
>> doesn't
>> allow much adjustment time for the cat but usually they adapt well,
>> anyway.
>> I can only remember one or two pets in the 18 years I have been
>> practicing
>> who really had great difficulty adjusting to blindness. Of course,
>> some
>> things do have to change. Outdoor cats need to become indoor cats and
>> it
>> isn't a good idea to rearrange the furniture frequently. Put food bowls
>> in
>> the same place everyday. Make sure litterpans are easily accessible and
>> in
>> low traffic areas so they aren't likely to be blocked by anything your
>> cat
>> could bump into.
>>
>> "Gail" wrote in message
>> nk.net...
>> Please keep us posted on him. I pray that he improves.
>> Gail
>> "catmandu" wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>> Hi! I have never posted before. My beloved 14 year old cat went
>> suddenly blind during what appeared to be an acute episode of
>> pancreatitis. He is already on attenolol for a very mild heart
>> murmur
>> he developed after hyperthyroidism began (successfully treated with
>> surgery). He does NOT have hypertension. Anyway, I brought him home
>> and he is still not eating (even though we are giving him an appetite
>> stimulant) and I am force feeding him. Obviously this is very
>> traumatic but he walks around a little but mainly just goes into a
>> corner and puts his head against the wall. A normally super
>> affectionate kitty, he does not seem to know or respond to me and is
>> non-vocal except for the occasional plaintive cry when he is lost.
>> The
>> vet said there is a chance it is lymphoma (which killed his sister
>> and
>> littermate last fall). Anyway, I want to give Gomez every chance and
>> know blind cats can have good lives. Is this how a suddenly blind
>> cat
>> behaves---so depressed and nonresponsive? If so, for how long?
>> Anyone
>> who has had or knows of a suddenly blind cat, I would appreciate
>> hearing
>> about the experience of adjustment. Was the cat monumentally
>> depressed
>> and nonresponsive? Did it get better? I want to wait but certainly
>> don't want my cat to suffer if his behavior is more indicative of a
>> lymphoma than a cat with sudden blindness due to other
>> causes....Please
>> help! Thanks! PS---Gomez has seen regular vet, who is great and who
>> consulted with opthamologist---they are unsure why this
>> happened---either temporary ischemic event, bad reaction to medicine,
>> or lymphoma (I fear vet suspects lymphoma==but all blood tests are
>> normal and x-ray was clear). Keep fingers crossed for Gomez that he
>> will adjust! I appreciate your input. Many thanks!
>>
>>
>> --
>> catmandu
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> catmandu