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June 15th 06, 11:10 PM
We've just adopted two beautiful kittens and want to keep them indoor
only.

However, we already have a cat that comes in and out as she pleases.
We have a Staywell door but while that keeps neighborhood critters out
of the house, it does not restrict indoor critters from going out.

Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
kittens are barred from exiting.

Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
cat and indoor one -- that's just not an option.

And for fun, check out www.the-sign.us/cats/ -- the new boys are on
display.

Thanks

Ivor Jones
June 16th 06, 02:31 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com
> We've just adopted two beautiful kittens and want to keep
> them indoor only.
>
> However, we already have a cat that comes in and out as
> she pleases. We have a Staywell door but while that keeps
> neighborhood critters out of the house, it does not
> restrict indoor critters from going out.
>
> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different
> key/collars) can be set up so that the cat with the
> collar can go in/out but the kittens are barred from
> exiting.
>
> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest
> making the outdoor cat and indoor one -- that's just not
> an option.
>
> And for fun, check out www.the-sign.us/cats/ -- the new
> boys are on display.

Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to restrict cats to an
indoor life IMHO, except for exceptional situations such as if the cat is
FIV+.

Ivor

Professor
June 16th 06, 03:22 AM
"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
>
> > wrote in message
> oups.com
>> We've just adopted two beautiful kittens and want to keep
>> them indoor only.
>>
>> However, we already have a cat that comes in and out as
>> she pleases. We have a Staywell door but while that keeps
>> neighborhood critters out of the house, it does not
>> restrict indoor critters from going out.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different
>> key/collars) can be set up so that the cat with the
>> collar can go in/out but the kittens are barred from
>> exiting.
>>
>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest
>> making the outdoor cat and indoor one -- that's just not
>> an option.
>>
>> And for fun, check out www.the-sign.us/cats/ -- the new
>> boys are on display.
>
> Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to restrict cats to an
> indoor life IMHO, except for exceptional situations such as if the cat is
> FIV+.
>
> Ivor

I couldn't disagree more. A lot of things can happen to your cat outdoors,
mostly bad. If you've ever had to endure the sudden loss of a loved cat you
might think differently. If a cat has never been let outdoors, they don't
know what it is like and so don't miss it.

oldhickory
June 16th 06, 05:13 AM
We eventually converted an indoor/outdoor cat to indoor only when we pledged
to keep new adoptee in.

It worked very well and we now have an all indoor household, except for when
we go out with them and keep them tightly sealed in the back yard (tall
vinyl privacy fence that they can not scale or leap over. (the bottom is
completely sealed)

They are MUCH safer in (or out with supervision or short bursts on their
own) as we live in an area that is adjacent to greenbelts etc. which are
probably home to predators.

It can be done. They still whine once or twice a day to go out but are very
safe now when they do!

"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> > wrote in message
>> oups.com
>>> We've just adopted two beautiful kittens and want to keep
>>> them indoor only.
>>>
>>> However, we already have a cat that comes in and out as
>>> she pleases. We have a Staywell door but while that keeps
>>> neighborhood critters out of the house, it does not
>>> restrict indoor critters from going out.
>>>
>>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different
>>> key/collars) can be set up so that the cat with the
>>> collar can go in/out but the kittens are barred from
>>> exiting.
>>>
>>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest
>>> making the outdoor cat and indoor one -- that's just not
>>> an option.
>>>
>>> And for fun, check out www.the-sign.us/cats/ -- the new
>>> boys are on display.
>>
>> Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to restrict cats to an
>> indoor life IMHO, except for exceptional situations such as if the cat is
>> FIV+.
>>
>> Ivor
>
> I couldn't disagree more. A lot of things can happen to your cat
> outdoors, mostly bad. If you've ever had to endure the sudden loss of a
> loved cat you might think differently. If a cat has never been let
> outdoors, they don't know what it is like and so don't miss it.
>

Erik
June 16th 06, 10:10 AM
there exists special doors with a magnetic belt so for the belted cat, the
door will open, but the unbelted will be staying before without making the
door to open... better ask this question again in the pet-shop, they know
more (and in better english...)

Erik

> schreef in bericht
oups.com...
> We've just adopted two beautiful kittens and want to keep them indoor
> only.
>
> However, we already have a cat that comes in and out as she pleases.
> We have a Staywell door but while that keeps neighborhood critters out
> of the house, it does not restrict indoor critters from going out.
>
> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
> can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
> kittens are barred from exiting.
>
> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
> cat and indoor one -- that's just not an option.
>
> And for fun, check out www.the-sign.us/cats/ -- the new boys are on
> display.
>
> Thanks
>

Ivor Jones
June 16th 06, 11:34 AM
"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
> ...

[snip]

> > Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to
> > restrict cats to an indoor life IMHO, except for
> > exceptional situations such as if the cat is FIV+.
>
> I couldn't disagree more. A lot of things can happen to
> your cat outdoors, mostly bad. If you've ever had to
> endure the sudden loss of a loved cat you might think
> differently. If a cat has never been let outdoors, they
> don't know what it is like and so don't miss it.

Doesn't make it any the less cruel. We've had cats for 30+ years, all have
been outdoor cats and nothing has ever happened to any of them. And yes, I
have had one die suddenly on me, so I know exactly what it was like. Yes,
he did die while outdoors, he was found lying on a neighbour's driveway,
but it was a natural death (according to the vet, anyway).

Ivor

Professor
June 16th 06, 02:08 PM
"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Professor" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> "Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
>> ...
>
> [snip]
>
>> > Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to
>> > restrict cats to an indoor life IMHO, except for
>> > exceptional situations such as if the cat is FIV+.
>>
>> I couldn't disagree more. A lot of things can happen to
>> your cat outdoors, mostly bad. If you've ever had to
>> endure the sudden loss of a loved cat you might think
>> differently. If a cat has never been let outdoors, they
>> don't know what it is like and so don't miss it.
>
> Doesn't make it any the less cruel. We've had cats for 30+ years, all have
> been outdoor cats and nothing has ever happened to any of them. And yes, I
> have had one die suddenly on me, so I know exactly what it was like. Yes,
> he did die while outdoors, he was found lying on a neighbour's driveway,
> but it was a natural death (according to the vet, anyway).
>
> Ivor

Young cats extremely rarely die suddenly of natural causes. An autopsy
would have determined just why, but you were probably too cheap to pay for
one. Letting your cats out to be run over in city traffic isn't cruel, but
keeping cats inside their whole lives where they are safe is cruel?
Fortunately uninformed older people that think like you are dying off.

Ivor Jones
June 16th 06, 04:02 PM
"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

[snip]

> Young cats extremely rarely die suddenly of natural
> causes. An autopsy would have determined just why, but
> you were probably too cheap to pay for one. Letting your
> cats out to be run over in city traffic isn't cruel, but
> keeping cats inside their whole lives where they are safe
> is cruel? Fortunately uninformed older people that think
> like you are dying off.

You didn't read what I wrote. Did I say my cat who died outside was
young..? In actual fact he was 18+ at the time and used to roam for quite
a distance. Incidentally, I probably spend more money at the vet in a
month than you do in a year, so don't presume.

Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping them indoors
permanently is cruel. The area around here is relatively safe, we live in
a road with little traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end) and all
our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly fine.

Incidentally, are you in the USA..? It seems to be the US that is becoming
so fanatical about keeping cats indoors, all I can say is if you live
where you don't think it is ok to let cats out then don't have them. If
you genuinely love cats and want to do something positive for them, go and
volunteer at a rescue shelter as I do.

Ivor

Professor
June 16th 06, 06:49 PM
"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
> "Professor" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Young cats extremely rarely die suddenly of natural
>> causes. An autopsy would have determined just why, but
>> you were probably too cheap to pay for one. Letting your
>> cats out to be run over in city traffic isn't cruel, but
>> keeping cats inside their whole lives where they are safe
>> is cruel? Fortunately uninformed older people that think
>> like you are dying off.
>
> You didn't read what I wrote. Did I say my cat who died outside was
> young..? In actual fact he was 18+ at the time and used to roam for quite
> a distance. Incidentally, I probably spend more money at the vet in a
> month than you do in a year, so don't presume.
>
> Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping them indoors
> permanently is cruel. The area around here is relatively safe, we live in
> a road with little traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end) and all
> our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly fine.
>
> Incidentally, are you in the USA..? It seems to be the US that is becoming
> so fanatical about keeping cats indoors, all I can say is if you live
> where you don't think it is ok to let cats out then don't have them. If
> you genuinely love cats and want to do something positive for them, go and
> volunteer at a rescue shelter as I do.
>
> Ivor

I encourage you to go to a cat show and tell the breeders they are cruel to
keep indoors their cats worth thousands of dollars. You're likely to get
your ass kicked. BTW I adopted a cat from a shelter in my youth and I kept
him indoors his whole life. When you do find one of your cats run over
don't come crying to us.

~*Connie*~
June 16th 06, 10:20 PM
> Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping them indoors
> permanently is cruel. The area around here is relatively safe, we live in
> a road with little traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end) and all
> our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly fine.
>

Cats are "naturally" outdoor creatures, sure, I'll give you that. But so
were humans. Why aren't you living outside and why are you wearing
clothes???
Cats are naturally desert creatures.. so why are you keeping them in your
residential area?
Cats are naturally strict carnivores.. so why are you feeding them food
loaded down with carbohydrates?


Look.. Cats adapt perfectly fine to living strictly indoors. I have six
cats, and they are VERY happy. Occasionally a door is left open, and most
of the time they don't even go outside, and if they do it is simply to
satisfy their curiosity, not to 'escape' into their "natural" world.. If I
were being "permanently cruel" to them, I wouldn't have the close loving
relationship that I have with them - which I am sure is a heck of a lot
closer than you have with yours who are often gone.

And just because YOU have had extremely good luck keeping cats that go
outside, does NOT mean that every cat should go outside. A cat that lives
an indoor/outdoor existence has a life expectancy of 3 to 5 years.. as
opposed to the 16-20 for the indoor cat. (and don't tout that your cats
lived long lives.. this is the life expectancy, not a absolute. Some cats
go out and die the next day)

as to the OP, I'd recommend switching to a strictly indoor situation as
well, but once cats have expanded their territory to include the outside,
SOME cats have a very hard time adapting to the smaller territory. In that
case, you have to weigh a possibly shorter life span vs quality of life.

There is no devise that Im aware of (and I did research for my own cats - I
need to give one of mine access to a room that no one else can get into) and
the keyed door is the only option, and they only go one way. What you could
do is build a tunnel. Put one keyed door on one side, and another on the
other - facing the other way.

Ivor Jones
June 17th 06, 01:59 AM
"Upscale" > wrote in message


[snip]

> Your unspoken insinuation that any owner is selfish for
> owning a cat where it isn't allowed to go out is
> short-sighted and very obviously misguided.

No it's not. Cats are outdoor animals. You are the selfish one for keeping
them prisoner.

Ivor

Ivor Jones
June 17th 06, 02:02 AM
"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

[snip]

> I encourage you to go to a cat show and tell the breeders
> they are cruel to keep indoors their cats worth thousands
> of dollars. You're likely to get your ass kicked. BTW I
> adopted a cat from a shelter in my youth and I kept him
> indoors his whole life. When you do find one of your
> cats run over don't come crying to us.

That's another cruelty, breeding cats purely for show. There are thousands
upon thousands of unwanted cats in shelters worldwide, people should adopt
one of those and not breed yet more.

BTW I don't have an ass, horse or any other equine animal, what's that got
to do with it..? Even if I did why would anybody want to kick it..?

Ivor

Ivor Jones
June 17th 06, 02:08 AM
"~*Connie*~" > wrote in message

> > Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping
> > them indoors permanently is cruel. The area around here
> > is relatively safe, we live in a road with little
> > traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end) and all
> > our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly
> > fine.
>
> Cats are "naturally" outdoor creatures, sure, I'll give
> you that. But so were humans. Why aren't you living
> outside and why are you wearing clothes???

Because I live in the UK and it's bloody freezing..!

> Cats are naturally desert creatures.. so why are you
> keeping them in your residential area?

Hmm, that's a new one, source of information, please..? I don't doubt you,
but I've never heard that one before.

> Cats are naturally strict carnivores.. so why are you
> feeding them food loaded down with carbohydrates?

How do you know what I'm feeding them..?

> Look.. Cats adapt perfectly fine to living strictly
> indoors. I have six cats, and they are VERY happy. Occasionally a door
> is left open, and most of the time
> they don't even go outside, and if they do it is simply
> to satisfy their curiosity, not to 'escape' into their
> "natural" world.. If I were being "permanently cruel" to
> them, I wouldn't have the close loving relationship that
> I have with them - which I am sure is a heck of a lot
> closer than you have with yours who are often gone.

You do not know me, my cats or the relationship I have with them, do not
presume. I love my cats far more than any human, I promise you.

> And just because YOU have had extremely good luck keeping
> cats that go outside, does NOT mean that every cat should
> go outside. A cat that lives an indoor/outdoor existence
> has a life expectancy of 3 to 5 years.. as opposed to the
> 16-20 for the indoor cat. (and don't tout that your cats
> lived long lives.. this is the life expectancy, not a
> absolute. Some cats go out and die the next day)

Source of your figures, please..? Are you speaking for the UK or are you
one of those people who think the world ceases at US borders..? I know
people in city centres who have had outdoor cats for long periods, a
friend's cat recently died (of natural causes) at age 19, she had been an
outdoor cat her whole life, on a *very* busy road.

Ivor

Running Free
June 17th 06, 08:27 AM
"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > "Professor" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
>
> > > Young cats extremely rarely die suddenly of natural
> > > causes. An autopsy would have determined just why, but
> > > you were probably too cheap to pay for one. Letting your
> > > cats out to be run over in city traffic isn't cruel, but
> > > keeping cats inside their whole lives where they are safe
> > > is cruel? Fortunately uninformed older people that think
> > > like you are dying off.
> > >
>
> > You didn't read what I wrote. Did I say my cat who died outside
> > was young..? In actual fact he was 18+ at the time and used to
> > roam for quite a distance. Incidentally, I probably spend more money
> > at the vet in a month than you do in a year, so don't presume.
> > Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping them indoors
> > permanently is cruel. The area around here is relatively safe, we live
> > in a road with little traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end)
> > and all our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly fine.
> > Incidentally, are you in the USA..? It seems to be the US that is
> > becoming so fanatical about keeping cats indoors, all I can say is if
> > you live where you don't think it is ok to let cats out then don't have
> > them. If you genuinely love cats and want to do something positive
> > for them, go and volunteer at a rescue shelter as I do.
> > Ivor
> >
>
> I encourage you to go to a cat show and tell the breeders they
> are cruel to keep indoors their cats worth thousands of dollars.
>
They *are* cruel. These people who breed cats for show hate animals, and
lead lives totally devoted to profit and transient, meaningless
peer-pressure. They should all be locked up in mental institutions and
lobotomized.
>
> You're likely to get your ass kicked.
>
There's nothing they hate more than being told they're profiteers and animal
haters. However, they're unlikely to kick anyone's ass, as most of them are
so fat they can't lift their legs high enough.
>
> BTW I adopted a cat from a shelter in my
> youth and I kept him indoors his whole life.
>
That is DISGUSTING. You should be ashamed of yourself. In fact, I've a good
mind to report you to a variety of animal-cruelty and Police authorities,
you utter creep. Hang your head in shame, for keeping an animal indoors "his
whole life". Appalling.

Running Free
June 17th 06, 08:49 AM
"~*Connie*~" > justified itself in message

>
> > Cats are naturally outdoor creatures, so yes keeping them indoors
> > permanently is cruel. The area around here is relatively safe, we live
> > in a road with little traffic (no through traffic as it's a dead end)
> > and all our cats for the last 30 years have been perfectly fine.
> >
>
> Cats are "naturally" outdoor creatures, sure, I'll give you that.
> But so were humans. Why aren't you living outside and why
> are you wearing clothes???
>
What a ridiculous, whining retort! You could then argue that humans are
inherently vicious hunters, and should hunt, kill, and eat cats, because
it's the "natural way". Don't be stupid, you useless, cruel cow.
>
> Cats are naturally desert creatures.. so why are you keeping
> them in your residential area?
>
If they're "naturally desert creatures", then why are you keeping them
locked-up in your house, you disgusting ****? You should be stopped - by
force, if necessary - from keeping cats.
>
> Cats are naturally strict carnivores.. so why are you feeding
> them food loaded down with carbohydrates?
>
And YOU don't?! Don't be a hypocrite, ****head!
>
> Look.. Cats adapt perfectly fine to living strictly indoors.
>
No they're not. They're screaming, inside. Stop trying to justify your
laziness and cruelty.
>
> I have six cats, and they are VERY happy.
>
They're NOT happy. They're miserable, being kept prisoner in such miserable
circumstances. You need your head examined, you cruel *******.
>
> Occasionally a door is left open, and most
> of the time they don't even go outside,
>
That's because they're terrified. A state of mind which YOU have created. Be
ashamed, bitch.
>
> and if they do it is simply to satisfy their
> curiosity, not to 'escape' into their "natural" world..
>
Poor things. How they must hate you.
>
> If I were being "permanently cruel" to them, I wouldn't have the close
> loving relationship that I have with them - which I am sure is a heck
> of a lot closer than you have with yours who are often gone.
>
You wish. Admit it. You're a nasty, horrible person. And cruel.
>
> And just because YOU have had extremely good luck keeping cats
> that go outside, does NOT mean that every cat should go outside.
> A cat that lives an indoor/outdoor existence has a life expectancy of
> 3 to 5 years.. as opposed to the 16-20 for the indoor cat. (and don't
> tout that your cats lived long lives.. this is the life expectancy, not a
> absolute. Some cats go out and die the next day)
>
While YOUR cats are dying inside, and they take years to do it. Disgusting.
>
> as to the OP, I'd recommend switching to a strictly indoor situation as
> well, but once cats have expanded their territory to include the outside,
> SOME cats have a very hard time adapting to the smaller territory. In
> that case, you have to weigh a possibly shorter life span vs quality of
life.
>
Jesus. What a terrible thing to say. In fact, it makes you sound insane. And
sexually frustrated.
>
> There is no devise that Im aware of (and I did research for my own cats -
> I need to give one of mine access to a room that no one else can get
> into) and the keyed door is the only option, and they only go one way.
> What you could do is build a tunnel. Put one keyed door on one side,
> and another on the other - facing the other way.
>
It's people like you that staff concentration camps. I'm reporting you to
all the animal welfare groups I can find.

tsr3
June 18th 06, 03:30 AM
Ivor Jones wrote:
> "Upscale" > wrote in message
>
>
> [snip]
>
> > Your unspoken insinuation that any owner is selfish for
> > owning a cat where it isn't allowed to go out is
> > short-sighted and very obviously misguided.
>
> No it's not. Cats are outdoor animals. You are the selfish one for keeping
> them prisoner.
>
> Ivor

No, Ivor, I do not agree.

We adopted 3 cats (2 were facing euthanasia). We keep 2 inside, and
they are very happy--are not interested in going into the great
outdoors.

Anyone who can give a cat a good, loving home, whether indoor or
outdoor, is ok in my book.

Stop being so judgemental.

David Chang
June 18th 06, 04:22 AM
Keep this in mind:

Outdoor cats have an average life expectancy of 4 years
Indoor cats have an average life expectancy of 15 years

Having said that: Why not make your current indoor/outdoor cat an indoor cat
only and get rid of the cat door completely? I don't think there's currently
a door on the market that has "selective animal exiting".

June 18th 06, 09:06 AM
David Chang wrote:
> Keep this in mind:
>
> Outdoor cats have an average life expectancy of 4 years
> Indoor cats have an average life expectancy of 15 years
>
> Having said that: Why not make your current indoor/outdoor cat an indoor cat
> only and get rid of the cat door completely? I don't think there's currently
> a door on the market that has "selective animal exiting".

While I think, for practical reasons, it is safer and easier to keep a
cat indoors, there is a valid argument that from a cat's point of view,
this is not a great situation. (FWIW, my cat is an indoor cat. She isnt
street smart.)

To persuade an indoor/outdoor cat to stay in is hard on the cat.

If a cat never knew different, then of course a cat can be happy
indoors. Our cat is thoroughly contented as long as there's company.

But cats I had years ago who were indoor/outdoor lived very different
lives and I personally think of higher quality. They would not have
chosen to stay indoors all the time.

Its like a person who spends their whole life in one village. Someone
who has wandered around the world might consider it limiting, but there
are millions of perfectly happy people who do it.

DB

Ivor Jones
June 18th 06, 04:06 PM
"tsr3" > wrote in message
ups.com

[snip]

> No, Ivor, I do not agree.

It's your right to disagree. It's my right to say you're wrong.

> We adopted 3 cats (2 were facing euthanasia). We keep 2
> inside, and they are very happy--are not interested in
> going into the great outdoors.
>
> Anyone who can give a cat a good, loving home, whether
> indoor or outdoor, is ok in my book.
>
> Stop being so judgemental.

Better an indoor home than none at all, I agree, but it is still
fundamentally wrong in my book and I've had cats for 30+ years and worked
at a rescue shelter for 4 so I think I know a little about cats and what's
best for them.

Not everyone lives in the backwoods of the USA where predators are lurking
around every corner.

Ivor

June 18th 06, 06:38 PM
Ivor Jones wrote:
> Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to restrict cats to an
> indoor life IMHO, except for exceptional situations such as if the cat is
> FIV+.

Hey, thanks, Ivor, for completely derailling the thread, so instead of
answering my question about a cat door, you moved it into a flamefest
regarding indoor v. outdoor cats -- which is best?

And did the rest of you HAVE to take the bait and keep it going? Aren't
there like a bazillion discussions on that topic? And does anyone's
mind get changed? NO !!

Okay back to my original request:

>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
>> can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
>> kittens are barred from exiting.
>>
>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
>> cat an indoor one -- that's just not an option.

Erik, I appreciated that you were the only to stay on topic, but I
already have the kind of door you suggested. I need something a little
more sophisticated.

Any flaming of me will be ignored -- honestly, I am just looking for
some answers, not to get pulled into any kind of debate.

Thanks

Matthew
June 18th 06, 06:46 PM
Morgan they do have a computerized version of the door with a electronic
signal key that you attaches to the cat's collar they use it mostly for
dogs but it is small enough to work on cats if I find the info I will post
it but most modern petstores should have it but it cost around $200 or more

There is a guy who designed a photo door admittance his cats kept bring
their kills inside so he developed a system that would recognize a outline
of the cat minus the kill in the cat's mouth


> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Ivor Jones wrote:
>> Why not just let the new cats out..? It's cruel to restrict cats to an
>> indoor life IMHO, except for exceptional situations such as if the cat is
>> FIV+.
>
> Hey, thanks, Ivor, for completely derailling the thread, so instead of
> answering my question about a cat door, you moved it into a flamefest
> regarding indoor v. outdoor cats -- which is best?
>
> And did the rest of you HAVE to take the bait and keep it going? Aren't
> there like a bazillion discussions on that topic? And does anyone's
> mind get changed? NO !!
>
> Okay back to my original request:
>
>>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
>>> can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
>>> kittens are barred from exiting.
>>>
>>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
>>> cat an indoor one -- that's just not an option.
>
> Erik, I appreciated that you were the only to stay on topic, but I
> already have the kind of door you suggested. I need something a little
> more sophisticated.
>
> Any flaming of me will be ignored -- honestly, I am just looking for
> some answers, not to get pulled into any kind of debate.
>
> Thanks
>

Morgan
June 18th 06, 11:14 PM
David Chang wrote:
> Keep this in mind:
>
> Outdoor cats have an average life expectancy of 4 years
> Indoor cats have an average life expectancy of 15 years

David, I don't want to have this thread veer off again to
indoor/outdoor cat -- which is best. As I wrote in my original email:

>>Please don't suggest making the outdoor cat an indoor one -- that's just not an option.

While you may disagree with my choice, please respect it. All I am
looking for is a door that not only prevents unwanted animals from
coming IN, but will also prevent certain animals from going out.

Ivor Jones
June 19th 06, 12:16 AM
"Morgan" > wrote in message
oups.com
> David Chang wrote:
> > Keep this in mind:
> >
> > Outdoor cats have an average life expectancy of 4 years
> > Indoor cats have an average life expectancy of 15 years

Not around here.

> David, I don't want to have this thread veer off again to
> indoor/outdoor cat -- which is best. As I wrote in my
> original email:
>
> > > Please don't suggest making the outdoor cat an indoor
> > > one -- that's just not an option.
>
> While you may disagree with my choice, please respect it.

I cannot respect that which is fundamentally opposed to my core beliefs. I
accept it is your decision, but I do not and never will believe that it is
your decision to make.

Make of that (and me) what you will, I will make no further comments.


Ivor

cybercat
June 19th 06, 01:39 AM
"Morgan" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> David Chang wrote:
> > Keep this in mind:
> >
> > Outdoor cats have an average life expectancy of 4 years
> > Indoor cats have an average life expectancy of 15 years
>
> David, I don't want to have this thread veer off again to
> indoor/outdoor cat -- which is best. As I wrote in my original email:
>
> >>Please don't suggest making the outdoor cat an indoor one -- that's just
not an option.
>
> While you may disagree with my choice, please respect it. All I am
> looking for is a door that not only prevents unwanted animals from
> coming IN, but will also prevent certain animals from going out.
>

Most people here really love cats. How can you expect any of us to
respect a choice you make that endangers your cats? Your request
is unreasonable, and your decision to endanger you cat very sad.



Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

Morgan
June 19th 06, 04:01 AM
Ivor -- you write over 300 posts a months -- you don't have any "core
beliefs", you just can't SHUT UP, apparently. I thought the
rec.music.guitar folks were annoying, but it seems as Ivor and
logorrhetic ilk are determined to hog every newsgroup conversation.

I found what I was looking for -- now everyone jump back in and fight
tooth and nail whether 'tis better to have indoor cats or not. Thanks
for reminding me why newsgroups have become so irrelevant. Ooh, now
let's talk about whether kitties should be fixed or not !!

(so out of here)

Ollie Clark
June 19th 06, 05:03 PM
wrote:
>
>>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
>>> can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
>>> kittens are barred from exiting.
>>>
>>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
>>> cat an indoor one -- that's just not an option.
>
> Erik, I appreciated that you were the only to stay on topic, but I
> already have the kind of door you suggested. I need something a little
> more sophisticated.

Have a look at the Staywell 500 series of cat doors. They appear to have a
unique coded collar key. I can't beleive noone's made a catflap which read
the identichips. I had a look into making one myself a while back but it was
going to end up costing about 150 GBP so I gave up in the end.

Dan Espen
June 19th 06, 05:27 PM
Ollie Clark > writes:

> wrote:
>>
>>>> Does anyone know of a door that (perhaps with different key/collars)
>>>> can be set up so that the cat with the collar can go in/out but the
>>>> kittens are barred from exiting.
>>>>
>>>> Or any other kind of strategy? Please don't suggest making the outdoor
>>>> cat an indoor one -- that's just not an option.
>>
>> Erik, I appreciated that you were the only to stay on topic, but I
>> already have the kind of door you suggested. I need something a little
>> more sophisticated.
>
> Have a look at the Staywell 500 series of cat doors. They appear to have a
> unique coded collar key. I can't beleive noone's made a catflap which read
> the identichips. I had a look into making one myself a while back but it was
> going to end up costing about 150 GBP so I gave up in the end.

It seems to me a cat is clever enough to figure out how to go thru
a cat door at the same time another cat is going thru if it really
wants to get out.

On the issue of it being cruel to the cat,
well, there's cruelty to cats, and then there's cruelty
to the birds, chipmunks, and other wildlife in the
area.

June 19th 06, 07:59 PM
Given an indoor cat on average live 4 times longer, do you or should
you try to have old age cats? It would be like you living to 300. Do
you really want to live that long even if you could afford it?

Matthew
June 19th 06, 10:56 PM
IMO I would
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Given an indoor cat on average live 4 times longer, do you or should
> you try to have old age cats? It would be like you living to 300. Do
> you really want to live that long even if you could afford it?
>