PDA

View Full Version : Long haired cats


Paula
June 27th 06, 03:59 PM
Can you advise me on a suitable brush for long haired cat

I have several types of brushes:
1. metal comb - This comb gets the best results, but the teeth aren't
wide enough. He runs away because I'm pulling too much.
2. Glove - He takes one look at this and runs a mile. If I'm lucky
enough to use it, but it doesn't tackle any of his knots
3. Rubber cat shape brush - My vet recommended this, but again, it
doesn't really deal with his coat very well. It removes loose hair but
thats all.

Wendy
June 27th 06, 05:50 PM
I have an undercoat rake that I think came from the dog department. The pins
are very thick and rounded on the ends so they don't scratch and are far
enough apart that it doesn't pull hair when it's used. It works pretty well
to break up the dense underfur. I had originally gotten it to comb my old
cat who had stopped grooming herself but found it worked well to break up
mats in the making on my long haired girl too.

W


"Paula" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Can you advise me on a suitable brush for long haired cat
>
> I have several types of brushes:
> 1. metal comb - This comb gets the best results, but the teeth aren't
> wide enough. He runs away because I'm pulling too much.
> 2. Glove - He takes one look at this and runs a mile. If I'm lucky
> enough to use it, but it doesn't tackle any of his knots
> 3. Rubber cat shape brush - My vet recommended this, but again, it
> doesn't really deal with his coat very well. It removes loose hair but
> thats all.
>

-L.
June 27th 06, 06:57 PM
Paula wrote:
> Can you advise me on a suitable brush for long haired cat
>
> I have several types of brushes:
> 1. metal comb - This comb gets the best results, but the teeth aren't
> wide enough. He runs away because I'm pulling too much.

They come in different tooth sizes - small, medium and large-toothed.
What I always recommend is the metal, medium-toothed, teflon-coated
comb. This is the #1 grooming tool for the long-haired cat. It gets
the undercoat out which is what causes matts. You have to start at the
back of the cat, lift some fur up and comb the hair that remains from
the base of the hair to the tip. Then let a bit more fur down, and
repeat. This way you are combing the layers of fur from the bottom,
toward the front of the cat. Does this make sense?



> 2. Glove - He takes one look at this and runs a mile. If I'm lucky
> enough to use it, but it doesn't tackle any of his knots
> 3. Rubber cat shape brush - My vet recommended this, but again, it
> doesn't really deal with his coat very well. It removes loose hair but
> thats all.

Those tools are really useless. Matts really need to be shaved out
unless they are very loose to begin with. Metal combs are the way to
go.

-L.
(former groomer)

keywords: matts mats fur long haired comb grooming

---MIKE---
June 27th 06, 07:51 PM
Tiger has some mats that need to be shaved out. He won't let me do
anything with them once they have formed. He is due to go to the vet on
July 10th.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

The Cat
June 29th 06, 12:29 AM
I agree, the metal comb works well for my domestic longhaired cat.
She'll usually let me brush her for a longer period of time if I do it
while she's eating (and distracted). That usually allows access to her
back and sides, which don't get as much self-grooming from her. The
comb I have is about the size of a bar of soap, if that helps. Good
luck!

Jon

My Lenaptalf: http://jon-maxson.ic-nso.com

June 30th 06, 02:42 AM
-L. wrote:

> -L.
> (former groomer)
>

Do you have any advice for a sheltie who hates to be brushed? She is a
rescued dog, and has always hated grooming. It's the only time that she
bites, and it is very stressful for both us to brush her. She is the
queen of undercoat.

I take her to a groomer, and they do a great job. They put an E-collar
on her the first time, to make sure she didn't bite them. She does
behave better for them, but she is probably scared stiff.

I'd like to brush her more at home, between professional grooming
sessions, but she gets stressed, and I have to wear heavy gloves to
protect my hands and still be extra careful.

The soft bristle brushes are acceptable to her, but don't take any hair
out. The larger brush doesn't seem to work as well. I have a small cat
slicker brush that takes out more hair, but it tends to pull.

She's okay with trimming the hair on her feet (it tickles a little, so
she'll pull her feet away, but she doesn't bite or act stressed). And
she's okay with getting her nails trimmed.

What kind of brush would you recommend? And do you have tricks for
helping a stressed dog relax?