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View Full Version : Older cat defecating by where she eats


Mike
June 2nd 06, 03:57 AM
We feed our cats (3 - adult mail, young adult female, 19+year old female,
all spayed/neutered) on a window box in the kitchen. Over the last several
weeks our oldest cat has been defecating at the base of the window box,
mostly in the same spot (we have 3 boxes, scooped once - twice a day).
She's recently started urinating there as well. It started out happening
only in the morning, but lately both the time and location (including
yesterday on a pillow she sleeps on besides the couch) have changed. I've
been wondering if the problem may be the other 2 cats, who have been
aggressive towards her lately. I cannot tell if she is using the box at
all, but I think she is.

Any ideas on why she's doing this, if it could just be her age, etc., and
possible ways to get her to stop, would be welcome.

TIA,
Mike

Gail
June 2nd 06, 12:46 PM
Yes, she needs to see a vet. There is something medically wrong.
Gail
"Buddy" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Mike
>
> Take her to the vet. She is trying to tell you she is sick - 19 is old
> for a cat. She is probably in kidney failure. Take her to the vet
> asap. There is nothing else that you can do but get her diagnosed and
> medicated. The other cats know she is sick and that is why they are
> aggressive to her - survival of the pack.
>
> Mike wrote:
>> We feed our cats (3 - adult mail, young adult female, 19+year old female,
>> all spayed/neutered) on a window box in the kitchen. Over the last
>> several
>> weeks our oldest cat has been defecating at the base of the window box,
>> mostly in the same spot (we have 3 boxes, scooped once - twice a day).
>> She's recently started urinating there as well. It started out happening
>> only in the morning, but lately both the time and location (including
>> yesterday on a pillow she sleeps on besides the couch) have changed.
>> I've
>> been wondering if the problem may be the other 2 cats, who have been
>> aggressive towards her lately. I cannot tell if she is using the box at
>> all, but I think she is.
>>
>> Any ideas on why she's doing this, if it could just be her age, etc., and
>> possible ways to get her to stop, would be welcome.
>>
>> TIA,
>> Mike
>

Buddy
June 3rd 06, 01:40 AM
Mike

How's it going? Did you take her to the vet?????????????



Mike wrote:
> We feed our cats (3 - adult mail, young adult female, 19+year old female,
> all spayed/neutered) on a window box in the kitchen. Over the last several
> weeks our oldest cat has been defecating at the base of the window box,
> mostly in the same spot (we have 3 boxes, scooped once - twice a day).
> She's recently started urinating there as well. It started out happening
> only in the morning, but lately both the time and location (including
> yesterday on a pillow she sleeps on besides the couch) have changed. I've
> been wondering if the problem may be the other 2 cats, who have been
> aggressive towards her lately. I cannot tell if she is using the box at
> all, but I think she is.
>
> Any ideas on why she's doing this, if it could just be her age, etc., and
> possible ways to get her to stop, would be welcome.
>
> TIA,
> Mike

Mike
June 7th 06, 03:40 AM
Sorry about the delay in replying. We took her to the vet this morning; I
hadn't had a chance to check this group over the weekend and, given that her
health *otherwise* is excellent, we hadn't considered she might have a
health problem. The vet saw no outward signs of a problem - no 'red
flags' - and ran several blood tests. One of the tests that came back
already suggests the problem might be hyper (or hypo - will ask him
tomorrow) thyrodism.

I'll post more in the next few days once I find out more. Thanks!

Mike

"Buddy" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Mike
>
> How's it going? Did you take her to the vet?????????????
>
>
>
> Mike wrote:
>> We feed our cats (3 - adult mail, young adult female, 19+year old female,
>> all spayed/neutered) on a window box in the kitchen. Over the last
>> several
>> weeks our oldest cat has been defecating at the base of the window box,
>> mostly in the same spot (we have 3 boxes, scooped once - twice a day).
>> She's recently started urinating there as well. It started out happening
>> only in the morning, but lately both the time and location (including
>> yesterday on a pillow she sleeps on besides the couch) have changed.
>> I've
>> been wondering if the problem may be the other 2 cats, who have been
>> aggressive towards her lately. I cannot tell if she is using the box at
>> all, but I think she is.
>>
>> Any ideas on why she's doing this, if it could just be her age, etc., and
>> possible ways to get her to stop, would be welcome.
>>
>> TIA,
>> Mike
>

cybercat
June 7th 06, 03:05 PM
"Mike" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Sorry about the delay in replying. We took her to the vet this morning; I
> hadn't had a chance to check this group over the weekend and, given that
her
> health *otherwise* is excellent, we hadn't considered she might have a
> health problem. The vet saw no outward signs of a problem - no 'red
> flags' - and ran several blood tests. One of the tests that came back
> already suggests the problem might be hyper (or hypo - will ask him
> tomorrow) thyrodism.
>
> I'll post more in the next few days once I find out more. Thanks!
>
>
Mike, this is great, given her age, and I think is it a good thing you took
her in anyway, at her age. At 19 she is a Grand Dame, worthy of special
treatment, that is really old for a cat. It could be that you will find that
you can make some changes around the house to cut down on the other
cats harassing her and the behavior will stop. I have a cat that definitely
uses elimination to express her displeasure *shaking my head* so they
DO do it. But a vet visit is always in order first because inappropriate
elimination is such a classic sign of a health problem.

Changes around the house that I was thinking of might include
an extra box near a favorite place of hers, cat trees or cat
window seats in places that might encourage the others to
hang out away from where she likes to, so there is less contact
and hopefully less aggression. I think I might even consider
putting her in a room of her own for part of the day, say, when
you are out or working, or overnight, so she gets some peace.
It is so unusual to hear of a cat doing this near her food, I think
she might be trying to tell you something.



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Mike
June 9th 06, 03:20 AM
The vet says it is hyperthyrodism - though he wasn't sure this was the
reason for her going outside the box. I'd thought about adding an
additional box (we've got 3, and I'm pretty meticulous about cleaning them),
but do not really want to put a box in the kitchen. She gets plenty of
attention - especially as she's a Princess (Princess Pandora, or Dora for
short). Hopefully the medicine will help *crossing fingers*.

Mike

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Mike" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Sorry about the delay in replying. We took her to the vet this morning;
>> I
>> hadn't had a chance to check this group over the weekend and, given that
> her
>> health *otherwise* is excellent, we hadn't considered she might have a
>> health problem. The vet saw no outward signs of a problem - no 'red
>> flags' - and ran several blood tests. One of the tests that came back
>> already suggests the problem might be hyper (or hypo - will ask him
>> tomorrow) thyrodism.
>>
>> I'll post more in the next few days once I find out more. Thanks!
>>
>>
> Mike, this is great, given her age, and I think is it a good thing you
> took
> her in anyway, at her age. At 19 she is a Grand Dame, worthy of special
> treatment, that is really old for a cat. It could be that you will find
> that
> you can make some changes around the house to cut down on the other
> cats harassing her and the behavior will stop. I have a cat that
> definitely
> uses elimination to express her displeasure *shaking my head* so they
> DO do it. But a vet visit is always in order first because inappropriate
> elimination is such a classic sign of a health problem.
>
> Changes around the house that I was thinking of might include
> an extra box near a favorite place of hers, cat trees or cat
> window seats in places that might encourage the others to
> hang out away from where she likes to, so there is less contact
> and hopefully less aggression. I think I might even consider
> putting her in a room of her own for part of the day, say, when
> you are out or working, or overnight, so she gets some peace.
> It is so unusual to hear of a cat doing this near her food, I think
> she might be trying to tell you something.
>
>
>
> Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita
> http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

Rachel
June 28th 06, 12:19 AM
Mike wrote:
> The vet says it is hyperthyrodism - though he wasn't sure this was the
> reason for her going outside the box. I'd thought about adding an
> additional box (we've got 3, and I'm pretty meticulous about cleaning them),
> but do not really want to put a box in the kitchen. She gets plenty of
> attention - especially as she's a Princess (Princess Pandora, or Dora for
> short). Hopefully the medicine will help *crossing fingers*.
>
> Mike
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Mike" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> >> Sorry about the delay in replying. We took her to the vet this morning;
> >> I
> >> hadn't had a chance to check this group over the weekend and, given that
> > her
> >> health *otherwise* is excellent, we hadn't considered she might have a
> >> health problem. The vet saw no outward signs of a problem - no 'red
> >> flags' - and ran several blood tests. One of the tests that came back
> >> already suggests the problem might be hyper (or hypo - will ask him
> >> tomorrow) thyrodism.
> >>
> >> I'll post more in the next few days once I find out more. Thanks!
> >>
> >>
> > Mike, this is great, given her age, and I think is it a good thing you
> > took
> > her in anyway, at her age. At 19 she is a Grand Dame, worthy of special
> > treatment, that is really old for a cat. It could be that you will find
> > that
> > you can make some changes around the house to cut down on the other
> > cats harassing her and the behavior will stop. I have a cat that
> > definitely
> > uses elimination to express her displeasure *shaking my head* so they
> > DO do it. But a vet visit is always in order first because inappropriate
> > elimination is such a classic sign of a health problem.
> >
> > Changes around the house that I was thinking of might include
> > an extra box near a favorite place of hers, cat trees or cat
> > window seats in places that might encourage the others to
> > hang out away from where she likes to, so there is less contact
> > and hopefully less aggression. I think I might even consider
> > putting her in a room of her own for part of the day, say, when
> > you are out or working, or overnight, so she gets some peace.
> > It is so unusual to hear of a cat doing this near her food, I think
> > she might be trying to tell you something.
> >
> >
> >
> > Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita
> > http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

Rachel
June 28th 06, 12:22 AM
My cat has similar symptoms and is 18yars old. His legs have become
unstabble, he's constantly drinking water, has stopped eating, and is
very lethargic. He however doesn't seem to be in pain. I was
wondering, how much is the medication and how much did they charge for
all of the tests and office visit? My husband and I don't have much
and I'm afraid we won't be able to afford it. It's breaking my heart.
Thanks!

Mike wrote:
> The vet says it is hyperthyrodism - though he wasn't sure this was the
> reason for her going outside the box. I'd thought about adding an
> additional box (we've got 3, and I'm pretty meticulous about cleaning them),
> but do not really want to put a box in the kitchen. She gets plenty of
> attention - especially as she's a Princess (Princess Pandora, or Dora for
> short). Hopefully the medicine will help *crossing fingers*.
>
> Mike
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Mike" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> >> Sorry about the delay in replying. We took her to the vet this morning;
> >> I
> >> hadn't had a chance to check this group over the weekend and, given that
> > her
> >> health *otherwise* is excellent, we hadn't considered she might have a
> >> health problem. The vet saw no outward signs of a problem - no 'red
> >> flags' - and ran several blood tests. One of the tests that came back
> >> already suggests the problem might be hyper (or hypo - will ask him
> >> tomorrow) thyrodism.
> >>
> >> I'll post more in the next few days once I find out more. Thanks!
> >>
> >>
> > Mike, this is great, given her age, and I think is it a good thing you
> > took
> > her in anyway, at her age. At 19 she is a Grand Dame, worthy of special
> > treatment, that is really old for a cat. It could be that you will find
> > that
> > you can make some changes around the house to cut down on the other
> > cats harassing her and the behavior will stop. I have a cat that
> > definitely
> > uses elimination to express her displeasure *shaking my head* so they
> > DO do it. But a vet visit is always in order first because inappropriate
> > elimination is such a classic sign of a health problem.
> >
> > Changes around the house that I was thinking of might include
> > an extra box near a favorite place of hers, cat trees or cat
> > window seats in places that might encourage the others to
> > hang out away from where she likes to, so there is less contact
> > and hopefully less aggression. I think I might even consider
> > putting her in a room of her own for part of the day, say, when
> > you are out or working, or overnight, so she gets some peace.
> > It is so unusual to hear of a cat doing this near her food, I think
> > she might be trying to tell you something.
> >
> >
> >
> > Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita
> > http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

cybercat
June 28th 06, 12:34 AM
"Rachel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My cat has similar symptoms and is 18yars old. His legs have become
> unstabble, he's constantly drinking water, has stopped eating, and is
> very lethargic. He however doesn't seem to be in pain. I was
> wondering, how much is the medication and how much did they charge for
> all of the tests and office visit? My husband and I don't have much
> and I'm afraid we won't be able to afford it. It's breaking my heart.
> Thanks!
>

Rachel. What would you do if it were a child? Take care of your
cat. Find the money.



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