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July 3rd 06, 09:03 PM
I've got a ten year old male cat who is suffering from increasing
breathing issues (wheezing). Physical symptoms are excessive salivation
and a swollen larynx. The vet couldn't come up with anything wrong with
him. No foreign bodies (x-rays), no cysts (endoscopic exam), clean
blood and urine values. Finally, with pretty much everything else ruled
out, she is concerned that the cause may be a pharyngeal mucocele and
indicated that the removal of the salivary glands may be the only
solution. She is not recommending the surgery as he has learned to
avoid the triggers of the air construction during the last four months.
He's changed his sleeping spots and adjusted his sleeping position to
avoid the dyspnea and he avoids anything that causes him to purr,
including all human interaction (he used to be a very affectionate
cat). But besides missing the affection, it's hard for me to see him
sleeping holding his head upright most of the time, he just doesn't
look comfortable, and he's pretty much lost his energy. I'd like to
find out more about the surgery if anyone knows something about this.
How complicated is it (it sounds like major surgery to me), how are the
success chances? Thanks!

JJ
July 4th 06, 12:29 AM
I am NOT a Vet and would not even want to pretend I know much but...

I had a friend who had a cat with asthma and wheezing - and it turned
out to be Hemobartonella...after the treatment was completed -
apparently the cat is much better -

I bet your Vet already checked for this - but if not - you might
consider mentioning this anyway...

Good luck,Jen


wrote:
> I've got a ten year old male cat who is suffering from increasing
> breathing issues (wheezing). Physical symptoms are excessive salivation
> and a swollen larynx. The vet couldn't come up with anything wrong with
> him. No foreign bodies (x-rays), no cysts (endoscopic exam), clean
> blood and urine values. Finally, with pretty much everything else ruled
> out, she is concerned that the cause may be a pharyngeal mucocele and
> indicated that the removal of the salivary glands may be the only
> solution. She is not recommending the surgery as he has learned to
> avoid the triggers of the air construction during the last four months.
> He's changed his sleeping spots and adjusted his sleeping position to
> avoid the dyspnea and he avoids anything that causes him to purr,
> including all human interaction (he used to be a very affectionate
> cat). But besides missing the affection, it's hard for me to see him
> sleeping holding his head upright most of the time, he just doesn't
> look comfortable, and he's pretty much lost his energy. I'd like to
> find out more about the surgery if anyone knows something about this.
> How complicated is it (it sounds like major surgery to me), how are the
> success chances? Thanks!

Dale Atkin
July 11th 06, 02:38 AM
First the preface...

I am not a vet. I have never witnessed this surgery, not have I known any
cat with this problem who has had to have this surgery, my information comes
from a vertebrate zoology lab in which I disected a cat. Further with the
cat I did disect, I never successfully completely isolated the salivary
glands, as my specimen had a huge growth right over top of them (otherwise
I'd send you a picture of them). I did get a good look at them though in the
TA cat.

The mandibular and the sublingual glands are located fairly superficially,
deep to the skin (obviously) and a couple of veins. They are located very
roughly where the lower jaw makes contact with the rest of the skull. They
are also located right next to each other physically.

So... I wouldn't imagine that the surgery would be overly invasive.
Obviously have to shave the area. Obviously involve an anesthetic (which
might have some extra risks associated with it due to the age of the cat).

As far as success chances, well do you mean success in removing the glands?
I'd imagine that would be pretty much a given. The risks would be the same
associated with any surgery (anesthetic, post surgery care etc). As far as
dealing with all the symptoms, who knows? Not me that's for darn sure.

Hope that helps a bit.

Dale

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've got a ten year old male cat who is suffering from increasing
> breathing issues (wheezing). Physical symptoms are excessive salivation
> and a swollen larynx. The vet couldn't come up with anything wrong with
> him. No foreign bodies (x-rays), no cysts (endoscopic exam), clean
> blood and urine values. Finally, with pretty much everything else ruled
> out, she is concerned that the cause may be a pharyngeal mucocele and
> indicated that the removal of the salivary glands may be the only
> solution. She is not recommending the surgery as he has learned to
> avoid the triggers of the air construction during the last four months.
> He's changed his sleeping spots and adjusted his sleeping position to
> avoid the dyspnea and he avoids anything that causes him to purr,
> including all human interaction (he used to be a very affectionate
> cat). But besides missing the affection, it's hard for me to see him
> sleeping holding his head upright most of the time, he just doesn't
> look comfortable, and he's pretty much lost his energy. I'd like to
> find out more about the surgery if anyone knows something about this.
> How complicated is it (it sounds like major surgery to me), how are the
> success chances? Thanks!
>