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ggg
June 21st 06, 01:04 PM
Hallo,

a few days after paying a deposit for 2 Begal Kittens, I found the
following:

> They are confused as to whether they are wild or domestic and
> typically have horrible medical problems. The most common in Bengals
> (it is more common to have it than not) is irritable bowel disease,
> which means a life of projectile diarrhea.
http://www.bigcatrescue.org/bengal_cats.htm

Is this true? Does anyone have experience with this?

Thank You!

Charlie Wilkes
June 21st 06, 04:19 PM
On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 14:04:50 +0200, "ggg"
> wrote:

>Hallo,
>
>a few days after paying a deposit for 2 Begal Kittens, I found the
>following:
>
>> They are confused as to whether they are wild or domestic and
>> typically have horrible medical problems. The most common in Bengals
>> (it is more common to have it than not) is irritable bowel disease,
>> which means a life of projectile diarrhea.
>http://www.bigcatrescue.org/bengal_cats.htm
>
>Is this true? Does anyone have experience with this?
>
>Thank You!
>
>
YES. If you're not sure what you're doing, walk away. Somebody
posted a terrible experience in this group... got two bengal kittens
and they both developed paralysis after vaccinations. It was
heartbreaking to read. They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
environment, and so they are pets for serious hobbiests who know what
they are doing, not the average cat owner. They will also trash your
house. I wouldn't own one because I'm not qualified to care for it.

Go to the shelter and pick out two friendly cats and turn their lives
from bored anxiety and misery to bliss, and pat yourself on the back
for your wisdom.

Charlie

Gail
June 21st 06, 05:26 PM
Great advice, Charlie, especially in your recommendation to adopt shelter
kitties. They make the BEST pets.
Gail
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 14:04:50 +0200, "ggg"
> > wrote:
>
>>Hallo,
>>
>>a few days after paying a deposit for 2 Begal Kittens, I found the
>>following:
>>
>>> They are confused as to whether they are wild or domestic and
>>> typically have horrible medical problems. The most common in Bengals
>>> (it is more common to have it than not) is irritable bowel disease,
>>> which means a life of projectile diarrhea.
>>http://www.bigcatrescue.org/bengal_cats.htm
>>
>>Is this true? Does anyone have experience with this?
>>
>>Thank You!
>>
>>
> YES. If you're not sure what you're doing, walk away. Somebody
> posted a terrible experience in this group... got two bengal kittens
> and they both developed paralysis after vaccinations. It was
> heartbreaking to read. They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
> environment, and so they are pets for serious hobbiests who know what
> they are doing, not the average cat owner. They will also trash your
> house. I wouldn't own one because I'm not qualified to care for it.
>
> Go to the shelter and pick out two friendly cats and turn their lives
> from bored anxiety and misery to bliss, and pat yourself on the back
> for your wisdom.
>
> Charlie

Ollie via CatKB.com
June 21st 06, 06:08 PM
Both of my Bengals are delightful. The older one (Tigger 10) did have a bad
reaction to a vaccine once but it was a bad vaccine batch and affected other
cats (non Bengal) as well. That is the only medical problem we've had so far.


They are very active, not terribly cuddly but very affectionate.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200606/1

Ollie via CatKB.com
June 21st 06, 06:17 PM
I just checked that link and found it very misleading. It appears they are
talking about the first crosses of domestic cat with Asian lepoard cat.
These are called F1s and F2s. They are basically wild animals and do not
make suitable pets, especially the males. I believe in order for a cat to be
a registered Bengal it must be at least 4 generations out of the wild.
Reputable breeders will make every effort to breed out any aggressive
tendencies. Except for their coloring, my two look and act pretty much like
regular cats.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200606/1

ggg
June 21st 06, 07:40 PM
Hi,

> Go to the shelter and pick out two friendly cats and turn their
> lives from bored anxiety and misery to bliss, and pat yourself on
> the back for your wisdom.

Normally I would agree with you, however our last cats were from a
rescue organization. Due to faulty testing, we were assured that the
mother cat and all of her kittens were not infected with FIP, FeLV,
etc. We kept the mother and one of the kittens, the rest were given
homes by the rescue organization as soon as they were old enough. Six
months later the two cats we had kept, had to be put down only 5 days
apart. They both had FeLV.

I can not describe what it felt like loosing two young, wonderful,
beautiful, loving cats within a week.

Cats from a shelter will almost always have a higher infection rates,
than young cats who have been raised in an enviroment without a large
number of other cats.

This why we decided not risk getting cats from a shelter, and this is
why the thought that we might soon have two chronically ill cats so
distressing. I have not been able to find clear cut, trustworthy
information about IBD rates in Bengal cats.

BTW: Always ask your vet about the error ratios of the tests they are
running, and if the error ratio data has been backed up by recent
trials!


> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic

The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.

toby

cybercat
June 21st 06, 08:02 PM
"ggg" > wrote in message
...
> Hi,
>
> > Go to the shelter and pick out two friendly cats and turn their
> > lives from bored anxiety and misery to bliss, and pat yourself on
> > the back for your wisdom.
>
> Normally I would agree with you, however our last cats were from a
> rescue organization. Due to faulty testing, we were assured that the
> mother cat and all of her kittens were not infected with FIP, FeLV,
> etc. We kept the mother and one of the kittens, the rest were given
> homes by the rescue organization as soon as they were old enough. Six
> months later the two cats we had kept, had to be put down only 5 days
> apart. They both had FeLV.
>
> I can not describe what it felt like loosing two young, wonderful,
> beautiful, loving cats within a week.
>
> Cats from a shelter will almost always have a higher infection rates,
> than young cats who have been raised in an enviroment without a large
> number of other cats.
>

One bad experience made you decide to stop rescuing cats that need
homes, and to support breeders?

Ugh. I hope you show better judgment in other areas of life.

I have never had anything but rescues and have never had a problem.

My first one lived to be 20 years old.



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Charlie Wilkes
June 22nd 06, 07:34 AM
On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 20:40:29 +0200, "ggg"
> wrote:
>
>
>> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
>
>The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
>the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
>had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
>cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
>their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
>animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.

Sure, they are friendly. My point is about health issues, not
temperament.

I've expressed my opinion, but I'm hardly an expert. Good luck with
whatever you do.

Charlie

cybercat
June 22nd 06, 12:43 PM
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 20:40:29 +0200, "ggg"
> > wrote:
> >
> >
> >> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
> >
> >The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
> >the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
> >had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
> >cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
> >their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
> >animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.
>
> Sure, they are friendly. My point is about health issues, not
> temperament.
>
> I've expressed my opinion, but I'm hardly an expert. Good luck with
> whatever you do.
>

Well how highly evolved of you, Charlie. :)



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Charlie Wilkes
June 22nd 06, 01:21 PM
On 22 Jun 2006 13:43:02 +0200, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
>> On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 20:40:29 +0200, "ggg"
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> >> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
>> >
>> >The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
>> >the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
>> >had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
>> >cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
>> >their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
>> >animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.
>>
>> Sure, they are friendly. My point is about health issues, not
>> temperament.
>>
>> I've expressed my opinion, but I'm hardly an expert. Good luck with
>> whatever you do.
>>
>
>Well how highly evolved of you, Charlie. :)
>
I see pictures of Bengal cats in fashion magazines, curled around the
legs of the slinky models, and it does not make me want to acquire
one. I'm also familiar with stories of people who got them without
knowing what to expect, with disastrous results. I think you
remember the lady who posted about the bengal kittens who became
paralyzed after a vaccination. I remember her last post, where she
said something like, "We were looking forward to the joy of raising
happy kittens, and instead we brought suffering into their lives and
heartache into our own lives." It was a poignant statement.

On the other hand, there are happy Bengal cats with owners who love
them and enjoy them.

I do not think, however, that a Bengal cat can bring more joy into
anyone's life than does the little tabby who I found on the road,
half-starved, infested with parasites and bleeding from his eyeballs.

Charlie

cybercat
June 22nd 06, 01:36 PM
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On 22 Jun 2006 13:43:02 +0200, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 20:40:29 +0200, "ggg"
> >> > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
> >> >
> >> >The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
> >> >the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
> >> >had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
> >> >cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
> >> >their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
> >> >animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.
> >>
> >> Sure, they are friendly. My point is about health issues, not
> >> temperament.
> >>
> >> I've expressed my opinion, but I'm hardly an expert. Good luck with
> >> whatever you do.
> >>
> >
> >Well how highly evolved of you, Charlie. :)
> >
> I see pictures of Bengal cats in fashion magazines, curled around the
> legs of the slinky models, and it does not make me want to acquire
> one. I'm also familiar with stories of people who got them without
> knowing what to expect, with disastrous results. I think you
> remember the lady who posted about the bengal kittens who became
> paralyzed after a vaccination. I remember her last post, where she
> said something like, "We were looking forward to the joy of raising
> happy kittens, and instead we brought suffering into their lives and
> heartache into our own lives." It was a poignant statement.
>
> On the other hand, there are happy Bengal cats with owners who love
> them and enjoy them.
>
> I do not think, however, that a Bengal cat can bring more joy into
> anyone's life than does the little tabby who I found on the road,
> half-starved, infested with parasites and bleeding from his eyeballs.
>

Very nicely put. I do recall that sad vaccination story. I am thinking of
that moron's Bengal named Louis who keeps peeing all over everything, too.
You know, the one who got rid of the sweet Henry thinking that would
stop the aggressive Louis from peeing all over every thing, but it didn't?
It seems the main problem was the Bengal's aggressiveness and it was
never solved. So Henry is out of a home and Louis is still stinking the
place up.

You know me, Charlie, and how I feel about breeders given the cats
that are already here and already in need of homes. I cannot fathom
what would move anyone to support breeding except the most
shallow and insidious motives imaginable. See there? That is the
strong language often used by the unevolved. :)




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Toni
June 22nd 06, 05:07 PM
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
> I see pictures of Bengal cats in fashion magazines, curled around the
> legs of the slinky models, and it does not make me want to acquire
> one. I'm also familiar with stories of people who got them without
> knowing what to expect, with disastrous results. I think you
> remember the lady who posted about the bengal kittens who became
> paralyzed after a vaccination. I remember her last post, where she
> said something like, "We were looking forward to the joy of raising
> happy kittens, and instead we brought suffering into their lives and
> heartache into our own lives." It was a poignant statement.



There is also at least one case of a Bengal not being recognized as a
"domestic cat" and instead being classified as a wild animal regarding
rabies laws.
http://tinyurl.com/hv6j8

By law, if a domestic, vaccinated pet cat bites someone it is quarrantined
to screen for rabies. There is no similar approved vaccine for "wild
animals", and so a Bengal biting someone is treated as a wild animal-
euthanized and then tested for rabies.

The cat in this particular case was finally allowed to leave the state in a
settlement deal.

Bengal breeders need to get this situation addressed.

--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

Charlie Wilkes
June 22nd 06, 05:07 PM
On 22 Jun 2006 14:36:19 +0200, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
>> On 22 Jun 2006 13:43:02 +0200, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >> On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 20:40:29 +0200, "ggg"
>> >> > wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >
>> >> >> They are not fully acclimated to a domestic
>> >> >
>> >> >The Bengal cats, who I met at the family from whom we will be getting
>> >> >the kittens, were some of the friendliest cats I have ever known. They
>> >> >had no reservations about strangers and as soon as one sat, one had a
>> >> >cat on the lap. Obviously, cats who are only a few generations from
>> >> >their wild ancestors will not be like this. If these were F1 to F5
>> >> >animals, I would never consider keeping them as a pet.
>> >>
>> >> Sure, they are friendly. My point is about health issues, not
>> >> temperament.
>> >>
>> >> I've expressed my opinion, but I'm hardly an expert. Good luck with
>> >> whatever you do.
>> >>
>> >
>> >Well how highly evolved of you, Charlie. :)
>> >
>> I see pictures of Bengal cats in fashion magazines, curled around the
>> legs of the slinky models, and it does not make me want to acquire
>> one. I'm also familiar with stories of people who got them without
>> knowing what to expect, with disastrous results. I think you
>> remember the lady who posted about the bengal kittens who became
>> paralyzed after a vaccination. I remember her last post, where she
>> said something like, "We were looking forward to the joy of raising
>> happy kittens, and instead we brought suffering into their lives and
>> heartache into our own lives." It was a poignant statement.
>>
>> On the other hand, there are happy Bengal cats with owners who love
>> them and enjoy them.
>>
>> I do not think, however, that a Bengal cat can bring more joy into
>> anyone's life than does the little tabby who I found on the road,
>> half-starved, infested with parasites and bleeding from his eyeballs.
>>
>
>Very nicely put. I do recall that sad vaccination story. I am thinking of
>that moron's Bengal named Louis who keeps peeing all over everything, too.
>You know, the one who got rid of the sweet Henry thinking that would
>stop the aggressive Louis from peeing all over every thing, but it didn't?
>It seems the main problem was the Bengal's aggressiveness and it was
>never solved. So Henry is out of a home and Louis is still stinking the
>place up.
>
>You know me, Charlie, and how I feel about breeders given the cats
>that are already here and already in need of homes. I cannot fathom
>what would move anyone to support breeding except the most
>shallow and insidious motives imaginable. See there? That is the
>strong language often used by the unevolved. :)
>
I understand your thinking. Also, as a practical matter, I wouldn't
buy a cat any more than I would buy dandelion seeds.

A Bengal is a different sort of cat, however, and people want what
they want. To me, what really matters is that prospective owners of
Bengal cats research the subject and think critically about what they
are doing, and then (if they go forward at the expense of their
furniture and rugs) maintain the commitment they make to the animal,
even when problems arise.

As for Louis's owner, he is a well-meaning individual who seeks to do
right by the creatures that cross his path, such as his son's
girlfriend and the squirrel in his back yard. There are genuinely
villianous people in this world (Saddam Hussein) and there are
ordinary people who sometimes show poor judgment (his attorneys). Too
often, on Usenet as in real life, they are treated as moral equals
when they are not.

And I guess it is true that I have evolved, but my reference point is
myself rather than you or anyone else. As a relative newcomer to
Usenet, I surveyed the general nastiness and thought, "this is how the
game is played, and I wanna be as good as anyone." So, my goal was to
cause people to render their keyboards into shards of brittle plastic.
I got to be good enough to collect many wonderful death threats and
provide with a steady flow of reading material.

Nowadays, I need a more interesting and challenging goal. I have
tried to modify my approach to actually provoke thought, which
requires tact and a willingness to consider the perspective of the
person to whom I am addressing my comments. It also requires an
awareness that 9 out of 10 times, it won't accomplish anything,
whereas it's much easier to incite blind rage and then chuckle about
it.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.dogs.rescue/msg/d3be81fc4944efe0?hl=en&

That is the "old me," before I reformed. It still makes me chuckle,
though, especially when I think of the email I got from the poor guy.
He did not share my sense of humor.

Charlie