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Brucefan
June 29th 06, 01:15 PM
One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
decision for and it's torture.

Rachel
June 29th 06, 02:43 PM
Get a second opinion. My 18 year old cat has the same symptoms.
Through research I think it could be one of three things,
hyperthyroidism, diabetes, or kidney failure. I'm taking my cat in on
Satuday I'll let you know what I find out. To ease my cat's burdens
I've made a lower litter box without high sides out of a rubbermaid bin
top and put it and wet food on a dish each day in his favorite room. I
have also made sure there is plenty of water available and near by as
well. My cat seems a lot happier despite his symptoms.

Good Luck,
Rachel

Brucefan wrote:
> One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
> For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
> legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
> uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
> falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
> now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
> she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
> she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
> the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
> heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
> not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
> 6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.

Matthew
June 29th 06, 02:44 PM
Bruce this is a decision that all pet lovers never want to face. The only
thing I can say is you will know when it is time. This decision needs to be
based on facts not all emotions that may sound cold and cruel but you have
your loved one to think of. You need to think about the quality of her life
and how it has been affected and effected

To put your mind at ease you may want to go to another vet and make sure
there is nothing that you can do so there is no doubt.

This is going to be your hardest decision you have ever made but you have to
be strong and do the right thing. You will know when it is time to do what
is best there is no easy answer for this

Purrs and Hugs for you

"Brucefan" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
> For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
> legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
> uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
> falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
> now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
> she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
> she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
> the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
> heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
> not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
> 6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.
>

Toni
June 29th 06, 03:29 PM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
> We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.
>


It's a tough call and no matter what you decide you may always wonder if you
did the right thing. A percentage of pet owners wait too long IMO, and some
jump the gun too soon simply out of a need to have it be over. Neither type
owner can be too harshly judged IMO as both are feeling as they do out of
love.

Make a list of the things she loves most- looking out a favorite window,
sleeping in your lap, etc., and when she can no longer enjoy these things
then it is time IMO.

Since you wrote:

> She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared.
> The only time she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap.

I would guess her quality of life is beginning to wane. I suggest one more
veterinary visit to double/triple check that there is no pain management or
other treatments possible- this to assuage your guilt as much as anything
else. It is also a good time to talk over in office vs. at home euthanasia
so you understand what your options are.

Then take her home, watch her, and look deeply into her eyes when you talk
to her. She will tell you when she is ready to go.

A calm humane death (at home IMO) is the last great gift you will ever be
able to give her. It will be very difficult for you, but you have to set
your own feelings aside and think only about what is best for her. Be as
strong as you can be for the procedure- try and offer her loving support and
as calm a goodbye as you can muster.
Try and remember how much she gave you instead fo how much you are losing.

It is never easy.


--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

Buddy
June 29th 06, 03:56 PM
16 isn't that old. Please take your kitty back or to another vet and
make sure they test for hyperthyroidism. For some reason, they don't
look for this and it sounds like that is what your kitty has. It is
simple to treat and inexpensive. A blood test will give you the
results. I had a cat live to be over 20 who was diagnosed with
hyperthyroidism at age 18. Take your kitty back for another blood
test.

Toni wrote:
> "Brucefan" > wrote in message
> > We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> > down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> > her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> > put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> > think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> > Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> > decision for and it's torture.
> >
>
>
> It's a tough call and no matter what you decide you may always wonder if you
> did the right thing. A percentage of pet owners wait too long IMO, and some
> jump the gun too soon simply out of a need to have it be over. Neither type
> owner can be too harshly judged IMO as both are feeling as they do out of
> love.
>
> Make a list of the things she loves most- looking out a favorite window,
> sleeping in your lap, etc., and when she can no longer enjoy these things
> then it is time IMO.
>
> Since you wrote:
>
> > She cries all the time and
> > just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared.
> > The only time she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap.
>
> I would guess her quality of life is beginning to wane. I suggest one more
> veterinary visit to double/triple check that there is no pain management or
> other treatments possible- this to assuage your guilt as much as anything
> else. It is also a good time to talk over in office vs. at home euthanasia
> so you understand what your options are.
>
> Then take her home, watch her, and look deeply into her eyes when you talk
> to her. She will tell you when she is ready to go.
>
> A calm humane death (at home IMO) is the last great gift you will ever be
> able to give her. It will be very difficult for you, but you have to set
> your own feelings aside and think only about what is best for her. Be as
> strong as you can be for the procedure- try and offer her loving support and
> as calm a goodbye as you can muster.
> Try and remember how much she gave you instead fo how much you are losing.
>
> It is never easy.
>
>
> --
> Toni
> http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

-L.
June 29th 06, 05:00 PM
Brucefan wrote:
> One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
> For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
> legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
> uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
> falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
> now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
> she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
> she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
> the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
> heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
> not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
> 6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.

It is torture and my heart goes out to you. I made the decision just
over a year ago for my beloved old dog, Tosh. I still second-guess
myself. Here's a link that might help:
http://angelshavenhere.homestead.com/makingthedecision.html

-L.

Brucefan
June 29th 06, 05:41 PM
Well I appreciate the kind words and advice everyone's given me. I was
able to make an appt. for tonight at another vet so hopefully they can
give me a little more insight. I gotta figure if she's still drinking
and eating normally that it can't be too late to help her out. What's
making it worse is that my wife and I both work so I worry about her
during the day...will she fall down the stairs or fall off the chair
when we're not home and break her neck or something. We have 2 other
cats too and sometimes one of them beats her up...they used to play
with each other all the time and now he doesn't understand why she's
not so he tries to instigate her. Ugh...pets...gotta love em but this
part is so hard.

Also thanks for the tip on home euthanasia...I didn't know some vets
would do that. Seems like a much more humane way to do it...in an
environment they know and without any fear. (hopefully we're not at
that stage yet but it's good to know).

Buddy wrote:
> 16 isn't that old. Please take your kitty back or to another vet and
> make sure they test for hyperthyroidism. For some reason, they don't
> look for this and it sounds like that is what your kitty has. It is
> simple to treat and inexpensive. A blood test will give you the
> results. I had a cat live to be over 20 who was diagnosed with
> hyperthyroidism at age 18. Take your kitty back for another blood
> test.

Toni
June 29th 06, 05:51 PM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Also thanks for the tip on home euthanasia...I didn't know some vets
> would do that. Seems like a much more humane way to do it...in an
> environment they know and without any fear. (hopefully we're not at
> that stage yet but it's good to know).


Not all veterinarians will come to your home- some do, some don't.

My last euthanasia was this past October- the dog (an Irish Wolfhound) was
unable to walk, and too large to easily move, so I looked in the yellow
pages and found a mobile vet. He came once to look her over and get to know
us and our situation, and a couple of weeks later when it truly was time he
returned for the procedure. He was great- I can'rtsay enough about how well
he handled everything- very respectful of both the dog and our grief.

If you are really in the planning ahead stage it is worth asking if the
"come to your home" people will remove the remains for cremation or
disposal. In our case the dog was simply too large for him to handle and we
preferred to take her to the crematory ourselves anyway, but I have had
smaller pets taken away by the home vets for cremation/disposal.

Sorry to bring up such disturbing topics, but to me, planning ahead makes a
terrible task proceed somewhat smoother, and disposal is something not
everyone remembers to make plans for.

Best wishes...

--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

June 30th 06, 02:06 AM
Brucefan wrote:

> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.

Have had bloodwork done?

If not, I would do that immediately. THat will tell you fairly quickly
if there is something treatbale, or if it is beyond help.

Last year, Maynard seemed fine but suddenly had yellow ears, a very bad
sign. The day before, I ahad been planning a birthday party. I was
going to be at a cat show as a vendor on his 19th birthday, so I
figured I would have a cake with his photo and a little photo display.
I do photography, so it would be a cute way to get people over to look.


Then, I saw his ears. I took him to the vet the next morning. He was
still actibing fine, eating, drinking, etc. But I could tell by the way
the vets were talking, that this was much more serious, and that we
were mostly likely at the end of his life.

I did the bloodwork in the hopes that there really was an infection
that could be treated, and i started doing at-home sub-q injections to
see if that helped. But it was clear from the bloodwork results that
this was liver failure, and the best we could do was keep him
comfortable. After 2 days, he quit eating, and I knew he was ready to
go.

I took him in on the 3rd day. We don't have a vet that will come to the
house, but they did come out to the car, so I could stay there with him
on my lap, in privacy and love him up.

I know that I made an informed decision. I had the bloodowkr results
with liver values way off the charts. I knew it would only torture him
to try and do further treatment. And the bloodwork bought me 3 days to
love him up and make sure I was making a rational informed decision.

Even though I ended up losing him 3 days later, I believe it was money
well spent. I have also decided to do bloodwork more often with my
other pets. Kira is much younger, only 12, but as she is my stress
kitty, and acting older than she should, I will do hers more often.
Right now, she is acting healthy, and her results are good, so I will
do it every 6-8 months, rather than once a year. If she gives me reason
earlier, I will do it sooner. In a year or so, I will increase it to
every 4-6 months. I want the opportunity to treat things earlier.

T
June 30th 06, 03:47 AM
In article . com>,
says...
> One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
> For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
> legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
> uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
> falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
> now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
> she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
> she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
> the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
> heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
> not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
> 6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.

You're lucky to have a pragmatic vet. I've had to break mine in. After
the $1,300 I spent on Cosimo only to have to euthanize him I told the
vet that if they knew what was going on, why did we prolong his life?

My 16 year old is still active but he does sleep a lot more. He's right
next to me now. Still, he's definitely MY cat.

Ryan Robbins
June 30th 06, 04:30 AM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> One of our cats seems like she's going downhill....she's 16 years old.
> For the past 2 months or so, she has trouble walking around, her back
> legs just seem to give out and sometimes her head just starts twitching
> uncontrollably...then she'll howl and try to walk but just stumbles and
> falls. She can't scratch herself or she'll just fall over. Sometimes
> now when she goes to the litter box, we find her laying in it...like
> she's too tired after going to get out. She cries all the time and
> just seems miserable....sometimes she even seems scared. The only time
> she seems ok is when we just hold her in our lap. We've taken her to
> the vet...they did blood tests which looked ok but she does have a
> heart murmur...basically they just say "she's 16 years old...there's
> not much we can do without spending thousands to maybe prolong her life
> 6 months". We just don't know what to do....I'm not the type to put
> down a cat because it's convenient...but at the same time I don't want
> her to suffer because we feel guilty doing it. She still eats (if you
> put the bowl in front of her) and still drinks alot which makes me
> think she still wants to live. So how do you know when it's time?!
> Obviously this is the first pet I've ever had to make this type of
> decision for and it's torture.

Nobody here can give you the answer. You should schedule an appointment with
your cat's vet and discuss your cat's health with the vet. Remember that
euthanasia is permanent; you can't change your mind after the fact. When my
Sara was heading into her final days, I met with the vet for a half hour and
we reviewed Sara's chronic renal failure and the progression of the disease.
I fully expected to end up making that final appointment for Sara, and I
wouldn't have had doubted a suggestion that Sara's time had come. I showed
the vet photos I had taken in the previous year and asked what my options
were. We tried a cortisone and Vitamin B injection the next day, and Sara
perked up.

Sadly, Sara died nine days later at home. But she lived life to the fullest.

I'm not saying that I rejected euthanasia; I didn't. In fact, the day before
Sara died, I knew she was at the end. But the vet wasn't in that afternoon
when I called. Otherwise, I am sure, I would have had Sara put to sleep.

Things to consider are:

(1) Is my cat eating and drinking?

(2) Is my cat in control of her bowel movements and bladder? [Sometimes you
need to differentiate apparent incontinence from convenience: A cat may no
longer be able to step over the wall and into the litter box, so the cat
goes to the bathroom on the floor. The solution would be to put newspapers
down in that area or, better yet, make an improvised litter pan with shorter
walls.]

(3) Is my cat able to walk around on her own?

(4) Is my cat aware of her surroundings? Does she respond to patting,
talking, etc.?

(5) Is my cat in any noticeable pain, as opposed to general discomfort? Can
the pain be treated? Can the cause be treated?

Kitkat
June 30th 06, 01:55 PM
Brucefan wrote:
> Well, here's an update on the situation. I took her to the vet last
> night and it might've done more harm then good. He did blood work
> again (she had work done about 3 months ago when this started). This
> time he noticed that the blood sugar was extremely low...he gave us
> some cream to give her to raise it and also gave us phenobarbital to
> see if that helps with the twitching/seizure type occurances. Now for
> the bad news...when we were about to check out, she suddenly had a
> violent full blown seizure (not the little twitching we saw up to this
> point). The vet thought it was a combination of the low sugar and the
> stress of being at the vet. On the way home, she had another one in
> the car. Last night she didn't sleep a wink...walked around (barely
> walked...more like dragged herself around) disoriented crying all
> night, had alot of the little twitching seizures and had another full
> blown one at about 1am. We watched her all night (got about 1 hour of
> sleep). She's eating like a pig though and still drinking....she just
> isn't the same cat we brought to the vet...one of those seizures had to
> have done some damage. We're calling the vet back this morning and
> will see what his advice is but it doesn't look good from what I saw
> last night. I can't make a cat live like that if it continues.
>

I'm very sad to read this update and wish you the best, no matter what
happens. This has to be the worst part of being a pet parent. I do not
look forward to these kinds of decisions. Best of luck and lots of purrs
for you and kitty.

Pam

-L.
July 1st 06, 01:15 AM
Brucefan wrote:
> Well, here's an update on the situation. I took her to the vet last
> night and it might've done more harm then good. He did blood work
> again (she had work done about 3 months ago when this started). This
> time he noticed that the blood sugar was extremely low...he gave us
> some cream to give her to raise it and also gave us phenobarbital to
> see if that helps with the twitching/seizure type occurances. Now for
> the bad news...when we were about to check out, she suddenly had a
> violent full blown seizure (not the little twitching we saw up to this
> point). The vet thought it was a combination of the low sugar and the
> stress of being at the vet. On the way home, she had another one in
> the car. Last night she didn't sleep a wink...walked around (barely
> walked...more like dragged herself around) disoriented crying all
> night, had alot of the little twitching seizures and had another full
> blown one at about 1am. We watched her all night (got about 1 hour of
> sleep). She's eating like a pig though and still drinking....she just
> isn't the same cat we brought to the vet...one of those seizures had to
> have done some damage. We're calling the vet back this morning and
> will see what his advice is but it doesn't look good from what I saw
> last night. I can't make a cat live like that if it continues.

I'm really sorry to hear that. :( I hope she improved with a little
time.

-L.

lucy707 via CatKB.com
July 1st 06, 06:47 AM
Brucefan wrote:
>Well, here's an update on the situation. I took her to the vet last
>night and it might've done more harm then good. He did blood work
>again (she had work done about 3 months ago when this started). This
>time he noticed that the blood sugar was extremely low...he gave us
>some cream to give her to raise it and also gave us phenobarbital to
>see if that helps with the twitching/seizure type occurances. Now for
>the bad news...when we were about to check out, she suddenly had a
>violent full blown seizure (not the little twitching we saw up to this
>point). The vet thought it was a combination of the low sugar and the
>stress of being at the vet. On the way home, she had another one in
>the car. Last night she didn't sleep a wink...walked around (barely
>walked...more like dragged herself around) disoriented crying all
>night, had alot of the little twitching seizures and had another full
>blown one at about 1am. We watched her all night (got about 1 hour of
>sleep). She's eating like a pig though and still drinking....she just
>isn't the same cat we brought to the vet...one of those seizures had to
>have done some damage. We're calling the vet back this morning and
>will see what his advice is but it doesn't look good from what I saw
>last night. I can't make a cat live like that if it continues.

Oh my goodness. I am so sorry. I think you should do whatever you're gut
tells you to do. I am really sorry.

--
C

Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200607/1

Matthew
July 1st 06, 07:11 AM
Bruce it sounds like a reaction to the Phenobarbital. My rumble is allergic
to it and he had a bad reaction where he became lethargic, he tried to
scratch his face off where he scratched till the fur was gone and almost
down to the bone. He would walk around in circles when he did walk or he
would just lay in one spot and not be responsive to anything. He yowled
when he walked. He still was having seizures

We had to put him on diazepam( valium) for his epilepsy instead; but that
drugs needs serious monitoring of his kidneys and liver. Luckily he has been
seizure free for 3 years now and we are slowly weaning him off of it but
now he is diabetic and we are learning to deal with it. Today was his first
round of shots

A big hug and purrs for everyone

"Brucefan" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Well, here's an update on the situation. I took her to the vet last
> night and it might've done more harm then good. He did blood work
> again (she had work done about 3 months ago when this started). This
> time he noticed that the blood sugar was extremely low...he gave us
> some cream to give her to raise it and also gave us phenobarbital to
> see if that helps with the twitching/seizure type occurances. Now for
> the bad news...when we were about to check out, she suddenly had a
> violent full blown seizure (not the little twitching we saw up to this
> point). The vet thought it was a combination of the low sugar and the
> stress of being at the vet. On the way home, she had another one in
> the car. Last night she didn't sleep a wink...walked around (barely
> walked...more like dragged herself around) disoriented crying all
> night, had alot of the little twitching seizures and had another full
> blown one at about 1am. We watched her all night (got about 1 hour of
> sleep). She's eating like a pig though and still drinking....she just
> isn't the same cat we brought to the vet...one of those seizures had to
> have done some damage. We're calling the vet back this morning and
> will see what his advice is but it doesn't look good from what I saw
> last night. I can't make a cat live like that if it continues.
>

Brucefan
July 1st 06, 04:12 PM
Actually we hadn't given it to her yet. The vet wanted us to try the
Nutri-cal before giving her the phenobarbital. It wasn't until after
the 3rd seizure late that night that we gave her the pheno...didn't
seem to do much of anything. By yesterday evening, she couldn't even
get up, still twitching and crying whenever we'd put her on her feet,
just going to the bathroom wherever she laid. We brought her back in
last night and that was it....she's in a better place now. Now we
have to concentrate on spoiling our other 2 16 year old cats.

On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 06:11:47 GMT, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>Bruce it sounds like a reaction to the Phenobarbital.

Niel Humphreys
July 1st 06, 04:51 PM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
...
> Actually we hadn't given it to her yet. The vet wanted us to try the
> Nutri-cal before giving her the phenobarbital. It wasn't until after
> the 3rd seizure late that night that we gave her the pheno...didn't
> seem to do much of anything. By yesterday evening, she couldn't even
> get up, still twitching and crying whenever we'd put her on her feet,
> just going to the bathroom wherever she laid. We brought her back in
> last night and that was it....she's in a better place now.

My condolences. :(
--

Niel H

Toni
July 1st 06, 05:52 PM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
...
> By yesterday evening, she couldn't even
> get up, still twitching and crying whenever we'd put her on her feet,
> just going to the bathroom wherever she laid. We brought her back in
> last night and that was it....she's in a better place now. Now we
> have to concentrate on spoiling our other 2 16 year old cats.


Sorry to hear that- condolences to you and your family.


--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/rules.htm

T
July 1st 06, 06:39 PM
In article >,
says...
> Actually we hadn't given it to her yet. The vet wanted us to try the
> Nutri-cal before giving her the phenobarbital. It wasn't until after
> the 3rd seizure late that night that we gave her the pheno...didn't
> seem to do much of anything. By yesterday evening, she couldn't even
> get up, still twitching and crying whenever we'd put her on her feet,
> just going to the bathroom wherever she laid. We brought her back in
> last night and that was it....she's in a better place now. Now we
> have to concentrate on spoiling our other 2 16 year old cats.

Sorry for your loss. My condolences. They do become members of the
family don't they.

Brucefan
July 1st 06, 07:11 PM
Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time. What
really has me upset though are vets. This is the 2nd cat that was
misdiagnosed more then once which if diagnosed correctly earlier,
might survived a bit longer. How many freagin vets do you have to see
before you find a good one? Our other cat (who's thankfully still
alive) had a bump in it's tail...3 vets said to leave it and it was
nothing to worry about. It kept growing and it wasn't until the 4th
that they said it's probably cancer and remove the tail....turned out
it was cancer. By that time, who knows if it's spread (we removed the
tail about a month ago and he's doing fine so far). This cat if
diagnosed correctly with the low blood sugar by the 2 previous vets
could've either survived longer or had a better life up until last
night. By now though, after the seizures the damage was done and it
was too late.

Sorry for venting...I'm sure there are caring vets out there and I'm
sure it's a difficult job diagnosing an animal that can't give
feedback. It's just frustrating losing a pet due to a vet that just
doesn't take the time to look at all the possibilities and instead
just tells us "She's 16, she's getting old and will have problems".
2nd opinions are a must...but who knew you had to get 3 or 4 before
getitng the right one.

Annie Wxill
July 1st 06, 08:00 PM
"Brucefan" > wrote in message
...
> Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time.

Hello,
Condolences on the loss of your cat. No matter how long we have them, it's
not long enough.

Annie

Rhonda
July 2nd 06, 02:39 AM
I'm sorry to hear that it was time for your cat. Sounds like you did the
right thing. I hope she had a peaceful trip to the bridge.

As for finding a good vet, we found ours through an animal rescue
organization. Call some organizations in your area and see who they
like, or many times they have websites with recommendations. It's better
than hit and miss, which we've unfortunately gone through too.

Good luck,

Rhonda

Brucefan wrote:
> Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time. What
> really has me upset though are vets. This is the 2nd cat that was
> misdiagnosed more then once which if diagnosed correctly earlier,
> might survived a bit longer. How many freagin vets do you have to see
> before you find a good one? Our other cat (who's thankfully still
> alive) had a bump in it's tail...3 vets said to leave it and it was
> nothing to worry about. It kept growing and it wasn't until the 4th
> that they said it's probably cancer and remove the tail....turned out
> it was cancer. By that time, who knows if it's spread (we removed the
> tail about a month ago and he's doing fine so far). This cat if
> diagnosed correctly with the low blood sugar by the 2 previous vets
> could've either survived longer or had a better life up until last
> night. By now though, after the seizures the damage was done and it
> was too late.
>
> Sorry for venting...I'm sure there are caring vets out there and I'm
> sure it's a difficult job diagnosing an animal that can't give
> feedback. It's just frustrating losing a pet due to a vet that just
> doesn't take the time to look at all the possibilities and instead
> just tells us "She's 16, she's getting old and will have problems".
> 2nd opinions are a must...but who knew you had to get 3 or 4 before
> getitng the right one.

July 2nd 06, 09:43 AM
Brucefan wrote:
> Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time. What
> really has me upset though are vets. This is the 2nd cat that was
> misdiagnosed more then once which if diagnosed correctly earlier,
> might survived a bit longer. How many freagin vets do you have to see
> before you find a good one?

I'm really sorry to hear about your loss. We always know it is coming,
but it still hurts badly when the time comes.

I'm a bit curious. Did the first 3 vets not do a biospy of the bump on
the tail? When Maynard had a bump on his side (a squashy lump about
half the size of a grape), I took him in, expecting expensive tests.
The vet took a sample, looked at it under the microscope, and came back
with the happy diagnosis of a strangely located blob of fat. I was
fortunate, and he lived another 10 years. But I didn't have to ask. He
did the first view right there to rule out the need for expensive
tests. I'm surprised that the other vets didn't do go ahead and do any
tests to make sure.

If you have a local craigslist, I would recommend that you check out
their pets catagory and ask about good vets in your area. You might
find some good references there. Anytime somebody asks in my local
area, I recommend my vet. They are reasonably prices (the vet closest
to me is good, but extremely expensive since it is on the edge of an
expensive area). They have been great in the care of my cats and dogs.
They do not recommend unnecessary tests and have even told me when
something isn't needed when I thought it was. They were right that my
dog's large heart was healthy and just too big for her body. Not
enlarged from disease. I expected to do more expensive tests, and he
said to put her on a diet (the fat was taking up space, causing the
heart to push on the windpipe), and wait 6 months to do a new x-ray.
That was 9 years ago, and she is doing great. We just have to keep her
on the special diet.

T
July 2nd 06, 05:03 PM
In article >,
says...
> Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time. What
> really has me upset though are vets. This is the 2nd cat that was
> misdiagnosed more then once which if diagnosed correctly earlier,
> might survived a bit longer. How many freagin vets do you have to see
> before you find a good one? Our other cat (who's thankfully still
> alive) had a bump in it's tail...3 vets said to leave it and it was
> nothing to worry about. It kept growing and it wasn't until the 4th
> that they said it's probably cancer and remove the tail....turned out
> it was cancer. By that time, who knows if it's spread (we removed the
> tail about a month ago and he's doing fine so far). This cat if
> diagnosed correctly with the low blood sugar by the 2 previous vets
> could've either survived longer or had a better life up until last
> night. By now though, after the seizures the damage was done and it
> was too late.
>
> Sorry for venting...I'm sure there are caring vets out there and I'm
> sure it's a difficult job diagnosing an animal that can't give
> feedback. It's just frustrating losing a pet due to a vet that just
> doesn't take the time to look at all the possibilities and instead
> just tells us "She's 16, she's getting old and will have problems".
> 2nd opinions are a must...but who knew you had to get 3 or 4 before
> getitng the right one.
>

That's the reason medical practice, be it veterinary or M.D. is called
and art. The science is far removed, and the average vet or M.D. can't
possibly know everything.

We just have to be proactive.

Brucefan
July 2nd 06, 06:45 PM
The first visit, they did extract something with a needle. He said it
was similar to a biopsy but not a biopsy...for the life of me I can't
recall what the test was. Anyway, he called the next day and it came
up as not being cancer. Then when the bump doubled and tripled in
size...we kept bringing him back (to the original vet as well as 2
different ones)...since the original test showed negative on
cancer...they kept saying wait until it gets to be painful and then
it'll be removed...they didn't want to risk putting a 16 year old cat
under. Well we didn't find out until the 4th vet that the original
test wasn't as accurate as a biopsy...she looked at the lump and said
she'd be shocked if it wasn't cancer and to have the tail amputated as
soon as possible. Turns out she was right. Now I don't know if it
became cancerous or if they missed the cancer cells on the original
test but if we knew that there was still a possibility of it being
cancer we would've amputated a long time ago...but we were led to
believe it absolutely wasn't cancerous.



On 2 Jul 2006 01:43:42 -0700, "
> wrote:

>I'm a bit curious. Did the first 3 vets not do a biospy of the bump on
>the tail?

sax_playa86
July 2nd 06, 08:33 PM
My heart goes out to you. They really are part of the family, and it
never is easy when one passes on. I went through a very similar problem
with my last cat, Spook, at 15 he started having problems and the vet
couldn't tell us much. Eventually one vet was able to show us a
cancerous tumour. He lived awhile longer, until the cancer was too much
and we could tell that he was in too much pain for us just to leave him
there. He still lives in my heart, and always will...

Britt


T wrote:
> In article >,
> says...
> > Thanks everyone....it's been tough...16 years is a long time. What
> > really has me upset though are vets. This is the 2nd cat that was
> > misdiagnosed more then once which if diagnosed correctly earlier,
> > might survived a bit longer. How many freagin vets do you have to see
> > before you find a good one? Our other cat (who's thankfully still
> > alive) had a bump in it's tail...3 vets said to leave it and it was
> > nothing to worry about. It kept growing and it wasn't until the 4th
> > that they said it's probably cancer and remove the tail....turned out
> > it was cancer. By that time, who knows if it's spread (we removed the
> > tail about a month ago and he's doing fine so far). This cat if
> > diagnosed correctly with the low blood sugar by the 2 previous vets
> > could've either survived longer or had a better life up until last
> > night. By now though, after the seizures the damage was done and it
> > was too late.
> >
> > Sorry for venting...I'm sure there are caring vets out there and I'm
> > sure it's a difficult job diagnosing an animal that can't give
> > feedback. It's just frustrating losing a pet due to a vet that just
> > doesn't take the time to look at all the possibilities and instead
> > just tells us "She's 16, she's getting old and will have problems".
> > 2nd opinions are a must...but who knew you had to get 3 or 4 before
> > getitng the right one.
> >
>
> That's the reason medical practice, be it veterinary or M.D. is called
> and art. The science is far removed, and the average vet or M.D. can't
> possibly know everything.
>
> We just have to be proactive.