PDA

View Full Version : "What's Wrong With America's Cats?"


Kiran
June 9th 06, 07:37 AM
http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/hn/what's_wrong_with_americas_cats

What's Wrong With America's Cats?

Renowned veterinary behaviorist Dr. Nicholas Dodman has said that
American cats suffer from something called ³the Hotel California
syndrome.² Itıs a nice enough place, he says, but you canıt get out.
And not only can you not get out, but thereıs not much to do while
youıre there. Chicago-based syndicated pet columnist Steve Dale takes
the plight of Americaıs most popular pets to heart, saying, ³We donıt
give our cats enough credit.²

³Our nation has apparently decided to minimize expectations where cats
are concerned,² says Dale, ³and to expect that when everyone gathers at
Aunt Berthaıs house for holidays, the cat will dive under the bed every
time someone comes through the door. Weıve adopted a perception of them
as moody, aloof, lazy, antisocial, impersonal and anxious creatures *
and itıs a self-fulfilling prophecy. We treat them as though they are
that way, and they become that way. I maintain that doesnıt have to
happen.²

Lords of the Indoor Jungle? But arenıt cats just miniature Lords of the
Jungle? Arenıt they just born confident?

No. Theyıre so different from cats, lions might as well be dogs, Dale
explains ruefully. ³That perception, however, may be why so many people
think cats donıt need human contact. Cats may look and move like
miniature lions,² he concedes, ³but thatıs where the similarity ends.²

Lions hunt regularly, raise families, have a social life, play and
practice stalking. Dogs get played with, taught tricks and get
exercised and taken out frequently, sometimes to strange, interesting
new places. Both species get to use their brains a lot. ³In contrast,
cats,² he continues, ³with just as much brain and even more curiosity,
donıt have nearly as much of an outlet for them. People donıt have to
walk their cats twice a day, so that opportunity for experience and
play is lost. We donıt interact with our cats nearly as much as we do
with our dogs.²

Raising Confident Cats Donıt look at your pet couch potato and panic.
In fact, no matter how old your cat is, whether you raised her from a
kitten or got him from the shelter as an anxious adult, youıll find
instilling confidence in your cat is fun and easy; and the ³pawsitive²
effects may surprise.

Socialize them: Donıt insulate cats from the noisy or unfamiliar
happenings of everyday life. Handle them from day one, and expose them
to as many different * and different looking * people and things as
possible. Dogs; men with cowboy hats, ZZ Top beards or Hasidic
hairstyles; small children; people with wheelchairs and walkers. Just
donıt let them be recluses. If they donıt like this exposure, make each
such occasion a pleasant one by accompanying it with treats.

Games, trick and toys: Play games with your cat. Hide-and-seek starts
with you hiding your face in front of your cat, down on its level. When
she reaches out and touches you, she gets a treat. Then move down the
hall or to the end of the couch and let her ³find² you, again for a
reward. ³Soon,² Dale, promises, ³you wonıt be able to hide where she
canıt find you, because she knows thereıs a treat when she does.²

Safe, high places: Cat trees, piano tops and safe window ledges all
form vantage points which cats find essential. ³We canıt all afford
those several-hundred-dollar trees,² Dale says, ³but height and
security are very important. If a cat feels uncomfortable, instead of
diving and hiding, it can climb to a high spot.² Multiple-cat owners
should introduce the cats to the tree all at once. ³If one cat marks it
first, the other(s) may think itıs off-limits.² Window ledges with
locking screen windows give a cat a safely fascinating view of the
outdoors.

Raising a confident kitten involves a greater commitment of time and
energy than raising an under-the-bed diver. But the pet you get will be
a far more agreeable companion.

Excerpts taken from "What's Wrong With America's Cats?" article by
Angela Hunter Richardson in 1998 Special Issue of Pet Life Magazine

jc
June 20th 06, 03:43 AM
good advice. until they run away and feak. your model depends on a normal,
non-neurotic cat my black cat hides if its not me

PawsForThought
June 21st 06, 06:33 PM
jc wrote:
> good advice. until they run away and feak. your model depends on a normal,
> non-neurotic cat my black cat hides if its not me

My cats love when people come over, especially my boy cat. He has to
greet whoever comes in the door and then continue to check them out.
Hopefully he'll like the person and ask for a belly rub. My female is
more shy but she doesn't hide. Now my last cat hated anyone but us so
she would hide when people would come over.

Lauren

see my cats: http://tinyurl.com/8glfv

Ivor Jones
July 7th 06, 03:46 PM
"Kiran" > wrote in message

> http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/hn/what's_wrong_with_americas_cats
>
> What's Wrong With America's Cats?

Most of them are kept prisoner indoors.

Ivor

Mike
July 8th 06, 03:46 PM
Personally, I'd they rather remain indoors than be outside, where they're
exposed to all kinds of disease; rampantly breeding; killing off all kinds
of small wildlife faster than humans are destroying larger wildlife;
drastically shorterning their lifespan due to exposure to humans who hate
cats and set out antifreeze in their backyards, or children (and adults)
with hammers and sharp objects who think it's "fun" to terrorize a cat, or
getting run over by a car.


"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> "Kiran" > wrote in message
>
>> http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/hn/what's_wrong_with_americas_cats
>>
>> What's Wrong With America's Cats?
>
> Most of them are kept prisoner indoors.
>
> Ivor
>
>

Marvel
July 10th 06, 07:24 AM
"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> "Kiran" > wrote in message
>
>> http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/hn/what's_wrong_with_americas_cats
>>
>> What's Wrong With America's Cats?
>
> Most of them are kept prisoner indoors.
>
> Ivor
>
>
That's where they oughtta be too