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Kiran
June 9th 06, 07:51 AM
http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/bt/is_your_cat_crazy

Is Your Cat Crazy?

As a feline behaviorist, I get countless calls from owners claiming
that their cats arenıt normal. ³My catıs gone crazy!² theyıll say, or
³I have the weirdest cat in the world!² Is it true? Are these cats
abnormal? No. Most of those cats are very normal, but that always
surprises their owners.

Understanding ŒCat Normalı

While there are cats out there displaying truly abnormal behaviors,
many of the problems we as owners label as out of the ordinary are
actually perfectly reasonable for a cat * not necessarily acceptable,
but what might be termed Œcat normalı all the same. An ownerıs
understanding of whatıs normal for a cat and whatıs not determines how
successful he or she can be in changing a behavior.

Cat Logic

The most common behavior problem, the one that causes most owners to
stare bug-eyed at their cats and scream, ³WHATıS WRONG WITH YOU?² is
when kitty stops using the litterbox. The truth is, and this may be
hard to believe; the behavior is normal. In fact, itıs logical, looked
at from your catıs point of view.

Why would he suddenly refuse to go in his litterbox? For starters, it
may be a medical problem, such as lower urinary tract disease (common
among cats, especially males). The irritated bladder may cause him to
feel as if itıs more full than it actually is, and heıll need to void
right then and there. If the litterbox is on the other side of the
house, he doesnıt have time to reach it. He may even associate the pain
he feels upon urination with the litterbox itself.

Another normal reason a cat may choose to eliminate outside of his box
is if itıs just too darn dirty, or if it contains an unfamiliar kind of
litter. A cat is a creature of habit, and abrupt changes are met with
suspicion.

A cat who sprays can cause an owner unlimited frustration but, once
again, the behavior is normal. A cat is a territorial animal and
spraying is, bar none, the definitive calling card. A cat reaching
sexual maturity will often spray (this can be remedied with neutering),
and a cat perceiving a territorial threat may spray. If your neutered
cat has begun spraying, there may be a cat outside, or perhaps youıve
added another pet to your family. Usually the spraying is the result of
something different * and perceived as a territorial threat * in the
home. Looking at it from your catıs point of view can usually help you
find the cause and eliminate it, modify it or gingerly desensitize your
cat to its presence. For a territorial animal, spraying is a perfectly
reasonable, assertive but relatively unaggressive reaction to a
threatening situation.

Scratch a Cat, Find a Feline

What about scratching the furniture? Do you feel as if your cat is bent
on total household destruction? No, heıs not systematically demolishing
your furniture * heıs being a normal cat. Felines have a need and
several reasons to scratch: for claw conditioning, for muscle
stretching, as an emotional outlet and for territorial security. Once
again, the speciesı territorial side needs expression and scratching
leaves a visual mark (much to your dismay) and a scent mark (through
glands in the paw pads). The reason heıs using your sofa instead of his
scratching post is probably because the post isnıt sturdy enough or the
right texture. In the wild, a cat uses a tree or a fence for
scratching.

Understanding Aggression

A common aggressive behavior that owners find perplexing is called
redirected aggression. An example of this might be how your cat
suddenly lashes out at you when you innocently pet him while heıs
looking out the window.

Your reaction to this seemingly unprovoked aggression is that the cat
has, for not reason, turned mean. The simple truth is, he might have
seen a strange cat outside and was already in a very agitated state
when you suddenly startled him. The overreaction on his part was merely
the result of the threat he was feeling from the presence of a cat in
his domain. This doesnıt mean that you now have an aggressive cat. In
most cases, heıll calm down in a few hours and be back to his old self.
Sometimes it takes blocking access to that window until he forgets
about the cat outside.

Moonlight Madness

Cats are nocturnal hunters, so it makes perfect sense for your kitty to
prowl around after dark. If the nightly noise gets to be too much, try
playing with him right before bed in order to work off some of his
energy and satisfy his hunting desire.

Cats display lots of funny, quirky, confusing, annoying, serious and
even dangerous behavior that often leave owners scratching their head
in wonder. Donıt assume your cat is weird. Find the cause of the
behavior, whether itıs physical, medical, emotional or environmental,
and youıll find it makes sense in a strange, feline way.

Excerpts taken from article "Is Your Cat Crazy" by Pam Johnson Bennett
in 1998 Special Issue of Pet Let Magazine

Toni
June 9th 06, 01:49 PM
You sure do enjoy copying and forwarding material, Kiran.
<g>



-Toni

Kiran
June 9th 06, 02:50 PM
Toni > wrote:

: You sure do enjoy copying and forwarding material, Kiran.

I don't do it too often but ran into some interesting articles I felt
like sharing. Of course, I realize not everything will appeal to
everyone.

Eyra Humpentestikular
June 9th 06, 06:39 PM
"Kiran" > wrote in message

>
> Toni > wrote:
>
> > You sure do enjoy copying and forwarding material, Kiran.
> >
>
> I don't do it too often but ran into some interesting articles I felt like
> sharing. Of course, I realize not everything will appeal to everyone.
>

Don't worry about it. These ****wads will swallow *anything*. Even **** from
people who buy "a little toothbrush for my cat".

Kiran
June 9th 06, 06:56 PM
Eyra Humpentestikular > wrote:

: Don't worry about it. These ****wads will swallow *anything*.
: Even **** from people who buy "a little toothbrush for my cat".

Good sarcasm but I am not sure what you are trying to say. Toothbrushes
for cats are sold, and after some trial and error my cat and I have
adjusted to the weekly routine. Is it a good idea worth the trouble?
For us yes, but everybody has to decide for themselves. It is a very
small investment to try and see if it works for you.

Dan Espen
June 9th 06, 07:10 PM
Kiran > writes:

> Eyra Humpentestikular > wrote:
>
> : Don't worry about it. These ****wads will swallow *anything*.
> : Even **** from people who buy "a little toothbrush for my cat".
>
> Good sarcasm but I am not sure what you are trying to say. Toothbrushes
> for cats are sold, and after some trial and error my cat and I have
> adjusted to the weekly routine. Is it a good idea worth the trouble?
> For us yes, but everybody has to decide for themselves. It is a very
> small investment to try and see if it works for you.

Personally, I wouldn't traumatize our cat that way.

If you managed to get your cat to accept the procedure,
I'm duly impressed.

cybercat
June 9th 06, 09:00 PM
"Dan Espen" > wrote in message
...
> Kiran > writes:
>
> > Eyra Humpentestikular > wrote:
> >
> > : Don't worry about it. These ****wads will swallow *anything*.
> > : Even **** from people who buy "a little toothbrush for my cat".
> >
> > Good sarcasm but I am not sure what you are trying to say. Toothbrushes
> > for cats are sold, and after some trial and error my cat and I have
> > adjusted to the weekly routine. Is it a good idea worth the trouble?
> > For us yes, but everybody has to decide for themselves. It is a very
> > small investment to try and see if it works for you.
>
> Personally, I wouldn't traumatize our cat that way.
>
> If you managed to get your cat to accept the procedure,
> I'm duly impressed.

They make chicken flavored toothpaste! It works with enzymes so it is not
like your really have to scrub. One of my girls loves it, the other
tolerates it for long enough for me to get enough on her teeth. I can tell a
difference in their breath, lol



Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

Kiran
June 10th 06, 06:18 PM
Dan Espen > wrote:

: Personally, I wouldn't traumatize our cat that way.

Why? Would you take them to the Vet, adminiter medicines and injections
if their health needed that? Brushing teeth is picnic by comparison.

: If you managed to get your cat to accept the procedure,
: I'm duly impressed.

Took some getting used to but I wouldn't say it was a big deal.
Somewhere between combing and Vet visits, much less traumatic than the
latter!

How do you think I or my kids enjoy our hospital visits and procedures?
In the end, I ealize that some things are good for us and for those we
love even if somewhat stressful. Compared to what else we all put up
with for our health, brushing teeth is not even a blip on the radar.

jc
June 20th 06, 03:51 AM
I gave away a cat from a litter of three. Plus my black cat. 6 mos old,
neutered, now his wife says she wants to declaw him . I am very angry,
poor guy is now gonna be crippled so he can live with her declawed older
femme.

jc
June 20th 06, 03:57 AM
not my black cat. hes all mine. I gave away a 5 month male orange tabby.
kept his two bros., plus my black cat.
anyway, I told them not to declaw!

Kiran
June 20th 06, 06:38 AM
jc > wrote:

: not my black cat. hes all mine. I gave away a 5 month male orange tabby.
: kept his two bros., plus my black cat.
: anyway, I told them not to declaw!

Good, you must insist that they cannot declaw "your" cat and if
necessary you will find another home for him. Also, gently try to
educate them about evils of declawing, there is so much info on the
web.

Fred G. Mackey
April 3rd 07, 04:50 AM
Kiran wrote:
> http://pets.yahoo.com/pets/cats/bt/is_your_cat_crazy
>
> Is Your Cat Crazy?
>

Does the Pope wear a big hat?

> As a feline behaviorist, I get countless calls from owners claiming
> that their cats arenıt normal.

"Crazy" is normal for cats.

>
> Scratch a Cat, Find a Feline
>
> What about scratching the furniture? Do you feel as if your cat is bent
> on total household destruction? No, heıs not systematically demolishing
> your furniture * heıs being a normal cat. Felines have a need and
> several reasons to scratch: for claw conditioning, for muscle
> stretching, as an emotional outlet and for territorial security. Once
> again, the speciesı territorial side needs expression and scratching
> leaves a visual mark (much to your dismay) and a scent mark (through
> glands in the paw pads). The reason heıs using your sofa instead of his
> scratching post is probably because the post isnıt sturdy enough or the
> right texture.

Makes sense - flimsy scratching posts may cost less money, but they suck
when it comes to fulfilling the need to scratch.

If your catch knocks the post over scratching, it's probably too flimsy.


> In the wild, a cat uses a tree or a fence for
> scratching.
>

and sometimes a human leg.

> Understanding Aggression
>
> A common aggressive behavior that owners find perplexing is called
> redirected aggression. An example of this might be how your cat
> suddenly lashes out at you when you innocently pet him while heıs
> looking out the window.
>

Mine never does that - perhaps she's crazy.

OTOH, she sometimes decides that she must attack my feet and ankles.

> Moonlight Madness
>
> Cats are nocturnal hunters, so it makes perfect sense for your kitty to
> prowl around after dark. If the nightly noise gets to be too much, try
> playing with him right before bed in order to work off some of his
> energy and satisfy his hunting desire.

She's fine when I go to sleep - usually, the problem lies when she
awakes before me in the morning and decides that it is her goal in life
to knock everything off the desk that she can possibly knock off, making
lots of noise in the process.

>
> Cats display lots of funny, quirky, confusing, annoying, serious and
> even dangerous behavior that often leave owners scratching their head
> in wonder.

I don't even wonder.

> Donıt assume your cat is weird.

No need to assume - if it's a cat, it's weird. Not that there's
anything wrong with that.

> Find the cause of the
> behavior, whether itıs physical, medical, emotional or environmental,
> and youıll find it makes sense in a strange, feline way.
>

Sort of like abruptly running around the house like a.......well, a cat
for no apparent reason at all. Yep - that makes sense in a strange,
feline way.

> Excerpts taken from article "Is Your Cat Crazy" by Pam Johnson Bennett
> in 1998 Special Issue of Pet Let Magazine