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jmc
June 2nd 06, 01:02 PM
Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
about her mental state.

She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
her is growling.

Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
"attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.

This is just not like her, and by all reports, she wasn't like that at
the UK cattery. What the hell happened to her during her flights?

I did not get reports like this during the last time she was in
quarantine there. And she was a wreck when I got her out - thin, and
completely, utterly stressed. It was two weeks before she behaved
anything like her old self. And she was only 3 back then. She's now 10.

What I'm wondering is, how mentally resilient are cats? Will I get back
a cat that will now always be aggressive? What can I do besides the
usual when introducing a cat to a new home, to help her recover from
what she apparently considers hell?

On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.

jmc

June 2nd 06, 08:51 PM
Well, try to look at it from her point of view. Clearly she had a
stressful and upsetting
time seven years ago, and she didn't forget it, although she did
recover. And now it's happening AGAIN. She's mad and upset and worried
and stressed and older "everythings" are often less resilient than
young uns. I have a formerly traumatized cat,
and although she has become a lovely and sweet purr muffin, when she
gets upset about something - she retreats quickly and unforgivably to
the fear place and it always takes a while for her to let go of it.
Every vet visit and even flea medication application takes a while to
recover from. That's how she is.

Your cat experienced some trauma the last time and she has gone to a
place of fear and anger during this latest stressor. If she is a loved
animal, and clearly she is, she will put herself back together, but it
will take some time. Any cat can be aggressive if stressed and upset
enough.

The best thing you can do is get her out of there as quickly as
possible and try to set up a secure and stable routine for her in the
new house. Buy, replace, take out as many familiar things as you can -
especially her things like toys, beds, fabrics, food bowls, cat trees
and so on. Fill the house with things that smell like you that she can
lie on, sniff, and be with - so it's clear that she is with you again.
Try to regularize feeding times as much as possible so she knows what
to expect. And give her lots of space. It'll be tempting to love her to
death, but that may end up overwhelming her. Just try to act very
nornal and let her come to you as she calms down. And try to let go of
the idea that she is permanently changed. That anxiety will be palpable
to her and it won't help. She's still Meep. She's just scared and angry
Meep.

It may take a month or two for her to fully calm down, but she will.
Just be patient.

Best,

Tracy
jmc wrote:
> Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
> quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
> good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
> about her mental state.
>
> She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
> little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
> her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
> her is growling.
>
> Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
> "attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.
>
> This is just not like her, and by all reports, she wasn't like that at
> the UK cattery. What the hell happened to her during her flights?
>
> I did not get reports like this during the last time she was in
> quarantine there. And she was a wreck when I got her out - thin, and
> completely, utterly stressed. It was two weeks before she behaved
> anything like her old self. And she was only 3 back then. She's now 10.
>
> What I'm wondering is, how mentally resilient are cats? Will I get back
> a cat that will now always be aggressive? What can I do besides the
> usual when introducing a cat to a new home, to help her recover from
> what she apparently considers hell?
>
> On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
> However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.
>
> jmc

jmc
June 2nd 06, 09:57 PM
Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (6/2/2006 3:51 PM):
> jmc wrote:
>> Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
>> quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
>> good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
>> about her mental state.
>>
>> She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
>> little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
>> her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
>> her is growling.
>>
>> Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
>> "attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.
>>
>> This is just not like her, and by all reports, she wasn't like that at
>> the UK cattery. What the hell happened to her during her flights?
>>
>> I did not get reports like this during the last time she was in
>> quarantine there. And she was a wreck when I got her out - thin, and
>> completely, utterly stressed. It was two weeks before she behaved
>> anything like her old self. And she was only 3 back then. She's now 10.
>>
>> What I'm wondering is, how mentally resilient are cats? Will I get back
>> a cat that will now always be aggressive? What can I do besides the
>> usual when introducing a cat to a new home, to help her recover from
>> what she apparently considers hell?
>>
>> On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
>> However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.
>>
>> jmc
>

> Well, try to look at it from her point of view. Clearly she had a
> stressful and upsetting
> time seven years ago, and she didn't forget it, although she did
> recover. And now it's happening AGAIN. She's mad and upset and worried
> and stressed and older "everythings" are often less resilient than
> young uns. I have a formerly traumatized cat,
> and although she has become a lovely and sweet purr muffin, when she
> gets upset about something - she retreats quickly and unforgivably to
> the fear place and it always takes a while for her to let go of it.
> Every vet visit and even flea medication application takes a while to
> recover from. That's how she is.
>
> Your cat experienced some trauma the last time and she has gone to a
> place of fear and anger during this latest stressor. If she is a loved
> animal, and clearly she is, she will put herself back together, but it
> will take some time. Any cat can be aggressive if stressed and upset
> enough.
>
> The best thing you can do is get her out of there as quickly as
> possible and try to set up a secure and stable routine for her in the
> new house. Buy, replace, take out as many familiar things as you can -
> especially her things like toys, beds, fabrics, food bowls, cat trees
> and so on. Fill the house with things that smell like you that she can
> lie on, sniff, and be with - so it's clear that she is with you again.
> Try to regularize feeding times as much as possible so she knows what
> to expect. And give her lots of space. It'll be tempting to love her to
> death, but that may end up overwhelming her. Just try to act very
> nornal and let her come to you as she calms down. And try to let go of
> the idea that she is permanently changed. That anxiety will be palpable
> to her and it won't help. She's still Meep. She's just scared and angry
> Meep.
>
> It may take a month or two for her to fully calm down, but she will.
> Just be patient.
>
> Best,
>
> Tracy

Tracy:

Thanks. I'll be doing what I can to help her settle: we have mailed
some of her stuff ahead - litterbox, food bowls, toy or two - and have
arranged for someone to set them up in our bedroom before we arrive. I
tried to arrange for some Feliway as well, but wasn't able to,
unfortunately.

She'll live in the bedroom for a couple of days until she settles a bit,
then we'll let her out in the rest of the house. If we can get our
household stuff in quickly, we'll just leave her in the bedroom until we
get our stuff, then she'll go out into a house with her furniture and
everything.

Only two more weeks to go!

jmc

jmc
June 5th 06, 02:37 PM
Suddenly, without warning, jmc exclaimed (6/2/2006 8:02 AM):
> Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
> quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
> good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
> about her mental state.
>
> She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
> little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
> her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
> her is growling.
>
> Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
> "attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.
>
<snip>
> On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
> However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.
>
> jmc

Finally heard from the vet. Meep's fine, but needed an enema (she sheds
when stressed and all her hair comes out that end, so I'm not suprised).
No sign of cystitis (whew!) Vet described her as "friendly" so I
guess the handler may have been exaggerating a mite. She did supply a
bunch of c/d food so she'll stay healthy.

The visit was on the expensive side for what was basically "worried
mommy syndrome" but still worth it in my estimation!

We're reunited next Friday (16 June). Haven't seen her since mid-April.
Can't wait to see her again!

jmc

-L.
June 5th 06, 05:08 PM
jmc wrote:
>
> Finally heard from the vet. Meep's fine, but needed an enema (she sheds
> when stressed and all her hair comes out that end, so I'm not suprised).
> No sign of cystitis (whew!) Vet described her as "friendly" so I
> guess the handler may have been exaggerating a mite.

Cats can decide they don't like a specific handler - I have seen it
while working at the vet.

> She did supply a
> bunch of c/d food so she'll stay healthy.
>
> The visit was on the expensive side for what was basically "worried
> mommy syndrome" but still worth it in my estimation!
>
> We're reunited next Friday (16 June). Haven't seen her since mid-April.
> Can't wait to see her again!
>

That has to be hard on her, but she will bounce back. I knew a client
borded his cats for 11 months - at the vet, in cages. It took the cats
3 weeks to come back to their original selves, but they finally did.
One of them, Cookie, wouldn't come out from under chairs as she was
used to having a roof over her head in a cage. It was sick.

-L.

June 6th 06, 12:58 AM
I totally agree with Tracy! That is REALLY rough on a cat... I wouldn't
want her to be there one extra second more than she has to be. I do
believe she can put herself back together, but hopefully she won't ever
have to go through this again- it sure must be scary for her!

Good luck with her... and an update would be great- I feel so bad that
she is stuck there. How long will she be there for?

Angeleyes
www.IHeartPaws.com - Pet Community & Pet Forums ... Come join us!


wrote:
> Well, try to look at it from her point of view. Clearly she had a
> stressful and upsetting
> time seven years ago, and she didn't forget it, although she did
> recover. And now it's happening AGAIN. She's mad and upset and worried
> and stressed and older "everythings" are often less resilient than
> young uns. I have a formerly traumatized cat,
> and although she has become a lovely and sweet purr muffin, when she
> gets upset about something - she retreats quickly and unforgivably to
> the fear place and it always takes a while for her to let go of it.
> Every vet visit and even flea medication application takes a while to
> recover from. That's how she is.
>
> Your cat experienced some trauma the last time and she has gone to a
> place of fear and anger during this latest stressor. If she is a loved
> animal, and clearly she is, she will put herself back together, but it
> will take some time. Any cat can be aggressive if stressed and upset
> enough.
>
> The best thing you can do is get her out of there as quickly as
> possible and try to set up a secure and stable routine for her in the
> new house. Buy, replace, take out as many familiar things as you can -
> especially her things like toys, beds, fabrics, food bowls, cat trees
> and so on. Fill the house with things that smell like you that she can
> lie on, sniff, and be with - so it's clear that she is with you again.
> Try to regularize feeding times as much as possible so she knows what
> to expect. And give her lots of space. It'll be tempting to love her to
> death, but that may end up overwhelming her. Just try to act very
> nornal and let her come to you as she calms down. And try to let go of
> the idea that she is permanently changed. That anxiety will be palpable
> to her and it won't help. She's still Meep. She's just scared and angry
> Meep.
>
> It may take a month or two for her to fully calm down, but she will.
> Just be patient.
>
> Best,
>
> Tracy
> jmc wrote:
> > Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
> > quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
> > good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
> > about her mental state.
> >
> > She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
> > little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
> > her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
> > her is growling.
> >
> > Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
> > "attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.
> >
> > This is just not like her, and by all reports, she wasn't like that at
> > the UK cattery. What the hell happened to her during her flights?
> >
> > I did not get reports like this during the last time she was in
> > quarantine there. And she was a wreck when I got her out - thin, and
> > completely, utterly stressed. It was two weeks before she behaved
> > anything like her old self. And she was only 3 back then. She's now 10.
> >
> > What I'm wondering is, how mentally resilient are cats? Will I get back
> > a cat that will now always be aggressive? What can I do besides the
> > usual when introducing a cat to a new home, to help her recover from
> > what she apparently considers hell?
> >
> > On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
> > However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.
> >
> > jmc

June 6th 06, 01:00 AM
Sorry- I see now that she is coming out on the 16th! You must be so
excited!!! Let us know how she is doing... only 11 days to go! (How
long is the total quarentine?)

Angeleyes
www.IHeartPaws.com - Pet Community & Pet Forums ... Come join us!


wrote:
> I totally agree with Tracy! That is REALLY rough on a cat... I wouldn't
> want her to be there one extra second more than she has to be. I do
> believe she can put herself back together, but hopefully she won't ever
> have to go through this again- it sure must be scary for her!
>
> Good luck with her... and an update would be great- I feel so bad that
> she is stuck there. How long will she be there for?
>
> Angeleyes
> www.IHeartPaws.com - Pet Community & Pet Forums ... Come join us!
>
>
> wrote:
> > Well, try to look at it from her point of view. Clearly she had a
> > stressful and upsetting
> > time seven years ago, and she didn't forget it, although she did
> > recover. And now it's happening AGAIN. She's mad and upset and worried
> > and stressed and older "everythings" are often less resilient than
> > young uns. I have a formerly traumatized cat,
> > and although she has become a lovely and sweet purr muffin, when she
> > gets upset about something - she retreats quickly and unforgivably to
> > the fear place and it always takes a while for her to let go of it.
> > Every vet visit and even flea medication application takes a while to
> > recover from. That's how she is.
> >
> > Your cat experienced some trauma the last time and she has gone to a
> > place of fear and anger during this latest stressor. If she is a loved
> > animal, and clearly she is, she will put herself back together, but it
> > will take some time. Any cat can be aggressive if stressed and upset
> > enough.
> >
> > The best thing you can do is get her out of there as quickly as
> > possible and try to set up a secure and stable routine for her in the
> > new house. Buy, replace, take out as many familiar things as you can -
> > especially her things like toys, beds, fabrics, food bowls, cat trees
> > and so on. Fill the house with things that smell like you that she can
> > lie on, sniff, and be with - so it's clear that she is with you again.
> > Try to regularize feeding times as much as possible so she knows what
> > to expect. And give her lots of space. It'll be tempting to love her to
> > death, but that may end up overwhelming her. Just try to act very
> > nornal and let her come to you as she calms down. And try to let go of
> > the idea that she is permanently changed. That anxiety will be palpable
> > to her and it won't help. She's still Meep. She's just scared and angry
> > Meep.
> >
> > It may take a month or two for her to fully calm down, but she will.
> > Just be patient.
> >
> > Best,
> >
> > Tracy
> > jmc wrote:
> > > Some of you have read my posts about Meep's ordeal in Australian
> > > quarantine (nothing against the quarantine place, they've been very
> > > good). Physically, she seems to be doing fine, but I'm very worried
> > > about her mental state.
> > >
> > > She's always been a very passive cat. She's one of those "curl into a
> > > little black ball and shake" type, with strangers. I've never even seen
> > > her swat at someone (including us). The worse aggression I've seen from
> > > her is growling.
> > >
> > > Well, the report from her handler is that she's "aggressive" and
> > > "attacks" her if she tries to approach the igloo.
> > >
> > > This is just not like her, and by all reports, she wasn't like that at
> > > the UK cattery. What the hell happened to her during her flights?
> > >
> > > I did not get reports like this during the last time she was in
> > > quarantine there. And she was a wreck when I got her out - thin, and
> > > completely, utterly stressed. It was two weeks before she behaved
> > > anything like her old self. And she was only 3 back then. She's now 10.
> > >
> > > What I'm wondering is, how mentally resilient are cats? Will I get back
> > > a cat that will now always be aggressive? What can I do besides the
> > > usual when introducing a cat to a new home, to help her recover from
> > > what she apparently considers hell?
> > >
> > > On the good side, they did have a vet look at her (at my request).
> > > However, the vet hasn't contacted me yet with her observations.
> > >
> > > jmc

jmc
June 6th 06, 03:46 AM
Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (6/5/2006
8:00 PM):
> Sorry- I see now that she is coming out on the 16th! You must be so
> excited!!! Let us know how she is doing... only 11 days to go! (How
> long is the total quarentine?)
>
> Angeleyes

30 days. But due to logistical issues, she was in a cattery for 30 days
prior to that...

jmc