PDA

View Full Version : Prednisolone for cats - can I fill a prescription in a pharmacy?


June 10th 06, 08:32 AM
According to this article:

http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/prednisone-prednisolone/page1.aspx


"This drug is registered for use in humans and animals.

Human formulations: Prelone® (Muro), Key-Pred® (Hyrex), Predalone®
(Forest), Predcor® (Hauck), Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn) and various generic
preparations

Veterinary formulations: Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn), Prednis-Tab® (Vet-A-
Mix), Meticorten® (Schering), Solu-Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn), Sterisol®
(Anthony), Cortisate-20® (Anthony) and various generic preparations"



Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of whether
it's for a human or an animal.

silvercelt
June 10th 06, 09:26 PM
should stick to animal one but depending on where you live your vet can
give you prescription for some products, check if that is one of them.


wrote:
> According to this article:
>
> http://www.petplace.com/drug-library/prednisone-prednisolone/page1.aspx
>
>
> "This drug is registered for use in humans and animals.
>
> Human formulations: Prelone® (Muro), Key-Pred® (Hyrex), Predalone®
> (Forest), Predcor® (Hauck), Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn) and various generic
> preparations
>
> Veterinary formulations: Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn), Prednis-Tab® (Vet-A-
> Mix), Meticorten® (Schering), Solu-Delta-Cortef® (Upjohn), Sterisol®
> (Anthony), Cortisate-20® (Anthony) and various generic preparations"
>
>
>
> Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
> formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of whether
> it's for a human or an animal.

Candace
June 11th 06, 01:43 AM
wrote:

> Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
> formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of whether
> it's for a human or an animal.

I would say yes. I think the main reason vets want you to buy meds
from them is so they can get the mark up. I've had vets give me
scripts when they didn't have the particular drug needed in stock. And
I have often gotten liquid antibiotics intended for human children from
the drugstore pharmacy for my cats. The vet probably won't want to
write the script if he has it in stock and they all have prednisolone
in stock.

Candace

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
June 11th 06, 07:26 PM
Candace wrote:

> wrote:
>
>
>>Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
>>formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of whether
>>it's for a human or an animal.
>
>
> I would say yes. I think the main reason vets want you to buy meds
> from them is so they can get the mark up. I've had vets give me
> scripts when they didn't have the particular drug needed in stock. And
> I have often gotten liquid antibiotics intended for human children from
> the drugstore pharmacy for my cats. The vet probably won't want to
> write the script if he has it in stock and they all have prednisolone
> in stock.

A friend's dog required a daily thyroid tablet, and she had
a prescription from a regular pharmacy. (Although the
pharmacist may have wondered about a human named "Rascal
Parker").

Howard C. Berkowitz
June 12th 06, 06:28 AM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Candace wrote:
>
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
> >>formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of
whether
> >>it's for a human or an animal.
> >
> >
> > I would say yes. I think the main reason vets want you to buy meds
> > from them is so they can get the mark up. I've had vets give me
> > scripts when they didn't have the particular drug needed in stock. And
> > I have often gotten liquid antibiotics intended for human children from
> > the drugstore pharmacy for my cats. The vet probably won't want to
> > write the script if he has it in stock and they all have prednisolone
> > in stock.
>
> A friend's dog required a daily thyroid tablet, and she had
> a prescription from a regular pharmacy. (Although the
> pharmacist may have wondered about a human named "Rascal
> Parker").
>

It varies by state, but some state pharmacy rules dictate variously that a
prescription for a cat will have a middle initial of C or F, or actually
spell out the species.

Oral corticosteroids should be therapeutically equivalent in cats and
humans, with the appropriate dose adjustments -- although cats seem to be
able to take what would be huge doses referenced to body weight.
Antibiotics also generally seem compatible.

I would be cautious in anything that affects the nervous system. Opioids,
for example, generally don't stop pain in cats and may cause wild
excitation. Still, certain drigs are usable in the controlled context of an
operating room.

June 15th 06, 07:49 AM
"Candace" > wrote in
ups.com:

> wrote:
>
>> Does the human formulation of Prednisolone really differ from the vet
>> formula? I thought that 5mg of a drug is the same regardless of
>> whether it's for a human or an animal.
>
> I would say yes. I think the main reason vets want you to buy meds
> from them is so they can get the mark up.


The vet probably won't want
> to write the script if he has it in stock and they all have
> prednisolone in stock.
>
> Candace
>
>

So true! I find it hard to believe that they don't want you to save the
precious money that could go to tests and treatments in the future.

June 15th 06, 07:53 AM
"Howard C. Berkowitz" > wrote in
:


>
> It varies by state, but some state pharmacy rules dictate variously
> that a prescription for a cat will have a middle initial of C or F, or
> actually spell out the species.
>
> Oral corticosteroids should be therapeutically equivalent in cats and
> humans, with the appropriate dose adjustments -- although cats seem to
> be able to take what would be huge doses referenced to body weight.
> Antibiotics also generally seem compatible.
>
> I would be cautious in anything that affects the nervous system.
> Opioids, for example, generally don't stop pain in cats and may cause
> wild excitation. Still, certain drigs are usable in the controlled
> context of an operating room.
>
>

I spoke to my vet who said that I shouldn't worry about the generic
Prednisolone at the pharmacy as long as it's Prednisolone and not
Prednisone. Sure enough, they had to order the Prednisolone.
The only difference I can visually see is the the pill from the vet was
rectangle and white, and this generic one is round and light orange. Both
are 5mg, and the difference in cost is substantial. The vet had quite a
markup. I see that even medi-vet.com only charges about .10˘ a pill.

Howard C. Berkowitz
June 15th 06, 09:29 PM
> wrote in message
...
> "Howard C. Berkowitz" > wrote in
> :
>
>
> >
> > It varies by state, but some state pharmacy rules dictate variously
> > that a prescription for a cat will have a middle initial of C or F, or
> > actually spell out the species.
> >
> > Oral corticosteroids should be therapeutically equivalent in cats and
> > humans, with the appropriate dose adjustments -- although cats seem to
> > be able to take what would be huge doses referenced to body weight.
> > Antibiotics also generally seem compatible.
> >
> > I would be cautious in anything that affects the nervous system.
> > Opioids, for example, generally don't stop pain in cats and may cause
> > wild excitation. Still, certain drigs are usable in the controlled
> > context of an operating room.
> >
> >
>
> I spoke to my vet who said that I shouldn't worry about the generic
> Prednisolone at the pharmacy as long as it's Prednisolone and not
> Prednisone. Sure enough, they had to order the Prednisolone.
> The only difference I can visually see is the the pill from the vet was
> rectangle and white, and this generic one is round and light orange. Both
> are 5mg, and the difference in cost is substantial. The vet had quite a
> markup. I see that even medi-vet.com only charges about .10˘ a pill.
>

Of the two, prednisolone is the active drug. Prednisone has to be converted,
by the liver, into prednisolone, so prednisolone becomes available more
quickly, and liver disease doesn't interfere with the conversion. The
dosages are roughly equivalent; both are less potent than some of the
synthetics. Potency really isn't an issue when giving them orally or by
injection into general tissue, because you can give a larger amount with
little problem. In general, the most potent corticosteroids are reserved
for cases where it's only possible to get a certain amount physically into
the area, such as in skin creams, joint injections, eyedrops, etc.