PDA

View Full Version : Would you leave food out for raccoons?


Kiran
June 28th 06, 06:40 AM
I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
(one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
nights.

General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.

However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.

I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
(There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)

So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
when and where would you leave the food?

Ryan Robbins
June 28th 06, 06:51 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
>I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.

You most certainly SHOULD NOT feed raccoons or any other wild animal. They
will become dependent on you and end up starving to death, getting hit by
vehicles, or could spread rabies to neighborhood pets.

Upscale
June 28th 06, 06:51 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message news
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

Absolutely not. Believe me when I tell you that you'd be opening yourself,
your family, your pets and your property up to a world of difficulty.
Racoons can forage their own food quite well without your feeding them or
encouraging them in any way to hang around.

I've got to tell you Kiran, it's quite obvious that you're a compassionate
animal person, but just the fact that you're considering feeding a family of
wild racoons borders on the insane.

-L.
June 28th 06, 07:24 AM
Kiran wrote:
> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

Not in an urban or suburban setting. If you lived in the country, I'd
say yes. They're simply too close to people, which isn't a good thing
for anything wild.

-L.

Kiran
June 28th 06, 08:18 AM
Kiran > wrote:

OK, Ryan, Upscale, L - I get the idea...

I am soft by heart. As a child growing up in a small town in India I
used to leave some food on the roof for monkeys! Today I feed cats,
birds, squirrels, and sea gulls when I can walk to the water. I once
convinced my next-door neighbor who insisted on feeding her cat cheap
kibble, to let me feed her canned food once a day.

In this case, I was softened up after reading the following sory (very
touching to me):

http://parsifal.membrane.com/alex/higginsjournal1.html

(this is part 1 of 8, but you can skim through quite fast)

But I can see it probably was a nutty idea in my urban setting.

It is just that the baby coons looked and acted so much like the cats I
love. It broke my heart to see them desperately sniffing for food from
yard to yard, while all of us and my cat had not only eaten but left
food on the plate and I had just thrown it in the trash bag which I
closed tightly as well as the trash bin so they wouldn't know it was
there. Something seemed not right.

But I am small, the world is big, and even if it is not right I can't
always set everything right.

So I have chosen to feed microbes, whom I cannot trick or stop, instead
of baby raccoons, whom I can...

Thank you all and good night.

-L.
June 28th 06, 08:26 AM
Kiran wrote:
> Kiran > wrote:
>
> OK, Ryan, Upscale, L - I get the idea...
>
> I am soft by heart. As a child growing up in a small town in India I
> used to leave some food on the roof for monkeys! Today I feed cats,
> birds, squirrels, and sea gulls when I can walk to the water. I once
> convinced my next-door neighbor who insisted on feeding her cat cheap
> kibble, to let me feed her canned food once a day.
>
> In this case, I was softened up after reading the following sory (very
> touching to me):
>
> http://parsifal.membrane.com/alex/higginsjournal1.html
>
> (this is part 1 of 8, but you can skim through quite fast)
>
> But I can see it probably was a nutty idea in my urban setting.
>
> It is just that the baby coons looked and acted so much like the cats I
> love. It broke my heart to see them desperately sniffing for food from
> yard to yard, while all of us and my cat had not only eaten but left
> food on the plate and I had just thrown it in the trash bag which I
> closed tightly as well as the trash bin so they wouldn't know it was
> there. Something seemed not right.
>
> But I am small, the world is big, and even if it is not right I can't
> always set everything right.
>
> So I have chosen to feed microbes, whom I cannot trick or stop, instead
> of baby raccoons, whom I can...
>
> Thank you all and good night.

Dude, you are talking to the biggest heart and sap when it comes to
animals of any sort! I had a baby raccoon as a pet growing up - they
are the cutest animals on Earth, I swear! But feeding them in an urban
setting gets them used to human food and used to humans, which isn't
good. Best to leave it up to nature to supply them with their meals.
Good luck to you,
-L.

Toni
June 28th 06, 11:11 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?




In many municipalities it is illegal to feed raccoons- Miami-Dade has a
terrible problem with them. They turn into determined pests and are health
risks.



--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

kraut
June 28th 06, 01:33 PM
>>I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
>> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
>> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
>> nights.
>>
>> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
>> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
>> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>>
>> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
>> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
>> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
>> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
>You most certainly SHOULD NOT feed raccoons or any other wild animal. They
>will become dependent on you and end up starving to death, getting hit by
>vehicles, or could spread rabies to neighborhood pets.


On one of the Animal Cops show on Animal Planet a while back there was
a segment about people that started feeding raccoons and before long
their property was over run with them. They finally had to get
someone to come in and trap them to remove them and relocate the ones
that were in good health to a more remote area so they could go back
to living life as raccoons should!!!

Anwser is: NO!!!!!!!!!!!

22brix
June 28th 06, 03:25 PM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
>I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

Kiran,
In addition to rabies, raccoons can also carry raccoon roundworms
(Baylisascaris procyonis). They pass the eggs in their feces and it has
been fatal in several children. It can damage the brain.
http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-27261--,00.html

The raccoons are also a pain in the rear once they start knocking over your
garbage cans in the middle of the night!! I love 'em, but not when my 55 lb
dog is sitting on my chest in the middle of the night barking her head off
at them!

Bonnie

Matthew
June 28th 06, 03:42 PM
In Florida raccoons are the biggest carriers of the rabies virus we are
always have outbreak alerts

Alison
June 28th 06, 04:15 PM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
> Kiran > wrote:
>
> OK, Ryan, Upscale, L - I get the idea...
>
> I am soft by heart. As a child growing up in a small town in India I
> used to leave some food on the roof for monkeys! Today I feed cats,
> birds, squirrels, and sea gulls when I can walk to the water. I once
> convinced my next-door neighbor who insisted on feeding her cat cheap
> kibble, to let me feed her canned food once a day.
>
> In this case, I was softened up after reading the following sory (very
> touching to me):
>
> http://parsifal.membrane.com/alex/higginsjournal1.html
>
> (this is part 1 of 8, but you can skim through quite fast)
>
> But I can see it probably was a nutty idea in my urban setting.
>
> It is just that the baby coons looked and acted so much like the cats I
> love. It broke my heart to see them desperately sniffing for food from
> yard to yard, while all of us and my cat had not only eaten but left
> food on the plate and I had just thrown it in the trash bag which I
> closed tightly as well as the trash bin so they wouldn't know it was
> there. Something seemed not right.
>
> But I am small, the world is big, and even if it is not right I can't
> always set everything right.
>
> So I have chosen to feed microbes, whom I cannot trick or stop, instead
> of baby raccoons, whom I can...
>
> Thank you all and good night.|>>>

I understand how you feel, I would be truly tempted to do the same. I love
racoons but we don't have wild ones over here.
But as everyone else has said, its not a good idea in the long term for
them or for you.
I saw a wildlife programme about racoons and it was interesting that urban
racoons are smaller and more wily than country ones. If they are trapped
and released in the country many do not adapt and don't survive :(
Alison

studio
June 28th 06, 09:36 PM
Kiran wrote:
> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

The answer is absolutely not.

We have raccoons where I live also. We used to leave food out for the
cats
until the raccoons started eating it all at night. Now we only leave
cat food out
during the daytime.....never at night.
The raccoon's were starting to get more agressive, in that they started
coming
during the day. But the bluebird's started dive-bombing them! So they
don't show
up any more during the day.
Besides raccoon's, we also have skunk's who like to eat cat food.
Unlike the raccoon's, no one messes with the skunk's.....not people,
not cat's not
dog's, not even the bluebird's. The skunk's just walk around the
property as if
they didn't have a care in the world. It's kinda' scary though when
it's dark out
and you think one of the local cat's are coming up to you.....but it's
a skunk!
Skunk's have poor eyesight, especially at night, so they don't really
see you.....
and you defintely don't want to spook a skunk.
Also besides all the other things that previous posters have mentioned,
cat food
is not good for raccoon's or skunk's anyway.

Adam Helberg
June 29th 06, 12:40 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message ...
>I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

Raccoons are quite adapted to foraging for their own food and it's usually
recommended not to feed them.

Adam

Magic Mood Jeep©
June 29th 06, 01:28 AM
studio wrote:
> Kiran wrote:
>> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of
>> raccoons (one adult and five children). They have been spotted
>> sniffing around our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this
>> summer, mostly late nights.
>>
>> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If
>> so, when and where would you leave the food?
>
> The answer is absolutely not.
>
> We have raccoons where I live also. We used to leave food out for the
> cats
> until the raccoons started eating it all at night. Now we only leave
> cat food out
> during the daytime.....never at night.
> The raccoon's were starting to get more agressive, in that they
> started coming
> during the day. But the bluebird's started dive-bombing them! So they
> don't show
> up any more during the day.
> Besides raccoon's, we also have skunk's who like to eat cat food.
> Unlike the raccoon's, no one messes with the skunk's.....not people,
> not cat's not
> dog's, not even the bluebird's. The skunk's just walk around the
> property as if
> they didn't have a care in the world. It's kinda' scary though when
> it's dark out
> and you think one of the local cat's are coming up to you.....but it's
> a skunk!
> Skunk's have poor eyesight, especially at night, so they don't really
> see you.....
> and you defintely don't want to spook a skunk.
> Also besides all the other things that previous posters have
> mentioned, cat food
> is not good for raccoon's or skunk's anyway.

Looks like it's time for you to get a Great Horned Owl for your
neighborhood. One of their favorite foods is skunk, and they have no sense
of smell!!!!

Cheryl
June 29th 06, 02:14 AM
On Wed 28 Jun 2006 10:25:48a, 22brix wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
):

> Kiran,
> In addition to rabies, raccoons can also carry raccoon
> roundworms (Baylisascaris procyonis). They pass the eggs in
> their feces and it has been fatal in several children. It can
> damage the brain.
> http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-27261-
> -,00.html
>
> The raccoons are also a pain in the rear once they start
> knocking over your garbage cans in the middle of the night!! I
> love 'em, but not when my 55 lb dog is sitting on my chest in
> the middle of the night barking her head off at them!
>
> Bonnie

And in addition to rabies and worms, there's FPLV and CPV-2 to
worry about, and other mutations of the parvovirus. Keep the 'coons
away.


--
Cheryl

RobZip
June 29th 06, 10:18 AM
"Magic Mood Jeep©" > wrote in message
m...
> Looks like it's time for you to get a Great Horned Owl for your
> neighborhood. One of their favorite foods is skunk, and they have no
> sense of smell!!!!
Oh that sounds promising.. !!! One near miss from an owl attack and the
skunk unloads on your property while the owl gets away oblivious to what
it's done.

Barb P
June 29th 06, 01:59 PM
Someone mentioned cat food not good for raccoons. We had the coon problem a
year ago. They got into our attic thru the chimney. We had hired the
wildlife control man to trap them (and set them free far into the country).
He baited them with catfood! Also, had possums...no skunks yet..thank
goodness! I no longer leave food out at night for the stray cats. If they
dont come by dark to eat, then they have to wait til morning.

--
Where will you spend eternity? In the Smoking or Non-Smoking Section?
"Magic Mood Jeep©" > wrote in message
m...
> studio wrote:
>> Kiran wrote:
>>> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of
>>> raccoons (one adult and five children). They have been spotted
>>> sniffing around our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this
>>> summer, mostly late nights.
>>>
>>> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If
>>> so, when and where would you leave the food?
>>
>> The answer is absolutely not.
>>
>> We have raccoons where I live also. We used to leave food out for the
>> cats
>> until the raccoons started eating it all at night. Now we only leave
>> cat food out
>> during the daytime.....never at night.
>> The raccoon's were starting to get more agressive, in that they
>> started coming
>> during the day. But the bluebird's started dive-bombing them! So they
>> don't show
>> up any more during the day.
>> Besides raccoon's, we also have skunk's who like to eat cat food.
>> Unlike the raccoon's, no one messes with the skunk's.....not people,
>> not cat's not
>> dog's, not even the bluebird's. The skunk's just walk around the
>> property as if
>> they didn't have a care in the world. It's kinda' scary though when
>> it's dark out
>> and you think one of the local cat's are coming up to you.....but it's
>> a skunk!
>> Skunk's have poor eyesight, especially at night, so they don't really
>> see you.....
>> and you defintely don't want to spook a skunk.
>> Also besides all the other things that previous posters have
>> mentioned, cat food
>> is not good for raccoon's or skunk's anyway.
>
> Looks like it's time for you to get a Great Horned Owl for your
> neighborhood. One of their favorite foods is skunk, and they have no
> sense of smell!!!!
>

cybercat
June 29th 06, 05:23 PM
"RobZip" <no > wrote in message
...
>
> "Magic Mood Jeep©" > wrote in message
> m...
> > Looks like it's time for you to get a Great Horned Owl for your
> > neighborhood. One of their favorite foods is skunk, and they have no
> > sense of smell!!!!
> Oh that sounds promising.. !!! One near miss from an owl attack and the
> skunk unloads on your property while the owl gets away oblivious to what
> it's done.
>
>

Just blow the skunk away, Rob, like you really want to do.



Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

studio
June 29th 06, 06:21 PM
Barb P wrote:
> Someone mentioned cat food not good for raccoons. We had the coon problem a
> year ago. They got into our attic thru the chimney. We had hired the
> wildlife control man to trap them (and set them free far into the country).
> He baited them with catfood! Also, had possums...no skunks yet..thank
> goodness! I no longer leave food out at night for the stray cats. If they
> dont come by dark to eat, then they have to wait til morning.
>
> >> studio wrote:
> >> Also besides all the other things that previous posters have
> >> mentioned, cat food
> >> is not good for raccoon's or skunk's anyway.

Yes Barb, raccoon's absolutely love cat food, but it's not good for
them
if they eat it on a daily basis, and especially not good if it's their
main diet.
It's like baiting a kid with a twinkie. But if the kid eat's nothing
but Twinkies,
the kid won't have a long life.

RobZip
June 29th 06, 08:20 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "RobZip" <no > wrote in message
> ...

>> Oh that sounds promising.. !!! One near miss from an owl attack and the
>> skunk unloads on your property while the owl gets away oblivious to what
>> it's done.

> Just blow the skunk away, Rob, like you really want to do.

Sure thing sweetie.... Just walk across that patio and hold still when the
little red light comes on, mmmkay?

cybercat
June 29th 06, 09:55 PM
"RobZip" <no > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "RobZip" <no > wrote in message
> > ...
>
> >> Oh that sounds promising.. !!! One near miss from an owl attack and the
> >> skunk unloads on your property while the owl gets away oblivious to
what
> >> it's done.
>
> > Just blow the skunk away, Rob, like you really want to do.
>
> Sure thing sweetie.... Just walk across that patio and hold still when the
> little red light comes on, mmmkay?
>
>

hahaha! Not bad. Not bad at all. :)



Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php

RobZip
June 30th 06, 12:57 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "RobZip" <no > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "cybercat" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> >
>> > "RobZip" <no > wrote in message
>> > ...
>>
>> >> Oh that sounds promising.. !!! One near miss from an owl attack and
>> >> the
>> >> skunk unloads on your property while the owl gets away oblivious to
> what
>> >> it's done.
>>
>> > Just blow the skunk away, Rob, like you really want to do.
>>
>> Sure thing sweetie.... Just walk across that patio and hold still when
>> the
>> little red light comes on, mmmkay?
>>
>>
>
> hahaha! Not bad. Not bad at all. :)
>

I was hoping that you could see more humor (as intended) than venom in the
reply.

Barb P
June 30th 06, 01:54 AM
--
Where will you spend eternity? In the Smoking or Non-Smoking Section?
"studio" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Barb P wrote:
>> Someone mentioned cat food not good for raccoons. We had the coon problem
>> a
>> year ago. They got into our attic thru the chimney. We had hired the
>> wildlife control man to trap them (and set them free far into the
>> country).
>> He baited them with catfood! Also, had possums...no skunks yet..thank
>> goodness! I no longer leave food out at night for the stray cats. If they
>> dont come by dark to eat, then they have to wait til morning.
>>
>> >> studio wrote:
>> >> Also besides all the other things that previous posters have
>> >> mentioned, cat food
>> >> is not good for raccoon's or skunk's anyway.
>
> Yes Barb, raccoon's absolutely love cat food, but it's not good for
> them
> if they eat it on a daily basis, and especially not good if it's their
> main diet.
> It's like baiting a kid with a twinkie. But if the kid eat's nothing
> but Twinkies,
> the kid won't have a long life.

Yes, and just like kids, they dont know that either ;-)
>

Terry
June 30th 06, 05:00 PM
Kiran, you have seen to many Disney movies.

Lee Hirt
July 26th 06, 05:57 PM
On 27 Jun 2006 23:24:40 -0700, "-L." > wrote:

>
>Kiran wrote:
>> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
>> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
>> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
>> nights.
>>
>> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
>> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
>> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>>
>> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
>> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
>> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
>> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>>
>> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
>> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
>> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>>
>> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
>> when and where would you leave the food?
>
>Not in an urban or suburban setting. If you lived in the country, I'd
>say yes. They're simply too close to people, which isn't a good thing
>for anything wild.

I know this is an old post, but I simply had to respond. NEVER, EVER
feed raccoons regardless whether the setting urban or country! I know
they are cute, but they are also a major pest when they become
attached to your property. With their little hands they can open just
about anything they set their minds to. I heard more than one story
about people coming home to find a family of raccoons have moved in.

In addition they can be very vicious, develop a territorial attitude
which may lead to home invasion, and can carry rabies.

But just as important, when you feed a wild animal, it loses its fear
of humans and it needs that fear to survive long term. Always
remember that the next human the raccoon sees may hate them and try to
kill it.

-L.
July 27th 06, 05:56 PM
Lee Hirt wrote:
> I know this is an old post, but I simply had to respond. NEVER, EVER
> feed raccoons regardless whether the setting urban or country! I know
> they are cute, but they are also a major pest when they become
> attached to your property. With their little hands they can open just
> about anything they set their minds to. I heard more than one story
> about people coming home to find a family of raccoons have moved in.

So what? My Mom fed the coons and possums in her neighborhood from
1969-2001. Every day, every season. The neighborhood embraced the
wildlife there and looked after it.

>
> In addition they can be very vicious,

Yeah, the coons my Mom fed were so vicious they ate right along with
the cats - sometimes from the same bowls....

>develop a territorial attitude
> which may lead to home invasion, and can carry rabies.

Incidence of rabies in raccoons is relatively low. besides, I didn;t
say pet them - I said feed them.

>
> But just as important, when you feed a wild animal, it loses its fear
> of humans and it needs that fear to survive long term. Always
> remember that the next human the raccoon sees may hate them and try to
> kill it.

Like I said, it depends on where you live. If you are in a rural
setting, it's probably less impactful to feed them. In an urban
setting, I agree with you.

-L.

-L.
July 27th 06, 10:15 PM
Upscale wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> >
> > Incidence of rabies in raccoons is relatively low. besides, I didn;t
> > say pet them - I said feed them.
>
> Either you're not too bright or you're not very well informed. Which one is
> it?

Raccoons are only responsible for 37% of the reported cases of animals
having rabies. This has increased dramatically in the last 10 years.
In 2001 (latest data) there were roughly 4700 cases of animal rabies
and ZERO cases reported in humans. If you do not go outside when
racoons are around and if your companion animals are vaccinated, your
chances of contracting rabies is zero.

-L.

Upscale
July 27th 06, 10:39 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
> > > Incidence of rabies in raccoons is relatively low. besides, I didn;t
> > > say pet them - I said feed them.

> racoons are around and if your companion animals are vaccinated, your
> chances of contracting rabies is zero.

I wasn't replying in regards to rabies. I was replying in regards to feeding
them. They're vicious, hard to get rid of, extremely destructive animals.
I'd put them on part with rats and just as deserving to be eliminated,
probably even more so because many people like you don't see them as any
sort of serious threat.

I've seen raccoons cause thousands of dollars of damage to houses, lower
property values and be an enormous nuisance. We're not talking about pets
here, we're talking about wild animals without any redeeming social value
whatsoever when it comes to their interaction with humans.

-L.
July 27th 06, 11:01 PM
Upscale wrote:
>
> I wasn't replying in regards to rabies. I was replying in regards to feeding
> them. They're vicious, hard to get rid of, extremely destructive animals.

Not in my experience.

> I'd put them on part with rats and just as deserving to be eliminated,

Well, there ya go. Just kill animals because you find them inconvient,
eh? Ever hear of the concept of "living with nature"?


> probably even more so because many people like you don't see them as any
> sort of serious threat.

They aren't a serious threat. The biggest threat to humans from
raccoons are bites and rabies - neither of which you can get if you
don't expose yourelf to them.

>
> I've seen raccoons cause thousands of dollars of damage to houses, lower
> property values and be an enormous nuisance.

If that's the case, someone wasn't managing their property properly.

>We're not talking about pets
> here, we're talking about wild animals without any redeeming social value
> whatsoever when it comes to their interaction with humans.

Sez you. Another "humans can do whatever the **** they want with
animals because we CAN!" self-righteous moron...

-L.

Upscale
July 27th 06, 11:20 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
>
> Not in my experience.

Then you've had limited experience. Yeah, yeah, I know, your mom or someone
you know used to feed them.

> Well, there ya go. Just kill animals because you find them inconvenient,
> eh? Ever hear of the concept of "living with nature"?

In or on the outskirts of large cities, there's very little "living with
nature." You want to blame a growing human presence, fine. Just know that
you're not intelligent enough to "live with nature" and maintain your
current existence with computers and cars and houses with electricity and
all the other things our society currently enjoys.

> They aren't a serious threat. The biggest threat to humans from
> raccoons are bites and rabies - neither of which you can get if you
> don't expose yourelf to them.

If you're feeding them, then you're exposing yourself to them, period. You
can't just feed a couple of racoons and then expect them to move on. They
stay and destroy to get the food that they want. In addition, feeding them
causes them to lose their fear of humanity and then it's even harder to deal
with them.

> If that's the case, someone wasn't managing their property properly.

If a family of raccoons starts hanging around your house because you fed
them, how *exactly* would you manage your property? I know, you'd pay
several hundred dollars to buy traps or have someone else catch them and
then move them. At that point, they would go out and find another house to
terrorize. All you'd be doing is transferring your irresponsibility to some
other unfortunate person or family.

> Sez you. Another "humans can do whatever the **** they want with
> animals because we CAN!" self-righteous moron...

Well, you answered my initial questions very well. You lack valid knowledge
*AND* you're too stupid to know any better when it comes to racoons.

James
July 28th 06, 03:01 AM
Trouble with leaving food out for wild animals is that you might end up
with feeding rats.

Darryl
July 28th 06, 04:30 AM
acoons are cute but they also will tear your roof apart when they want to move
into the attic. They will spread dieases and may well be a danger to outside
animals.

I live in the country and while I do not wish to harm them I will spray them
with water, hit them with dog spray (pepper spray) and shoot their butts with
a pellet gun. If this does not work then I will shoot them, Thank God I have
only had to KILL one in the last 5 years. I feed stray cats here and I will
protect them

Darryl

Marvel
July 28th 06, 02:30 PM
"Darryl" > wrote in message
...
> acoons are cute but they also will tear your roof apart when they want to
> move
> into the attic. They will spread dieases and may well be a danger to
> outside
> animals.
>
> I live in the country and while I do not wish to harm them I will spray
> them
> with water, hit them with dog spray (pepper spray) and shoot their butts
> with
> a pellet gun. If this does not work then I will shoot them, Thank God I
> have
> only had to KILL one in the last 5 years. I feed stray cats here and I
> will
> protect them
>
> Darryl
>
The answer to all of your questions lies in the movie "Over the Hedge" This
is a true documentary of wildlife v/s urban sprawl. Rent it or go see it
today.
Trust me you will be informed
Marvel
>

-L.
July 28th 06, 07:00 PM
Upscale wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> >
> > Not in my experience.
>
> Then you've had limited experience. Yeah, yeah, I know, your mom or someone
> you know used to feed them.

Yeah, only 18 years living in the country with them, feeding them
daily.

****off, asshole Go find some defenseless animals to kill..

-L.

Upscale
July 28th 06, 11:23 PM
"-L." > wrote in message

I fully realize that you have the maturity and intelligence of a 6 year old,
but at least make a token effort to understand. Not *once* did I say to kill
them. I said not to feed them because then you can't get rid of them.

> ****off, asshole Go find some defenseless animals to kill..

Expected response for a lack of rebuttal. Guess you made your point eh? Now
that you've shown everybody what a joke you are, what are you going to do
for an encore?

<snicker>

Professor
July 28th 06, 11:49 PM
"Upscale" > wrote in message
...
> "-L." > wrote in message
>
> I fully realize that you have the maturity and intelligence of a 6 year
> old,
> but at least make a token effort to understand. Not *once* did I say to
> kill
> them. I said not to feed them because then you can't get rid of them.
>
>> ****off, asshole Go find some defenseless animals to kill..
>
> Expected response for a lack of rebuttal. Guess you made your point eh?
> Now
> that you've shown everybody what a joke you are, what are you going to do
> for an encore?
>
> <snicker>

Lee "L" is an asshole, but advocating the killing of raccoons is abhorable.
Both of you should get a life.

Magic Mood Jeep©
July 29th 06, 01:03 AM
In news:[email protected],
Professor purred:
> "Upscale" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "-L." > wrote in message
>>
>> I fully realize that you have the maturity and intelligence of a 6
>> year old,
>> but at least make a token effort to understand. Not *once* did I say
>> to kill
>> them. I said not to feed them because then you can't get rid of them.
>>
>>> ****off, asshole Go find some defenseless animals to kill..
>>
>> Expected response for a lack of rebuttal. Guess you made your point
>> eh? Now
>> that you've shown everybody what a joke you are, what are you going
>> to do for an encore?
>>
>> <snicker>
>
> Lee "L" is an asshole, but advocating the killing of raccoons is
> abhorable. Both of you should get a life.

That's twice I've seen you call "-L." by the name "Lee". I do believe *her*
name is Lynn (one of her other usernames is usenetlynn).

-L.
July 29th 06, 07:05 AM
Magic Mood Jeep© wrote:
>
> That's twice I've seen you call "-L." by the name "Lee". I do believe *her*
> name is Lynn (one of her other usernames is usenetlynn).

You're both wrong. Let the man keep proving the the world how stupid
he is.

-L.

Fred G. Mackey
April 4th 07, 07:47 AM
Kiran wrote:
> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> nights.
>
> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>
> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> when and where would you leave the food?

NO - not only no, but HELL NO.

Raccoons are cute, but they are not cuddly. They are vicious and
ferocious and can do just fine without your leaving your table scraps on
your back porch.

And that black lab next door? Well, the coon probably won't kill it,
but it could seriously scratch him up.

BTW - my only experience with these beautiful creatures is in urban
areas. I've lived in 2 houses in big cities (thousands of miles apart)
where they took up residence in the attic. They're opportunists.

One big problem with leaving food out for animals is you will attract
the kinds of animals you don't want.

Open your back door in the evening and see dozens of roaches scurrying
away that were eating the food you left out for the pretty songbirds and
you'll understand.

Fred G. Mackey
April 4th 07, 07:49 AM
-L. wrote:
> Upscale wrote:
>
>>"-L." > wrote in message
>>
>>>Incidence of rabies in raccoons is relatively low. besides, I didn;t
>>>say pet them - I said feed them.
>>
>>Either you're not too bright or you're not very well informed. Which one is
>>it?
>
>
> Raccoons are only responsible for 37% of the reported cases of animals
> having rabies.

Only 37% - no need to worry.

Hey, if the people who worked at the day-care center where you dropped
your kids off everyday were only found to consist of 37% child
molesters, would you have any reason to worry?


> This has increased dramatically in the last 10 years.
> In 2001 (latest data) there were roughly 4700 cases of animal rabies
> and ZERO cases reported in humans. If you do not go outside when
> racoons are around and if your companion animals are vaccinated, your
> chances of contracting rabies is zero.
>
> -L.
>

IBen Getiner
April 4th 07, 09:18 AM
On Apr 4, 2:49�am, "Fred G. Mackey" > wrote:
> -L. wrote:
> > Upscale wrote:
>
> >>"-L." > wrote in message
>
> >>>Incidence of rabies in raccoons is relatively low. *besides, I didn;t
> >>>say pet them - I said feed them.
>
> >>Either you're not too bright or you're not very well informed. Which one is
> >>it?
>
> > Raccoons are only responsible for 37% of the reported cases of animals
> > having rabies.
>
> Only 37% - no need to worry.
>
> Hey, if the people who worked at the day-care center where you dropped
> your kids off everyday were only found to consist of 37% child
> molesters, would you have any reason to worry?
>
>
>
> > This has increased dramatically in the last 10 years.
> > In 2001 (latest data) there were roughly 4700 cases of animal rabies
> > and ZERO cases reported in humans. *If you do not go outside when
> > racoons are around and if your companion animals are vaccinated, your
> > chances of contracting rabies is zero.
>
> > -L.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Most cats will allow a raccoon to come right up to their food bowl
and feed with them. For some reason, these two creatures seem to
tolerate the other's presence pretty well. Then along comes the rabid
racoon. The cat will allow him to approach just like any other. But
all it takes is one sneeze into the face of your cat (who's feeding on
the other side of the bowl) and it could contract the disease. We know
because many years ago, my brother-in-law (who's family lived next
door at the time) had this happen. His cat ended up having it's brain
sliced up and examined under a microscope because it when nuts. It
started secluding itself off in a quiet room, biting itself on the
back... snarling, chattering and fighting at the empty air (and then
it scratched somebody). That very week, they caught and killed a rabid
racoon the next block over. And we had all seen our cats and the coons
eating together in the early morning hours off and on during this
time. But we never thought anything of it. The county vet was the one
who informed them on how all this could happen without an actual bite.
Bottom line... Don't leave your outside cat's food where foragers like
raccoons can get to it. Give them measured portions and clean up the
leftovers before dusk falls. That's my advice. Take it or you might be
sorry!



IBen Getiner

William Graham
April 4th 07, 08:01 PM
"Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in message
...
> Kiran wrote:
>> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
>> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
>> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
>> nights.
>>
>> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
>> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
>> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>>
>> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
>> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
>> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
>> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>>
>> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
>> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
>> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>>
>> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
>> when and where would you leave the food?
>
> NO - not only no, but HELL NO.
>
> Raccoons are cute, but they are not cuddly. They are vicious and
> ferocious and can do just fine without your leaving your table scraps on
> your back porch.
>
> And that black lab next door? Well, the coon probably won't kill it, but
> it could seriously scratch him up.
>
> BTW - my only experience with these beautiful creatures is in urban areas.
> I've lived in 2 houses in big cities (thousands of miles apart) where they
> took up residence in the attic. They're opportunists.
>
> One big problem with leaving food out for animals is you will attract the
> kinds of animals you don't want.
>
> Open your back door in the evening and see dozens of roaches scurrying
> away that were eating the food you left out for the pretty songbirds and
> you'll understand.

Well, I'm sorry to have to give the other side of this story, but it is a
part of my experience, so here goes:
We live on the outskirts of town, with a Christmas tree farm behind us,
so we get lots of wild animals sniffing at our back porch.....We also have 4
outside cats, one of which is a feral male. We feed raccoons, squirrels and
an occasional Possum, as well as many birds. The raccoons get dog kibbles,
and because our area is plentiful, they only eat them in the Winter, and
when they can't find anything else to eat. Although raccoons will kill cats,
these leave our cats alone, and the cats leave them alone too. I think they
will only kill if there is competition for space or food, and neither is the
case with ours. One of our cats, Meggie, even plays with the young raccoons
under their mothers watchful eye.....I have seen both raccoons and squirrels
run over her while she is sleeping on the back porch under the sun. The
possum is strictly nocturnal, and runs at the slightest sound, so he/she is
no fun at all....The raccoons are very cute, and as long as they don't fight
with my cats, they are welcome. We have been feeding them for over 5 years
now, and there are less of them now than there were two or three years ago.
(they are sick of dog kibbles, which we buy for 50 lbs for under 10 dollars)
I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't stand
to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.

someone[_2_]
April 5th 07, 12:00 AM
"William Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Kiran wrote:
> >> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> >> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> >> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> >> nights.
> >>
> >> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> >> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> >> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
> >>
> >> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> >> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> >> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> >> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
> >>
> >> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> >> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> >> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
> >>
> >> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> >> when and where would you leave the food?
> >
> > NO - not only no, but HELL NO.
> >
> > Raccoons are cute, but they are not cuddly. They are vicious and
> > ferocious and can do just fine without your leaving your table scraps on
> > your back porch.
> >
> > And that black lab next door? Well, the coon probably won't kill it,
but
> > it could seriously scratch him up.
> >
> > BTW - my only experience with these beautiful creatures is in urban
areas.
> > I've lived in 2 houses in big cities (thousands of miles apart) where
they
> > took up residence in the attic. They're opportunists.
> >
> > One big problem with leaving food out for animals is you will attract
the
> > kinds of animals you don't want.
> >
> > Open your back door in the evening and see dozens of roaches scurrying
> > away that were eating the food you left out for the pretty songbirds and
> > you'll understand.
>
> Well, I'm sorry to have to give the other side of this story, but it is a
> part of my experience, so here goes:
> We live on the outskirts of town, with a Christmas tree farm behind
us,
> so we get lots of wild animals sniffing at our back porch.....We also have
4
> outside cats, one of which is a feral male. We feed raccoons, squirrels
and
> an occasional Possum, as well as many birds. The raccoons get dog kibbles,
> and because our area is plentiful, they only eat them in the Winter, and
> when they can't find anything else to eat. Although raccoons will kill
cats,
> these leave our cats alone, and the cats leave them alone too. I think
they
> will only kill if there is competition for space or food, and neither is
the
> case with ours. One of our cats, Meggie, even plays with the young
raccoons
> under their mothers watchful eye.....I have seen both raccoons and
squirrels
> run over her while she is sleeping on the back porch under the sun. The
> possum is strictly nocturnal, and runs at the slightest sound, so he/she
is
> no fun at all....The raccoons are very cute, and as long as they don't
fight
> with my cats, they are welcome. We have been feeding them for over 5 years
> now, and there are less of them now than there were two or three years
ago.
> (they are sick of dog kibbles, which we buy for 50 lbs for under 10
dollars)
> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't
stand
> to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
> matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
> wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.
>
>

I think you have an intelligent attitude to life. Thank you for your story,
which I enjoyed.

s.

The Horny Goat
April 7th 07, 12:58 AM
On Wed, 4 Apr 2007 12:01:31 -0700, "William Graham" >
wrote:

> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't stand
>to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
>matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
>wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.

Having had raccoons kill my magnificent 28 lb. ginger tom when I was a
teenager some 30 years there is absolutely no way in hell I can
approach this with a calm manner. I was off as a summer camp
counsellor when this happened and one of the first things I had to do
when I got home was pay the vet bill from the unsuccessful attempt to
save him.

I'm with the 'not only no but HELL NO!' people I'm afraid.

Joe Canuck
April 7th 07, 01:42 AM
The Horny Goat wrote:
> On Wed, 4 Apr 2007 12:01:31 -0700, "William Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't stand
>> to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
>> matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
>> wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.
>
> Having had raccoons kill my magnificent 28 lb. ginger tom when I was a
> teenager some 30 years there is absolutely no way in hell I can
> approach this with a calm manner. I was off as a summer camp
> counsellor when this happened and one of the first things I had to do
> when I got home was pay the vet bill from the unsuccessful attempt to
> save him.
>
> I'm with the 'not only no but HELL NO!' people I'm afraid.

No, nature takes care of itself... and raccoons are definitely not pets.

William Graham
April 7th 07, 02:07 AM
"Joe Canuck" > wrote in message
...
> The Horny Goat wrote:
>> On Wed, 4 Apr 2007 12:01:31 -0700, "William Graham" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't
>>> stand to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it
>>> is, no matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the
>>> cats wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.
>>
>> Having had raccoons kill my magnificent 28 lb. ginger tom when I was a
>> teenager some 30 years there is absolutely no way in hell I can
>> approach this with a calm manner. I was off as a summer camp
>> counsellor when this happened and one of the first things I had to do
>> when I got home was pay the vet bill from the unsuccessful attempt to
>> save him.
>>
>> I'm with the 'not only no but HELL NO!' people I'm afraid.
>
> No, nature takes care of itself... and raccoons are definitely not pets.

Pets are whatever you make pets.....Cats didn't start out as pets
either....Somewhere, at some time, someone first turned a cat into a pet.
I have known of cats that have been killed by raccoons. But our cats are
outside cats, and we live on the edge of town where there are plenty of wild
animals. At any time, one of our cats may disappear, never to be seen again,
and we won't know what happened to him or her. There is no way I can control
this, unless I remove the cat doors and force all my cats to spend the rest
of their lives indoors. - I refuse to do that, so I (and they) will just
have to take our chances. Life is not a guaranteed condition. Anyone, at any
time, could drop dead from a whole variety of different things. If you are
unhappy with that (as I am) then I suggest you blame the one responsible.
(God) Unless, like me, you believe in no God, and consequently have no one
to blame at all. In the meantime, I will feed whatever happens to be hungry
who shows up at my door asking for a handout....After all, I was not the one
who created this veil of tears, so don't blame me for trying to make it a
little better.

cybercat
April 7th 07, 02:52 AM
"William Graham" > wrote
> Pets are whatever you make pets.....Cats didn't start out as pets
> either....Somewhere, at some time, someone first turned a cat into a pet.
> I have known of cats that have been killed by raccoons. But our cats
> are outside cats, and we live on the edge of town where there are plenty
> of wild animals. At any time, one of our cats may disappear, never to be
> seen again, and we won't know what happened to him or her. There is no way
> I can control this, unless I remove the cat doors and force all my cats to
> spend the rest of their lives indoors. - I refuse to do that, so I (and
> they) will just have to take our chances. Life is not a guaranteed
> condition. Anyone, at any time, could drop dead from a whole variety of
> different things. If you are unhappy with that (as I am) then I suggest
> you blame the one responsible. (God) Unless, like me, you believe in no
> God, and consequently have no one to blame at all. In the meantime, I will
> feed whatever happens to be hungry who shows up at my door asking for a
> handout....After all, I was not the one who created this veil of tears, so
> don't blame me for trying to make it a little better.

I blame you for being an asshole. Your cats are domesticated animals
that should not be put at risk in this way, e.g., exposed to wild animals
that may be predators. People like you should not have cats.

Sherry
April 7th 07, 03:24 AM
On Apr 4, 2:01 pm, "William Graham" > wrote:
> "Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Kiran wrote:
> >> I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
> >> (one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
> >> our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
> >> nights.
>
> >> General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
> >> will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
> >> out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>
> >> However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
> >> with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
> >> and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
> >> bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>
> >> I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
> >> want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
> >> (There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>
> >> So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
> >> when and where would you leave the food?
>
> > NO - not only no, but HELL NO.
>
> > Raccoons are cute, but they are not cuddly. They are vicious and
> > ferocious and can do just fine without your leaving your table scraps on
> > your back porch.
>
> > And that black lab next door? Well, the coon probably won't kill it, but
> > it could seriously scratch him up.
>
> > BTW - my only experience with these beautiful creatures is in urban areas.
> > I've lived in 2 houses in big cities (thousands of miles apart) where they
> > took up residence in the attic. They're opportunists.
>
> > One big problem with leaving food out for animals is you will attract the
> > kinds of animals you don't want.
>
> > Open your back door in the evening and see dozens of roaches scurrying
> > away that were eating the food you left out for the pretty songbirds and
> > you'll understand.
>
> Well, I'm sorry to have to give the other side of this story, but it is a
> part of my experience, so here goes:
> We live on the outskirts of town, with a Christmas tree farm behind us,
> so we get lots of wild animals sniffing at our back porch.....We also have 4
> outside cats, one of which is a feral male. We feed raccoons, squirrels and
> an occasional Possum, as well as many birds. The raccoons get dog kibbles,
> and because our area is plentiful, they only eat them in the Winter, and
> when they can't find anything else to eat. Although raccoons will kill cats,
> these leave our cats alone, and the cats leave them alone too. I think they
> will only kill if there is competition for space or food, and neither is the
> case with ours. One of our cats, Meggie, even plays with the young raccoons
> under their mothers watchful eye.....I have seen both raccoons and squirrels
> run over her while she is sleeping on the back porch under the sun. The
> possum is strictly nocturnal, and runs at the slightest sound, so he/she is
> no fun at all....The raccoons are very cute, and as long as they don't fight
> with my cats, they are welcome. We have been feeding them for over 5 years
> now, and there are less of them now than there were two or three years ago.
> (they are sick of dog kibbles, which we buy for 50 lbs for under 10 dollars)
> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't stand
> to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
> matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
> wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.- Hide quoted text -
>
Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
come out.
I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.

Sherry

Lynne
April 7th 07, 03:40 AM
on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 02:24:22 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:

> Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
> I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
> come out.
> I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
> the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
> they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
> Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
> around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.

Feeding wildlife eventually gets that wildlife killed. When they rely on
humans for food they become nuicances and worse, and that will eventually
lead to the extermination of them and/or their offspring. So if you think
racoons and other wild animals are cute, stop feeding them.

--
Lynne

Claude V. Lucas
April 7th 07, 03:56 AM
In article >,
Lynne > wrote:
>on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 02:24:22 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
>> Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
>> I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
>> come out.
>> I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
>> the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
>> they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
>> Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
>> around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.
>
>Feeding wildlife eventually gets that wildlife killed. When they rely on
>humans for food they become nuicances and worse, and that will eventually
>lead to the extermination of them and/or their offspring. So if you think
>racoons and other wild animals are cute, stop feeding them.
>

There was a family of raccoons that used to visit at a place where
I used to live. They were pretty tame for wild critters. One
evening I fell asleep on the couch in front of the TV and woke
up with 4 in the living room because I'd left the front door open.
When I mentioned to them that they would probably be better off
outside they calmly lined up and marched out the door with
no problems.

OTOH, in another part of the country a friend of mine had an
episode with an apparantly tame raccoon that ended with her
and a couple of her kids having to undergo postexposure rabies
prophylaxis.

Not fun.

Not cute.

As always, YMMV.

Fred G. Mackey
April 7th 07, 04:19 AM
William Graham wrote:
> "Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Kiran wrote:
>>
>>>I have a cat but this is not about her, it is about a group of raccoons
>>>(one adult and five children). They have been spotted sniffing around
>>>our and our neighbors' yards and porchces this summer, mostly late
>>>nights.
>>>
>>>General consensus on the street is to have no food or food smells that
>>>will attract them, and I would certainly not want to leave a trash bag
>>>out that for them to rip apart and make a mess.
>>>
>>>However --- and having grown up in urban areas, I have no experience
>>>with raccoons --- part of me says they too are living creatures, hungry
>>>and looking for food, shouldn't I leave some out for them too? It
>>>bothers my heart that I am throwing food away they could have eaten.
>>>
>>>I do realize it is a pack of six, not one little cute pet. I also don't
>>>want any potential harm to my kids, my cat, my neighbor kids and cats.
>>>(There is a Black Lab next door who I am sure can look after himself!)
>>>
>>>So if you know raccoons, would you feed them in this situation? If so,
>>>when and where would you leave the food?
>>
>>NO - not only no, but HELL NO.
>>
>>Raccoons are cute, but they are not cuddly. They are vicious and
>>ferocious and can do just fine without your leaving your table scraps on
>>your back porch.
>>
>>And that black lab next door? Well, the coon probably won't kill it, but
>>it could seriously scratch him up.
>>
>>BTW - my only experience with these beautiful creatures is in urban areas.
>>I've lived in 2 houses in big cities (thousands of miles apart) where they
>>took up residence in the attic. They're opportunists.
>>
>>One big problem with leaving food out for animals is you will attract the
>>kinds of animals you don't want.
>>
>>Open your back door in the evening and see dozens of roaches scurrying
>>away that were eating the food you left out for the pretty songbirds and
>>you'll understand.
>
>
> Well, I'm sorry to have to give the other side of this story, but it is a
> part of my experience, so here goes:

After reading your "other side of this story", I don't get why you say
you're "sorry" or what the point is.

So you have not had bad experiences feeding the animals in your part of
the woods - okay. I still stand by my assertion that you should not do so.

Look, you can wander across busy intersections for 20 years and not get
hit by a car, but that doesn't make it a good idea.


> We live on the outskirts of town, with a Christmas tree farm behind us,
> so we get lots of wild animals sniffing at our back porch.....We also have 4
> outside cats, one of which is a feral male. We feed raccoons, squirrels and
> an occasional Possum, as well as many birds. The raccoons get dog kibbles,
> and because our area is plentiful, they only eat them in the Winter, and
> when they can't find anything else to eat. Although raccoons will kill cats,
> these leave our cats alone, and the cats leave them alone too. I think they
> will only kill if there is competition for space or food, and neither is the
> case with ours. One of our cats, Meggie, even plays with the young raccoons
> under their mothers watchful eye.....I have seen both raccoons and squirrels
> run over her while she is sleeping on the back porch under the sun. The
> possum is strictly nocturnal, and runs at the slightest sound, so he/she is
> no fun at all....The raccoons are very cute, and as long as they don't fight
> with my cats, they are welcome. We have been feeding them for over 5 years
> now, and there are less of them now than there were two or three years ago.
> (they are sick of dog kibbles, which we buy for 50 lbs for under 10 dollars)
> I think that everyone's situation is different, and my wife can't stand
> to see any animal go hungry, so she is going to feed what ever it is, no
> matter what. She even fed a family of rats for a while, but the cats
> wouldn't put up with that, and they eventually killed them all off.
>
>

Fred G. Mackey
April 7th 07, 04:25 AM
Lynne wrote:
> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 02:24:22 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
>
>>Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
>>I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
>>come out.
>>I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
>>the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
>>they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
>>Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
>>around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.
>
>
> Feeding wildlife eventually gets that wildlife killed. When they rely on
> humans for food they become nuicances and worse, and that will eventually
> lead to the extermination of them and/or their offspring. So if you think
> racoons and other wild animals are cute, stop feeding them.
>

Agreed - the worst story I've heard was when I visited the Grand Canyon
- and I'm sure this is not common and was meant to emphasize that people
should not feed animals, but anyway, here it goes.

People fed the cute little deers. Deers become accustom to human food.
They raid trash cans and in the process, chow down on potato chip bags
- that is the bags, not the potato chips in them.

So, deer eats trash. Trash blocks intestines. The deer basically
starve to death, despite eating as much as they can - it cannot be digested.

Despite the warnings, I saw people feeding animals there. What's even
more horrific (since people feeding animals probably didn't mean any
harm) was all the trash that some people apparently thought was okay to
discard where they stood.

22brix
April 7th 07, 04:59 AM
"William Graham" > wrote in message
. ..
> Pets are whatever you make pets.....Cats didn't start out as pets
> either....Somewhere, at some time, someone first turned a cat into a pet.
> I have known of cats that have been killed by raccoons. But our cats
> are outside cats, and we live on the edge of town where there are plenty
> of wild animals. At any time, one of our cats may disappear, never to be
> seen again, and we won't know what happened to him or her. There is no way
> I can control this, unless I remove the cat doors and force all my cats to
> spend the rest of their lives indoors. - I refuse to do that, so I (and
> they) will just have to take our chances. Life is not a guaranteed
> condition. Anyone, at any time, could drop dead from a whole variety of
> different things. If you are unhappy with that (as I am) then I suggest
> you blame the one responsible. (God) Unless, like me, you believe in no
> God, and consequently have no one to blame at all. In the meantime, I will
> feed whatever happens to be hungry who shows up at my door asking for a
> handout....After all, I was not the one who created this veil of tears, so
> don't blame me for trying to make it a little better.
>
You could also be jeopardizing the lives of children living around
you--raccoons carry other diseases besides rabies, some of which are
zoonotic and have caused very serious disease including raccoon roundworms.
It's a horrible disease, attacking the eyes and brain. Several children
have died from this, including a small girl in Monterey area in California.
Raccoons tend to defecate in middens and can shed a tremendous number of
eggs. The eggs are tough and can remain in the environment for a long time.
By feeding them, you are going to have more raccoons and consequently more
raccoon feces. As much as I think they're cute, feeding them is a very bad
idea.

Several references:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11971766&dopt=Abstract

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baylisascaris

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/baylisascaris/factsht_baylisascaris.htm

Rhonda
April 7th 07, 07:23 AM
Fred G. Mackey wrote:

> People fed the cute little deers. Deers become accustom to human food.
> They raid trash cans and in the process, chow down on potato chip bags
> - that is the bags, not the potato chips in them.

Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
ever been fed human food or not.

Rhonda

Lynne
April 7th 07, 12:40 PM
on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 06:23:36 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:

> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
> ever been fed human food or not.

Which is why unintentional feeding is just as bad as intentional feeding.
People need to secure their trash cans from wildlife.

--
Lynne

Joe Canuck
April 7th 07, 01:02 PM
Lynne wrote:
> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 06:23:36 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:
>
>> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
>> ever been fed human food or not.
>
> Which is why unintentional feeding is just as bad as intentional feeding.
> People need to secure their trash cans from wildlife.
>

There is a neighbor way up in northern Quebec that feeds birds year round.

Normally in the winter ALL the birds leave the area because it is much
too cold for them to be hanging around, but when they have this source
of food they tend to hang around.

When the lady goes to Florida for 3 weeks in the midst of the winter,
I'm sure the birds are left in a bit of a quandary... head south or wait
for more food?

Feeding them like this screws them up in many ways.

Sherry
April 7th 07, 03:36 PM
On Apr 6, 9:40 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 02:24:22 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
> > Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
> > I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
> > come out.
> > I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
> > the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
> > they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
> > Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
> > around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.
>
> Feeding wildlife eventually gets that wildlife killed. When they rely on
> humans for food they become nuicances and worse, and that will eventually
> lead to the extermination of them and/or their offspring. So if you think
> racoons and other wild animals are cute, stop feeding them.
>
> --
> Lynne

Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
different than most.
I live in the middle of a 100-acre farm, which is unused
agriculturally since I got it. I sometimes keep a "critter block" in
the back yard (back yard=about 75 yards from the back door), along
with bird feeders. Near the pond is a mineral block for the deer, and
hen scratch for the wild turkeys and quail in the winter. There is a
massive dewberry thicket there, and a brush pile, where cottontails
live.
Wildlife rehabilitation has always been an interest for me. I've
helped with the animals brought in to the humane society, have raised
orphaned and injured animals, under the supervision of a licensed
wildlife rehabilitator. I enjoy watching wildlife, but yes, I know
they aren't pets and are meant to be watched, not touched. I have no
children, no neighbors, no traffic.
Sorry for the long explanation, but I didn't want to the close with
the impression that I''m throwing stale Twinkies on the back porch in
the middle of an urban neighborhood. :-)

Sherry

Sherry
April 7th 07, 03:41 PM
On Apr 7, 7:02 am, Joe Canuck > wrote:
> Lynne wrote:
> > on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 06:23:36 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:
>
> >> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
> >> ever been fed human food or not.
>
> > Which is why unintentional feeding is just as bad as intentional feeding.
> > People need to secure their trash cans from wildlife.
>
> There is a neighbor way up in northern Quebec that feeds birds year round.
>
> Normally in the winter ALL the birds leave the area because it is much
> too cold for them to be hanging around, but when they have this source
> of food they tend to hang around.
>
> When the lady goes to Florida for 3 weeks in the midst of the winter,
> I'm sure the birds are left in a bit of a quandary... head south or wait
> for more food?
>
> Feeding them like this screws them up in many ways.

I'm sure it's because our climates are so different, but our birds
totally diss us from spring until the first freeze. Even if we put
food out, they don't touch it. We always just put the feeders away for
the season. Last year I planted a row of sunflowers just for fun, and
the birds were all over them as soon as the seed pods formed. Guess
they like the fresh stuff better.

Sherry

kraut
April 7th 07, 06:13 PM
I will feed any and all critters that come around during the winter
but then when warmer weather comes where the snow and ice let up then
I wean them back to fending for themselves. I have been doing so
forever it seems and most likely will continue until I am no longer
able to and I see nothing wrong with it.




************************************************** ***
E-mail address altered to foil spam.
Reply to news groups for all to see please.

_
/ )
(\__/) ( (
) ( ) )
={ }= / /
) `-------/ /
( /
\ |
,'\ , ,'
`-'\ ,---\ | \
_) ) `. \ /
(__/ ) )
(_/



(\__/)
)oo(
={ >}=


************************************************** ***

William Graham
April 7th 07, 08:44 PM
"Sherry" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Apr 6, 9:40 pm, Lynne > wrote:
>> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 02:24:22 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>>
>> > Well, yeah, I feed everything too. But the cats don't go out unless
>> > I'm out, and never late, which is when the raccoons/bunnies/armadillos
>> > come out.
>> > I've heard people tell that they've seen 'coons and cats eating out of
>> > the same dish. No way would I trust one. They're a wild animal, and
>> > they have claws, wicked teeth, and outweigh a cat by far.
>> > Personally, I like raccoons. They look like little hoodlums running
>> > around in the yard at night. But I'd *never* expose the cats to one.
>>
>> Feeding wildlife eventually gets that wildlife killed. When they rely on
>> humans for food they become nuicances and worse, and that will eventually
>> lead to the extermination of them and/or their offspring. So if you
>> think
>> racoons and other wild animals are cute, stop feeding them.
>>
>> --
>> Lynne
>
> Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
> facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
> behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
> your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
> not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
> different than most.
> I live in the middle of a 100-acre farm, which is unused
> agriculturally since I got it. I sometimes keep a "critter block" in
> the back yard (back yard=about 75 yards from the back door), along
> with bird feeders. Near the pond is a mineral block for the deer, and
> hen scratch for the wild turkeys and quail in the winter. There is a
> massive dewberry thicket there, and a brush pile, where cottontails
> live.
> Wildlife rehabilitation has always been an interest for me. I've
> helped with the animals brought in to the humane society, have raised
> orphaned and injured animals, under the supervision of a licensed
> wildlife rehabilitator. I enjoy watching wildlife, but yes, I know
> they aren't pets and are meant to be watched, not touched. I have no
> children, no neighbors, no traffic.
> Sorry for the long explanation, but I didn't want to the close with
> the impression that I''m throwing stale Twinkies on the back porch in
> the middle of an urban neighborhood. :-)
>
> Sherry
>
We each live under different circumstances. What I do reflects my particular
circumstances and my general experience....I don't expect others to do the
same as I do, but, since the question was asked, I simply told my story. "In
general" applies to some statistical norm, and the information might be very
useful, but I don't live according to some statistical norm. If my behavior
differs from the norm, it is because I am in a situation that differs from
the norm. I would expect everyone else to adjust their behavior according to
whatever their particular circumstances dictate.......

William Graham
April 7th 07, 08:51 PM
"kraut" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> I will feed any and all critters that come around during the winter
> but then when warmer weather comes where the snow and ice let up then
> I wean them back to fending for themselves. I have been doing so
> forever it seems and most likely will continue until I am no longer
> able to and I see nothing wrong with it.
>
During Springtime around here, (which is now) the food I leave out for the
raccoons goes untouched....There is so much other stuff for them to eat that
they won't touch the crummy dog kibbles. In general, they will only eat them
in the dead of Winter, and even then, only as a last resort. When the choice
is to starve or eat the kibbles, they will reluctantly eat the
kibbles.......I also leave out a bucket of water during the dry
season......No animal on my property will ever die of either hunger or
thirst.......

Fred G. Mackey
April 7th 07, 09:06 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> Fred G. Mackey wrote:
>
>> People fed the cute little deers. Deers become accustom to human
>> food. They raid trash cans and in the process, chow down on potato
>> chip bags - that is the bags, not the potato chips in them.
>
>
> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
> ever been fed human food or not.

To an extent that's true, but if the animals retain their natural fear
of humans, they're unlikely to raid trash cans in the first place.




> Rhonda
>

Fred G. Mackey
April 7th 07, 09:09 PM
Joe Canuck wrote:
> Lynne wrote:
>
>> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 06:23:36 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:
>>
>>> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether
>>> they've ever been fed human food or not.
>>
>>
>> Which is why unintentional feeding is just as bad as intentional
>> feeding. People need to secure their trash cans from wildlife.
>>
>
> There is a neighbor way up in northern Quebec that feeds birds year round.
>
> Normally in the winter ALL the birds leave the area because it is much
> too cold for them to be hanging around, but when they have this source
> of food they tend to hang around.
>

I've only lived here in Colorado for 2 years, but the first year, it was
a mild winter and the ponds near the office did not completely freeze
over. This year, they did - we nearly broke a record for snow on the
ground. So there was no grass for them to munch on and no water for
them to fish in - End result - lots less geese and lots less geese poop
all over the place. And I thought pigeons were bad.

> When the lady goes to Florida for 3 weeks in the midst of the winter,
> I'm sure the birds are left in a bit of a quandary... head south or wait
> for more food?
>
> Feeding them like this screws them up in many ways.

William Graham
April 7th 07, 09:58 PM
"Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in message
. ..
> Rhonda wrote:
>> Fred G. Mackey wrote:
>>
>>> People fed the cute little deers. Deers become accustom to human food.
>>> They raid trash cans and in the process, chow down on potato chip bags -
>>> that is the bags, not the potato chips in them.
>>
>>
>> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
>> ever been fed human food or not.
>
> To an extent that's true, but if the animals retain their natural fear of
> humans, they're unlikely to raid trash cans in the first place.
>
>> Rhonda
>>
Unfortunately, as we humans eat up more and more of their natural habitat,
they are driven to overcome their, "natural fear" and live closer and closer
to us....Witness the coyote that wandered into a New York fast food joint
the other day....(A Quisnos, I think) If he was hungry enough, then what did
he have to lose?

William Graham
April 7th 07, 10:34 PM
"William Graham" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> "Fred G. Mackey" > wrote in message
> . ..
>> Rhonda wrote:
>>> Fred G. Mackey wrote:
>>>
>>>> People fed the cute little deers. Deers become accustom to human food.
>>>> They raid trash cans and in the process, chow down on potato chip
>>>> bags - that is the bags, not the potato chips in them.
>>>
>>>
>>> Actually, I think a hungry animal will raid a trash can whether they've
>>> ever been fed human food or not.
>>
>> To an extent that's true, but if the animals retain their natural fear of
>> humans, they're unlikely to raid trash cans in the first place.
>>
>>> Rhonda
>>>
> Unfortunately, as we humans eat up more and more of their natural habitat,
> they are driven to overcome their, "natural fear" and live closer and
> closer to us....Witness the coyote that wandered into a New York fast food
> joint the other day....(A Quisnos, I think) If he was hungry enough, then
> what did he have to lose?
>
If I had been there, I would have ordered him a foot long roast beef, and
told them to hold the onions.....:^)

Lynne
April 8th 07, 01:17 AM
on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 14:36:29 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:

> Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
> facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
> behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
> your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
> not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
> different than most.

My post wasn't neccessarily directed at you, but at people in general who
don't understand the bigger problem of feeding wildlife and discouraging
them from their natural fear of humans. It ultimately leads to wildlife
being killed all too often (for example, bears in Yosemite), and that
****es me off royally.

--
Lynne

Moonlight Mile
July 5th 07, 08:05 PM
X-No-Archive:

In article >,
Lynne > wrote:

> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 14:36:29 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
> > Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
> > facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
> > behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
> > your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
> > not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
> > different than most.
>
> My post wasn't neccessarily directed at you, but at people in general who
> don't understand the bigger problem of feeding wildlife and discouraging
> them from their natural fear of humans. It ultimately leads to wildlife
> being killed all too often (for example, bears in Yosemite), and that
> ****es me off royally.

Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I won't be
doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying to find
a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural area--this is
just background, i.e. I'm venting. The cats like to come by at night, but at
night the raccoons and opossums eat _all_ the cat food that I put out. So I
decided to just put cat food out during the day and early evening. Raccoons are
"cute", but they are ravenous and will get into any food they can find--they can
figure out latches. They will dig up the lawn under your bird feeder. They will,
if they can reach the bird feeder and pull it down, break it open for the bird
feed. I have shot a few raccoons (I'm not exactly proud of this) over the past
1-1/2 years since the raccoons started coming during the late evening or even
during the day. Just when I thought I had gotten rid of all the coons in my
area, several more come along to replace them. I nearly shot a mother coon until
I saw the 5 or 6 quite small coons following her--my cruelty has limits. I no
longer bother shooting the raccoons since all the strays I'd been feeding are
gone by: getting shot as pests, starved or froze to death--last winter which was
brutal in my area, were taken by predators, or moved on ( I prefer to think
this). I kept putting food out all winter for them but they stopped coming when
the weather turned very cold and the snow was deep in early to mid-January.
Raccoons and opossums are not a problem in the colder part of winter since they
hibernate, or something close to it.

Aside from being destructive, I've been warned not to try to chase them off or
kick one. They will turn on you, latch onto your leg and they don't let go. They
can carry rabies, and if you see one around during the day (not at all normal
behavior) there is a fair chance that that raccoon is rabid. If you have to
shoot or club to death (people have had to do this) a suspected rabid raccoon,
call the state police or Dept. of Environmental Conservation for cleanup. If you
must club the raccoon to death in self-defense, you are exposing yourself to the
raccoons bodily fluids blood, saliva, etc. Any animal (or person) not vaccinated
that is exposed to the raccoon or it's blood is at risk of contracting rabies,
so the raccoon must be tested and the carcass properly disposed of. Burning the
carcass is not sufficient, I'm told.

Rabies is almost always fatal. It must be treated as soon as possible if the
raccoon tests positive or can't be found.

Nature is often cruel,
MM

William Graham
July 5th 07, 08:21 PM
"Moonlight Mile" > wrote in message
...
> X-No-Archive:
>
> In article >,
> Lynne > wrote:
>
>> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 14:36:29 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>>
>> > Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
>> > facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
>> > behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
>> > your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
>> > not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
>> > different than most.
>>
>> My post wasn't neccessarily directed at you, but at people in general who
>> don't understand the bigger problem of feeding wildlife and discouraging
>> them from their natural fear of humans. It ultimately leads to wildlife
>> being killed all too often (for example, bears in Yosemite), and that
>> ****es me off royally.
>
> Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I
> won't be
> doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying
> to find
> a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural area--this
> is
> just background, i.e. I'm venting. The cats like to come by at night, but
> at
> night the raccoons and opossums eat _all_ the cat food that I put out. So
> I
> decided to just put cat food out during the day and early evening.
> Raccoons are
> "cute", but they are ravenous and will get into any food they can
> find--they can
> figure out latches. They will dig up the lawn under your bird feeder. They
> will,
> if they can reach the bird feeder and pull it down, break it open for the
> bird
> feed. I have shot a few raccoons (I'm not exactly proud of this) over the
> past
> 1-1/2 years since the raccoons started coming during the late evening or
> even
> during the day. Just when I thought I had gotten rid of all the coons in
> my
> area, several more come along to replace them. I nearly shot a mother coon
> until
> I saw the 5 or 6 quite small coons following her--my cruelty has limits. I
> no
> longer bother shooting the raccoons since all the strays I'd been feeding
> are
> gone by: getting shot as pests, starved or froze to death--last winter
> which was
> brutal in my area, were taken by predators, or moved on ( I prefer to
> think
> this). I kept putting food out all winter for them but they stopped coming
> when
> the weather turned very cold and the snow was deep in early to
> mid-January.
> Raccoons and opossums are not a problem in the colder part of winter since
> they
> hibernate, or something close to it.
>
> Aside from being destructive, I've been warned not to try to chase them
> off or
> kick one. They will turn on you, latch onto your leg and they don't let
> go. They
> can carry rabies, and if you see one around during the day (not at all
> normal
> behavior) there is a fair chance that that raccoon is rabid. If you have
> to
> shoot or club to death (people have had to do this) a suspected rabid
> raccoon,
> call the state police or Dept. of Environmental Conservation for cleanup.
> If you
> must club the raccoon to death in self-defense, you are exposing yourself
> to the
> raccoons bodily fluids blood, saliva, etc. Any animal (or person) not
> vaccinated
> that is exposed to the raccoon or it's blood is at risk of contracting
> rabies,
> so the raccoon must be tested and the carcass properly disposed of.
> Burning the
> carcass is not sufficient, I'm told.
>
> Rabies is almost always fatal. It must be treated as soon as possible if
> the
> raccoon tests positive or can't be found.
>
> Nature is often cruel,
> MM

On the other hand.....

I feed the raccoons that come up on my rear deck. I feed them dog food, and
always the cheapest brand (37-1/2 lb. bags of "Maintain") They don't
particularly like it, but if they are faced with starvation, then they will
eat it. And that's good, because I don't like to encourage them to eat at my
place. The raccoons and my cats have come to an understanding. It consists
mostly of not paying any attention to one another. Although my sweetest cat,
Meggie, will play with the baby raccoons under their mama's watchful eye.
Our coons are not rabid....The state keeps watch on that, and issues
warnings when a rabies epidemic infests a population. They dart and test the
coon population randomly all year long. The only thing I have to worry about
is when large rogue males come to eat. This happens rarely, and my cats (I
have 4 cats) are all too smart to mess with them when it does. But my cats
are outside cats, and they face many hazards that inside cats don't have to
worry about. Raccoons are just one of those hazards. I believe their freedom
is worth the risk, and I treat them accordingly. Since the cats and raccoons
don't have to compete for food, they seem to get along remarkably well. We
also feed squirrels, birds, and an occasional 'possum....

Ted Davis
July 5th 07, 08:59 PM
On Thu, 05 Jul 2007 19:05:19 GMT, Moonlight Mile
> wrote:

>Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I won't be
>doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying to find
>a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural area--this is
>just background, i.e. I'm venting.

There is a solution that allows you to feed the cats but not the
vermin: a feeding platform on an unclimbable support between a yard
and a meter from the nearest point the vermin can get to. This is
based on the fact that cats (most of them) can leap but coons and
possums can't. I found an example on the Web, but I can't find it
now.

I used that concept to construct a possum and coon proof cat flap.

--
T.E.D. )
Remove "gearbox.maem." from address - that one is dead

William Graham
July 5th 07, 09:33 PM
"Ted Davis" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 05 Jul 2007 19:05:19 GMT, Moonlight Mile
> > wrote:
>
>>Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I
>>won't be
>>doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying
>>to find
>>a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural area--this
>>is
>>just background, i.e. I'm venting.
>
> There is a solution that allows you to feed the cats but not the
> vermin: a feeding platform on an unclimbable support between a yard
> and a meter from the nearest point the vermin can get to. This is
> based on the fact that cats (most of them) can leap but coons and
> possums can't. I found an example on the Web, but I can't find it
> now.
>
> I used that concept to construct a possum and coon proof cat flap.
>
A good idea.....I don't feed many stray cats.....The ones I do feed are all
smart enough to use my cat doors to come inside. The raccoons won't do that
because my cats won't let them in the house, and because the cat doors are
the smallest I can buy....Even the cats can barely squeeze through them. The
dog food that I leave out for the coons is unpalatable to the cats. The
secret is not giving the coons anything that they can learn to like too
much. They will only eat the dog kibbles as a last resort, and they have to
intrude on the cat's territory in order to do that.........When I first
started this (about 5 years ago) the coon population built up rapidly....At
one time there were about 20 or more raccoons eating the dog kibbles....I
was on the verge of calling animal control and having them trapped and taken
away. (They bring them way out in the woods somewhere and let them go) but
then, I noticed the population dropping....Over a period of about a year, it
dropped all the way down to only about 5 or 6 coons a week eating.....Today
it is even less than that. It's because no creature can eat "Maintain"
kibbles (About $9.00 for a 37-1/2 lb. bag) for very long without throwing
up....:^)

Baldoni
July 6th 07, 12:14 PM
William Graham wrote on 05/07/2007 :
> "Moonlight Mile" > wrote in message
> ...
>> X-No-Archive:
>>
>> In article >,
>> Lynne > wrote:
>>
>>> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 14:36:29 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>>>
>>> > Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
>>> > facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
>>> > behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
>>> > your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
>>> > not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
>>> > different than most.
>>>
>>> My post wasn't neccessarily directed at you, but at people in general who
>>> don't understand the bigger problem of feeding wildlife and discouraging
>>> them from their natural fear of humans. It ultimately leads to wildlife
>>> being killed all too often (for example, bears in Yosemite), and that
>>> ****es me off royally.
>>
>> Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I
>> won't be
>> doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying to
>> find
>> a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural area--this
>> is
>> just background, i.e. I'm venting. The cats like to come by at night, but
>> at
>> night the raccoons and opossums eat _all_ the cat food that I put out. So I
>> decided to just put cat food out during the day and early evening. Raccoons
>> are
>> "cute", but they are ravenous and will get into any food they can
>> find--they can
>> figure out latches. They will dig up the lawn under your bird feeder. They
>> will,
>> if they can reach the bird feeder and pull it down, break it open for the
>> bird
>> feed. I have shot a few raccoons (I'm not exactly proud of this) over the
>> past
>> 1-1/2 years since the raccoons started coming during the late evening or
>> even
>> during the day. Just when I thought I had gotten rid of all the coons in my
>> area, several more come along to replace them. I nearly shot a mother coon
>> until
>> I saw the 5 or 6 quite small coons following her--my cruelty has limits. I
>> no
>> longer bother shooting the raccoons since all the strays I'd been feeding
>> are
>> gone by: getting shot as pests, starved or froze to death--last winter
>> which was
>> brutal in my area, were taken by predators, or moved on ( I prefer to think
>> this). I kept putting food out all winter for them but they stopped coming
>> when
>> the weather turned very cold and the snow was deep in early to mid-January.
>> Raccoons and opossums are not a problem in the colder part of winter since
>> they
>> hibernate, or something close to it.
>>
>> Aside from being destructive, I've been warned not to try to chase them off
>> or
>> kick one. They will turn on you, latch onto your leg and they don't let go.
>> They
>> can carry rabies, and if you see one around during the day (not at all
>> normal
>> behavior) there is a fair chance that that raccoon is rabid. If you have to
>> shoot or club to death (people have had to do this) a suspected rabid
>> raccoon,
>> call the state police or Dept. of Environmental Conservation for cleanup.
>> If you
>> must club the raccoon to death in self-defense, you are exposing yourself
>> to the
>> raccoons bodily fluids blood, saliva, etc. Any animal (or person) not
>> vaccinated
>> that is exposed to the raccoon or it's blood is at risk of contracting
>> rabies,
>> so the raccoon must be tested and the carcass properly disposed of. Burning
>> the
>> carcass is not sufficient, I'm told.
>>
>> Rabies is almost always fatal. It must be treated as soon as possible if
>> the
>> raccoon tests positive or can't be found.
>>
>> Nature is often cruel,
>> MM
>
> On the other hand.....
>
> I feed the raccoons that come up on my rear deck. I feed them dog food, and
> always the cheapest brand (37-1/2 lb. bags of "Maintain") They don't
> particularly like it, but if they are faced with starvation, then they will
> eat it. And that's good, because I don't like to encourage them to eat at my
> place. The raccoons and my cats have come to an understanding. It consists
> mostly of not paying any attention to one another. Although my sweetest cat,
> Meggie, will play with the baby raccoons under their mama's watchful eye.
> Our coons are not rabid....The state keeps watch on that, and issues
> warnings when a rabies epidemic infests a population. They dart and test the
> coon population randomly all year long. The only thing I have to worry about
> is when large rogue males come to eat. This happens rarely, and my cats (I
> have 4 cats) are all too smart to mess with them when it does. But my cats
> are outside cats, and they face many hazards that inside cats don't have to
> worry about. Raccoons are just one of those hazards. I believe their freedom
> is worth the risk, and I treat them accordingly. Since the cats and raccoons
> don't have to compete for food, they seem to get along remarkably well. We
> also feed squirrels, birds, and an occasional 'possum....

My wife used to put out food for the foxes. This was in London which
some people may find surprising but apparently there are many in most
big cities. I don't know if it is the same in America ?

Anyway it just encourages them to scavenge more and they would sit out
on our front wall. The night before the refuse collection they would
rip the refuse bags to shreds.

--
Count Baldoni

William Graham
July 6th 07, 11:00 PM
"Baldoni @googlemail.com>" <baldoniXXV<nil> wrote in message
...
> William Graham wrote on 05/07/2007 :
>> "Moonlight Mile" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> X-No-Archive:
>>>
>>> In article >,
>>> Lynne > wrote:
>>>
>>>> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 14:36:29 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> > Look, I try to keep in mindthat the written word comes across with no
>>>> > facial expression, no tone, and it easy to misunderstand the emotion
>>>> > behind a post. You seem friendly enough most of the time, but because
>>>> > your post struck me as a little preachy, I'd like to clarify that I'm
>>>> > not an idiot, and my situation/environment is probably a little
>>>> > different than most.
>>>>
>>>> My post wasn't neccessarily directed at you, but at people in general
>>>> who
>>>> don't understand the bigger problem of feeding wildlife and
>>>> discouraging
>>>> them from their natural fear of humans. It ultimately leads to
>>>> wildlife
>>>> being killed all too often (for example, bears in Yosemite), and that
>>>> ****es me off royally.
>>>
>>> Do not feed the raccoons. I had been putting food out for stray cats. I
>>> won't be
>>> doing that anymore as I have been accused of "animal cruelty" for trying
>>> to find
>>> a way to deal with the large numbers of stray cats in my rural
>>> area--this is
>>> just background, i.e. I'm venting. The cats like to come by at night,
>>> but at
>>> night the raccoons and opossums eat _all_ the cat food that I put out.
>>> So I
>>> decided to just put cat food out during the day and early evening.
>>> Raccoons are
>>> "cute", but they are ravenous and will get into any food they can
>>> find--they can
>>> figure out latches. They will dig up the lawn under your bird feeder.
>>> They will,
>>> if they can reach the bird feeder and pull it down, break it open for
>>> the bird
>>> feed. I have shot a few raccoons (I'm not exactly proud of this) over
>>> the past
>>> 1-1/2 years since the raccoons started coming during the late evening or
>>> even
>>> during the day. Just when I thought I had gotten rid of all the coons in
>>> my
>>> area, several more come along to replace them. I nearly shot a mother
>>> coon until
>>> I saw the 5 or 6 quite small coons following her--my cruelty has limits.
>>> I no
>>> longer bother shooting the raccoons since all the strays I'd been
>>> feeding are
>>> gone by: getting shot as pests, starved or froze to death--last winter
>>> which was
>>> brutal in my area, were taken by predators, or moved on ( I prefer to
>>> think
>>> this). I kept putting food out all winter for them but they stopped
>>> coming when
>>> the weather turned very cold and the snow was deep in early to
>>> mid-January.
>>> Raccoons and opossums are not a problem in the colder part of winter
>>> since they
>>> hibernate, or something close to it.
>>>
>>> Aside from being destructive, I've been warned not to try to chase them
>>> off or
>>> kick one. They will turn on you, latch onto your leg and they don't let
>>> go. They
>>> can carry rabies, and if you see one around during the day (not at all
>>> normal
>>> behavior) there is a fair chance that that raccoon is rabid. If you have
>>> to
>>> shoot or club to death (people have had to do this) a suspected rabid
>>> raccoon,
>>> call the state police or Dept. of Environmental Conservation for
>>> cleanup. If you
>>> must club the raccoon to death in self-defense, you are exposing
>>> yourself to the
>>> raccoons bodily fluids blood, saliva, etc. Any animal (or person) not
>>> vaccinated
>>> that is exposed to the raccoon or it's blood is at risk of contracting
>>> rabies,
>>> so the raccoon must be tested and the carcass properly disposed of.
>>> Burning the
>>> carcass is not sufficient, I'm told.
>>>
>>> Rabies is almost always fatal. It must be treated as soon as possible if
>>> the
>>> raccoon tests positive or can't be found.
>>>
>>> Nature is often cruel,
>>> MM
>>
>> On the other hand.....
>>
>> I feed the raccoons that come up on my rear deck. I feed them dog food,
>> and always the cheapest brand (37-1/2 lb. bags of "Maintain") They don't
>> particularly like it, but if they are faced with starvation, then they
>> will eat it. And that's good, because I don't like to encourage them to
>> eat at my place. The raccoons and my cats have come to an understanding.
>> It consists mostly of not paying any attention to one another. Although
>> my sweetest cat, Meggie, will play with the baby raccoons under their
>> mama's watchful eye.
>> Our coons are not rabid....The state keeps watch on that, and issues
>> warnings when a rabies epidemic infests a population. They dart and test
>> the coon population randomly all year long. The only thing I have to
>> worry about is when large rogue males come to eat. This happens rarely,
>> and my cats (I have 4 cats) are all too smart to mess with them when it
>> does. But my cats are outside cats, and they face many hazards that
>> inside cats don't have to worry about. Raccoons are just one of those
>> hazards. I believe their freedom is worth the risk, and I treat them
>> accordingly. Since the cats and raccoons don't have to compete for food,
>> they seem to get along remarkably well. We also feed squirrels, birds,
>> and an occasional 'possum....
>
> My wife used to put out food for the foxes. This was in London which some
> people may find surprising but apparently there are many in most big
> cities. I don't know if it is the same in America ?
>
> Anyway it just encourages them to scavenge more and they would sit out on
> our front wall. The night before the refuse collection they would rip the
> refuse bags to shreds.
>
> --
> Count Baldoni
>
>
I haven't seen any foxes around where I am living now, but there used to be
a couple of families of them in the hills behind Stanford University where I
worked before I retired. I doubt if anyone fed them. If a fox come up on my
rear deck, they could eat the raccoon food, and I couldn't (and wouldn't) do
anything to stop it....I'll feed anything that is hungry enough to take the
risk. The only rules I have is that they don't kill each other. (especially
the cats) And, they all seem to understand that....So far, at least.

Ted Davis
July 7th 07, 02:56 AM
On Fri, 6 Jul 2007 15:00:16 -0700, "William Graham" >
wrote:

> The only rules I have is that they don't kill each other. (especially
>the cats) And, they all seem to understand that....So far, at least.

I just had an encounter with a coon a few minutes ago.

I leave the back door to the mud room open for a while each evening in
good weather so Spooky can go out for a while and get back in (he's
too old and feeble to be able to manage the leap to the cat flap
platform) and when I went to close it after my late supper (it was
still light out) there was a coon on the top step with his head
inside.

He vanished immediately, unlike the one a week ago Sunday when I
forgot to close the door until 11 PM - that one was munching away on
the cats' food, and when I appeared, instead of running outside, he
ran into a corner under the utility sink. I had thrown my back out
and was in no mood to get out my capture pole and drag him out, so I
just waited quietly in the kitchen. Instead of going out or resuming
feeding, he climbed up the window shelves. I opened the window
between the kitchen and mud room and zapped him with a slingshot and a
paint ball (a paint ball might make a mess if it hit the large and
expensive window, but it wouldn't break it. The coon then climbed on
top of the open door. I hit him again - no effect (the paint balls
didn't break - they just bounced off). So, I went to the open kitchen
door, took careful aim and *SPLAT* - right between the eyes. That was
one red faced coon, and he decided he really didn't belong there. He
climbed down, creeped around the edge of the door and took off like
his tail was on fire. Might have been the same one as tonight, but a
popular game trail runs from the woods on the west past my back door
to the field and pond to the east, so it might not have been the same
one.

--
T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real address - that one is dead

William Graham
July 8th 07, 12:01 AM
"Ted Davis" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 6 Jul 2007 15:00:16 -0700, "William Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>> The only rules I have is that they don't kill each other. (especially
>>the cats) And, they all seem to understand that....So far, at least.
>
> I just had an encounter with a coon a few minutes ago.
>
> I leave the back door to the mud room open for a while each evening in
> good weather so Spooky can go out for a while and get back in (he's
> too old and feeble to be able to manage the leap to the cat flap
> platform) and when I went to close it after my late supper (it was
> still light out) there was a coon on the top step with his head
> inside.
>
> He vanished immediately, unlike the one a week ago Sunday when I
> forgot to close the door until 11 PM - that one was munching away on
> the cats' food, and when I appeared, instead of running outside, he
> ran into a corner under the utility sink. I had thrown my back out
> and was in no mood to get out my capture pole and drag him out, so I
> just waited quietly in the kitchen. Instead of going out or resuming
> feeding, he climbed up the window shelves. I opened the window
> between the kitchen and mud room and zapped him with a slingshot and a
> paint ball (a paint ball might make a mess if it hit the large and
> expensive window, but it wouldn't break it. The coon then climbed on
> top of the open door. I hit him again - no effect (the paint balls
> didn't break - they just bounced off). So, I went to the open kitchen
> door, took careful aim and *SPLAT* - right between the eyes. That was
> one red faced coon, and he decided he really didn't belong there. He
> climbed down, creeped around the edge of the door and took off like
> his tail was on fire. Might have been the same one as tonight, but a
> popular game trail runs from the woods on the west past my back door
> to the field and pond to the east, so it might not have been the same
> one.
>
Coons are territorial, so the ones I have are the normal residents of the
area. They have become used to me and my, "rules" so they get along pretty
well.....If I don't leave out enough kibbles for them, they will come to our
bedroom cat door in the middle of the night and scratch at the flap and wake
us up. Then I get up and feed them. The other night one kept scratching at
the door even though there were plenty of kibbles....I finally figured out
that he was thirsty....(It hadn't rained here for over a week)....So I put
out a pan of water, and he was happy.....:^)