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Richard Arnopolin
June 29th 06, 03:19 PM
Here's the deal:
Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo) male
from cancer/kidney shut down.
I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
males.
Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
cat/kitten this weekend.
My questions:
Do two females peacefully share the same household?
Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.

My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
together before the introduction of Willow.

Tia,
Rick

Buddy
June 29th 06, 03:52 PM
I don't think two females will work. They are more territorial than
males, I think.

Richard Arnopolin wrote:
> Here's the deal:
> Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo) male
> from cancer/kidney shut down.
> I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
> about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
> Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
> males.
> Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
> cat/kitten this weekend.
> My questions:
> Do two females peacefully share the same household?
> Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
> I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.
>
> My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
> Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
> together before the introduction of Willow.
>
> Tia,
> Rick

-L.
June 29th 06, 05:02 PM
Richard Arnopolin wrote:
> Here's the deal:
> Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo) male
> from cancer/kidney shut down.
> I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
> about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
> Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
> males.
> Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
> cat/kitten this weekend.
> My questions:
> Do two females peacefully share the same household?
> Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
> I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.
>
> My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
> Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
> together before the introduction of Willow.
>
> Tia,
> Rick

Depends on the cats and the household. Personally, I'd adopt a younger
male in that situation. A Male will be less of a threat to your
female.

-L.

eabrennan@hotmail.com
June 29th 06, 06:27 PM
> Depends on the cats and the household. Personally, I'd adopt a younger
> male in that situation. A Male will be less of a threat to your
> female.
>
> -L.

We have two older (spayed) females -- 12-13 years old, always been
together, adopted by us when they were about 4. They don't even get
along all that well with each other! Last Sat. in the wee hours of the
morning, my son brought home a lovely young male stray whom he found in
a busy street. We made a temporary home for him on our enclosed porch.
By Sat morning proper we had checked the shelters registering him as a
found cat and we decided to keep the new kitty (about 9 months old and
intact) if no one called to claim him. Several days later (after vet
checkup, shots & Advantage) we let him meet the "girls". One ignored
him and he ignored her. The other one began vocalizations (which I
think she meant as growling) whenever he came into the room she was in
and he immediately began to vocalize back and urine spraying (leading
my to think he interpreted her vocalizations as "calling").

Currently, he is recovering from his neutering operation (Tuesday) at
my mom's house and we will try to reintroduce him to the girls in a
week or two. Hopefully his hormones will be down and he will stop the
spraying -- and I suppose a handy water bottle will help the female
learn to stop the vocalizations!

Does anyone have any suggestions on how to successfully integrate him
into our household? The female will be going for dental surgery next
Thursday, and I was considering moving the young male into the
household and sending her back to my mom's for a few days of recovery.
Then bringing her home after he's a bit more comfortable in our house.
BTW, she thinks she's the alpha female in the house.

Wendy
June 29th 06, 06:40 PM
"Richard Arnopolin" > wrote in message
...
> Here's the deal:
> Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo)
> male from cancer/kidney shut down.
> I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
> about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
> Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
> males.
> Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
> cat/kitten this weekend.
> My questions:
> Do two females peacefully share the same household?
> Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
> I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.
>
> My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
> Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
> together before the introduction of Willow.
>
> Tia,
> Rick
>

I think I'd try a male or a laid back female kitten.

My Tigger was the queen of the house. She had always lived with a companion
male. When I brought Isabelle in (she was 3 yr. old) it was hate at first
sight. They came to an agreement over time and pretty much ignored each
other. I swear Isabelle sang hi, ho the witch is dead when Tigger passed and
now she is the queen of the house. Isabelle gets along just fine with both
of my boys but they were just tiny kittens when she first laid eyes on them.

health4hire@comcast.net
June 29th 06, 07:10 PM
Hi eabren,

When I have had to introduce a new cat into my household, i keep the
new cat isolated in a room with its own food, water, and litterbox for
about a week. The resident cats can get used to the smell of the new
cat without everyone getting traumatized by an intruder. The hissing
eventually slows down and they may even begin to play under the door.

Then, I bring the new cat out and hold it so the resident cats can see
it and smell it. Once the hissing slows down, I allow the new cat to be
on the floor and wander, but only if I'm supervising. After several of
these exposures, the cats settle into a truce and form new alliances
that include the newcomer.

Although this process takes time, it is much less stressful on
everyone! Wendy

wrote:
> > Depends on the cats and the household. Personally, I'd adopt a younger
> > male in that situation. A Male will be less of a threat to your
> > female.
> >
> > -L.
>
> We have two older (spayed) females -- 12-13 years old, always been
> together, adopted by us when they were about 4. They don't even get
> along all that well with each other! Last Sat. in the wee hours of the
> morning, my son brought home a lovely young male stray whom he found in
> a busy street. We made a temporary home for him on our enclosed porch.
> By Sat morning proper we had checked the shelters registering him as a
> found cat and we decided to keep the new kitty (about 9 months old and
> intact) if no one called to claim him. Several days later (after vet
> checkup, shots & Advantage) we let him meet the "girls". One ignored
> him and he ignored her. The other one began vocalizations (which I
> think she meant as growling) whenever he came into the room she was in
> and he immediately began to vocalize back and urine spraying (leading
> my to think he interpreted her vocalizations as "calling").
>
> Currently, he is recovering from his neutering operation (Tuesday) at
> my mom's house and we will try to reintroduce him to the girls in a
> week or two. Hopefully his hormones will be down and he will stop the
> spraying -- and I suppose a handy water bottle will help the female
> learn to stop the vocalizations!
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions on how to successfully integrate him
> into our household? The female will be going for dental surgery next
> Thursday, and I was considering moving the young male into the
> household and sending her back to my mom's for a few days of recovery.
> Then bringing her home after he's a bit more comfortable in our house.
> BTW, she thinks she's the alpha female in the house.

Alison
June 29th 06, 10:52 PM
There's info on this link on how to introduce cats
http://messybeast.com/first-impressions.htm

Also, Pam Johnson- Bennet has written a book Cat V Cat which is worth
reading.
She is upset and angry at a strange cat on her territory and spraying
with water her
will make her feel worse and she will connect the punishment to the new
cat.
Its not a good idea to hold a cat while introducing them. It could panic
and scratch you badly.

--
Alison
http://catinfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
http://doginfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/


> wrote in message
oups.com...
> > > > -L.
>
> We have two older (spayed) females -- 12-13 years old, always been
> together, adopted by us when they were about 4. They don't even get
> along all that well with each other! Last Sat. in the wee hours of the
> morning, my son brought home a lovely young male stray whom he found in
> a busy street. We made a temporary home for him on our enclosed porch.
> By Sat morning proper we had checked the shelters registering him as a
> found cat and we decided to keep the new kitty (about 9 months old and
> intact) if no one called to claim him. Several days later (after vet
> checkup, shots & Advantage) we let him meet the "girls". One ignored
> him and he ignored her. The other one began vocalizations (which I
> think she meant as growling) whenever he came into the room she was in
> and he immediately began to vocalize back and urine spraying (leading
> my to think he interpreted her vocalizations as "calling").
>
> Currently, he is recovering from his neutering operation (Tuesday) at
> my mom's house and we will try to reintroduce him to the girls in a
> week or two. Hopefully his hormones will be down and he will stop the
> spraying -- and I suppose a handy water bottle will help the female
> learn to stop the vocalizations!
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions on how to successfully integrate him
> into our household? The female will be going for dental surgery next
> Thursday, and I was considering moving the young male into the
> household and sending her back to my mom's for a few days of recovery.
> Then bringing her home after he's a bit more comfortable in our house.
> BTW, she thinks she's the alpha female in the house.
>

T
June 30th 06, 03:55 AM
In article >,
says...
> Here's the deal:
> Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo) male
> from cancer/kidney shut down.
> I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
> about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
> Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
> males.
> Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
> cat/kitten this weekend.
> My questions:
> Do two females peacefully share the same household?
> Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
> I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.
>
> My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
> Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
> together before the introduction of Willow.
>
> Tia,
> Rick
>
>
>

I have the very same question. We had two males and one female.

Emily is the bitch who has a house to run, no doubt about it.

When we had to put Cosimo down her whole demeanor changed. She's much
closer to Randy now. But Keyron has pretty much said we shouldn't get
another female kitten or cat.

So I'd be interested to see the answer.

starphanie77 via CatKB.com
June 30th 06, 05:01 AM
I have had to introduce 2 new female cats into my home...it did take time and
much patience, but both times they have ended up great friends. Of course
mine have both been kittens...

Richard Arnopolin wrote:
>Here's the deal:
>Our family recently suffered a loss with the death of my eldest (16 yo) male
>from cancer/kidney shut down.
>I have two other cats; a dsh male (8 yo) who has been totally blind for
>about 1 year, and a female (2-1/2 yo) dsh.
>Even before our loss Willow (female) claimed dominance over the other two
>males.
>Its been about a month since we put Ebony down and I want to adopt another
>cat/kitten this weekend.
>My questions:
>Do two females peacefully share the same household?
>Also, will it matter if the new female has produced any liters?
>I will of course, spay or neuter the new adoptee when its old enough.
>
>My inquiry doesn't really concern the possiblity of two males.
>Ebony and Sander were not really buddies, but they occasionally played
>together before the introduction of Willow.
>
>Tia,
>Rick

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

tracyrose@gmail.com
June 30th 06, 07:24 AM
My opinion: people often exaggerate the difficulty of introducing adult
female cats. I have three - the 1st came at 6 months - the other two
were introduced sequentially at two years old. They all get along fine
- one introduction was a litle difficult for a while - the other went
smooth as silk. Look at the personalities, not the gender. And
remember, not all 8 year old cats want to be tortured by a kitten :>

Gail Futoran
June 30th 06, 04:41 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> My opinion: people often exaggerate the difficulty of introducing adult
> female cats. I have three - the 1st came at 6 months - the other two
> were introduced sequentially at two years old. They all get along fine
> - one introduction was a litle difficult for a while - the other went
> smooth as silk. Look at the personalities, not the gender. And
> remember, not all 8 year old cats want to be tortured by a kitten :>

I recently (December) introduced a female stray
(about a year old) to my three 6 year old females
(all spayed). Fortunately I have an "isolation"
room so that helped the transition. The stray still
tends to hide under the bed at night or when
threatened, but she's doing ok. One of the other
cats tolerates her best - they can play a foot from
each other - the other two simply tolerate her. I
don't expect any cuddling but relative peace
is fine. :)

Gail F.
Possession of: Lao Ma, Ephiny, Minya, Melosa