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June 17th 06, 03:39 PM
Hi,

I've got some questions about this treatment; we have a cat that we
would really like to have this done on (he can't take tapazole, he had
a serious bone marrow reaction to it; he is not VERY hyperthyroid at
this point, it was difficult to even detect, they had to run a free t4
by equilibrium dialysis test [beats me], but he had lost weight and
isn't gaining any back). The complicated factor is that my wife is
about to have a baby; one vet told us that he needs to stay 6 feet away
from anyone under the age of 16 for 3 weeks after. But I can't find
this stated anywhere else. The closest I've found is that for two week
you should be careful and limit the amount of time you spend touching
him.

Can anyone tell me if she is just being overcautious? One thing: we are
in California, so perhaps it is a state-regulated law.

thanks

Kitkat
June 17th 06, 04:34 PM
wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I've got some questions about this treatment; we have a cat that we
> would really like to have this done on (he can't take tapazole, he had
> a serious bone marrow reaction to it; he is not VERY hyperthyroid at
> this point, it was difficult to even detect, they had to run a free t4
> by equilibrium dialysis test [beats me], but he had lost weight and
> isn't gaining any back). The complicated factor is that my wife is
> about to have a baby; one vet told us that he needs to stay 6 feet away
> from anyone under the age of 16 for 3 weeks after. But I can't find
> this stated anywhere else. The closest I've found is that for two week
> you should be careful and limit the amount of time you spend touching
> him.
>
> Can anyone tell me if she is just being overcautious? One thing: we are
> in California, so perhaps it is a state-regulated law.
>
> thanks
>

I don't have experience with I-131 and cats, but I do have personal
experience with I-131. Look at it this way...your cat will be
radioactive until all of the iodine washes out of the system. You do NOT
want to put your newborn baby at risk of any radioactive contamination
as it can damage baby's thyroid! (yours too! but i'd be much more
concerned about a newborn!)

Last summer when I had I-131 treatment, I stayed away from my cats for a
little over a week and did not sleep next to my husband for 5 nites.
However, I was told to stay away from kids, the elderly, and
pregnant/nursing moms for at LEAST 2 weeks and I went a little longer
just to be super safe.

I would think in the case of your newborn baby, being overcautious is a
GOOD idea. :)
good luck!!!
Pam

June 17th 06, 04:42 PM
yes, exactly....I wish I could find somewhere to board him rather than
the hospital where it's being done, because that is going to run $3k,
plust the $1k for the treatment....no way can I afford that.

Kitkat wrote:
> wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > I've got some questions about this treatment; we have a cat that we
> > would really like to have this done on (he can't take tapazole, he had
> > a serious bone marrow reaction to it; he is not VERY hyperthyroid at
> > this point, it was difficult to even detect, they had to run a free t4
> > by equilibrium dialysis test [beats me], but he had lost weight and
> > isn't gaining any back). The complicated factor is that my wife is
> > about to have a baby; one vet told us that he needs to stay 6 feet away
> > from anyone under the age of 16 for 3 weeks after. But I can't find
> > this stated anywhere else. The closest I've found is that for two week
> > you should be careful and limit the amount of time you spend touching
> > him.
> >
> > Can anyone tell me if she is just being overcautious? One thing: we are
> > in California, so perhaps it is a state-regulated law.
> >
> > thanks
> >
>
> I don't have experience with I-131 and cats, but I do have personal
> experience with I-131. Look at it this way...your cat will be
> radioactive until all of the iodine washes out of the system. You do NOT
> want to put your newborn baby at risk of any radioactive contamination
> as it can damage baby's thyroid! (yours too! but i'd be much more
> concerned about a newborn!)
>
> Last summer when I had I-131 treatment, I stayed away from my cats for a
> little over a week and did not sleep next to my husband for 5 nites.
> However, I was told to stay away from kids, the elderly, and
> pregnant/nursing moms for at LEAST 2 weeks and I went a little longer
> just to be super safe.
>
> I would think in the case of your newborn baby, being overcautious is a
> GOOD idea. :)
> good luck!!!
> Pam

Kitkat
June 18th 06, 12:10 AM
wrote:
> yes, exactly....I wish I could find somewhere to board him rather than
> the hospital where it's being done, because that is going to run $3k,
> plust the $1k for the treatment....no way can I afford that.

Understandable. Do you have a basement where kitty could spend his
isolation? Maybe another family member that could help in the meanwhile?
Ironically, I am having a test next week to see if I need another round
of I-131. It's no fun! Best of luck to you all!
Pam

CatNipped
June 18th 06, 12:39 AM
"Kitkat" > wrote in message
. com...
> wrote:
>> yes, exactly....I wish I could find somewhere to board him rather than
>> the hospital where it's being done, because that is going to run $3k,
>> plust the $1k for the treatment....no way can I afford that.
>
> Understandable. Do you have a basement where kitty could spend his
> isolation? Maybe another family member that could help in the meanwhile?
> Ironically, I am having a test next week to see if I need another round of
> I-131. It's no fun! Best of luck to you all!
> Pam

I've never had to deal with this problem, but I thought it was the law that
the vet had to keep the cat in isolation after treatment and dispose of its
wastes as "hazardous materials".

--

Hugs,

CatNipped

See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/

Kitkat
June 18th 06, 02:00 AM
CatNipped wrote:
> "Kitkat" > wrote in message
> . com...
>
wrote:
>>
>>>yes, exactly....I wish I could find somewhere to board him rather than
>>>the hospital where it's being done, because that is going to run $3k,
>>>plust the $1k for the treatment....no way can I afford that.
>>
>>Understandable. Do you have a basement where kitty could spend his
>>isolation? Maybe another family member that could help in the meanwhile?
>>Ironically, I am having a test next week to see if I need another round of
>>I-131. It's no fun! Best of luck to you all!
>>Pam
>
>
> I've never had to deal with this problem, but I thought it was the law that
> the vet had to keep the cat in isolation after treatment and dispose of its
> wastes as "hazardous materials".
>

I am sure the law varies. At least it does from state to state with
humans and I-131.

Phil P.
June 18th 06, 08:41 AM
> wrote in message
ps.com...
> Hi,
>
> I've got some questions about this treatment; we have a cat that we
> would really like to have this done on (he can't take tapazole, he had
> a serious bone marrow reaction to it; he is not VERY hyperthyroid at
> this point, it was difficult to even detect, they had to run a free t4
> by equilibrium dialysis test [beats me], but he had lost weight and
> isn't gaining any back). The complicated factor is that my wife is
> about to have a baby; one vet told us that he needs to stay 6 feet away
> from anyone under the age of 16 for 3 weeks after. But I can't find
> this stated anywhere else. The closest I've found is that for two week
> you should be careful and limit the amount of time you spend touching
> him.
>
> Can anyone tell me if she is just being overcautious?

Definitely-- but she has to cover herself because of NRC regulations.
People over 45 are told to stay 3 feet or farther away from the cat except
for short periods for feeding and routine care. People under 45 are told
stay 6 feet or farther away from the cat, and children under 18 and pregnant
women are told to have no contact with the cat for 2-3 weeks. I received
the same spiel when my cat had the I-131 tx last month. I was forced into
the treatment, too, because the Tapazole completely killed my cat's appetite
and drove her WBC count down to borderline leukopenia.

Personally, I think the regulation is a tad extreme. Its based on the
assumption that all cats will receive a large dose. The cat can't be
released until his surface radioactivity level below is 45 mR/hr- that's
about the same or less than a routine x-ray. I do agree with not allowing
your wife to handle the cat or clean the litterboxes for a couple of weeks.

A lot of radioiodine facilities use a standard high dose that will destroy
cancerous thyroid if the cat has any. But only about 2% of feline thyroid
tumors are cancerous. So, I strongly suggest you speak to the vet who will
be administering the tx about the dose. My cat's dose was about 1/2 or even
a little less than the routine dose and her 3-week post treatment T4 was .5!
That's *below* the normal range. She was released 2 days after treatment
because her radioactivity level was far below the 45 mR/hr requirement. The
lower the dose the faster the cat clears the I-131.

I-131 is one of few drugs that's not dosed according to body weight, but
rather severity of hyperthyroidism. If your cat's pretreatment T4 levels
aren't very high after he's been off Tapazole for about 10 days, a low dose
would probably be appropriate. Also, the lower the dose the less chance of
the cat becoming hypothyroid or developing CRF. Most cats that receive
I-131 tx will become hypothyroid for 1-3 months after tx because it takes
awhile for the normal thyroid tissue to become active again. The
hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue suppresses the normal thyroid tissue so it
doesn't receive much TSH. Once the hyperfunctioning tissue is destroyed, the
normal tissue can start receiving TSH again and become functional again.

You might want to call a few veterinary universities and speak to an
endocrinologist and a radiologist. I recommend calling the Animal Medical
Center in NYC.

Best of luck,

Phil