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View Full Version : Putting an "inside" car outside


123456789
July 7th 06, 04:10 PM
I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was just
a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.

Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the litter
box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My wife
always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and not
letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping adventure was
the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a 14 month old and
she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking around the house through
cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:

1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.

2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
and carps in the house.

3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.

I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years (six
foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out in the
dog house for the most part.

I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted to
know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to outdoor
life?

Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
appreciated.

Gail
July 7th 06, 04:58 PM
He might do well in an indoor home where he is the only cat. Do you know
someone who might take him and provide him with a good home? Also, for 3
indoor cats you need 4 litter boxes. They should have no scent scoopable
litter and no hoods on them. Do you have this in your home?
Gail
"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was just
>a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>
> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and
> not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a
> 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:
>
> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.
>
> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
> and carps in the house.
>
> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>
> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out
> in the dog house for the most part.
>
> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to outdoor
> life?
>
> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
> appreciated.

123456789
July 7th 06, 05:15 PM
I have had these three cats for over six years and they have done just fine
with 2 litter boxes with no hoods, so I don't think that is the issue.
Unfortunately, I don't know anyone that would be willing to take hi in.


"Gail" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> He might do well in an indoor home where he is the only cat. Do you know
> someone who might take him and provide him with a good home? Also, for 3
> indoor cats you need 4 litter boxes. They should have no scent scoopable
> litter and no hoods on them. Do you have this in your home?
> Gail
> "123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was
>>just a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>>
>> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
>> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
>> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and
>> not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
>> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a
>> 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
>> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:
>>
>> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.
>>
>> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
>> and carps in the house.
>>
>> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>>
>> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
>> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out
>> in the dog house for the most part.
>>
>> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
>> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to
>> outdoor life?
>>
>> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
>> appreciated.
>
>

July 7th 06, 05:36 PM
123456789 wrote:

> I have had these three cats for over six years and they have done just fine
> with 2 litter boxes with no hoods, so I don't think that is the issue.
> Unfortunately, I don't know anyone that would be willing to take hi in.

I had three cats for several years who did fine on two litterboxes. One
day a tomcat started hanging around my house, consequently one of my
own cats started marking, primarily urinating. I cleaned the spots
where he urinated thoroughly, put out two more boxes in a different
room and made sure to pay a lot of attention to him. His behavior
stopped within about two weeks. After a week months, I managed to trap
the tomcat and get him neutered. He consequently was never seen at my
house any more (he is still hanging around the neighborhood). Once he
disappeared, I reverted back to two boxes and things are fine. I was
lucky in so far as the trigger for the behavior was easy to define.

I wouldn't recommend keeping your cat outside after he's been indoor
only for six years. He's not used to it and it's just not fair to
deprive him of the companionship and attention. Try adding litterboxes
in another area of the house (the other cats may pick on him and
prevent him going to the current boxes), and/or try to find him a new
home as a single cat. You may want to keep him in a room on his own
overnight to reduce the stress on everyone in the home until you can
find him a home (or until he curbs his behavior!). If he is very
overweight, his obesity may actually be part of the problem. Separating
him at night will make it easier to put him on a diet if he only has
access to his food overnight.

RobZip
July 7th 06, 06:12 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> 123456789 wrote:
>
>> I have had these three cats for over six years and they have done just
>> fine
>> with 2 litter boxes with no hoods, so I don't think that is the issue.
>> Unfortunately, I don't know anyone that would be willing to take hi in.
>
> I had three cats for several years who did fine on two litterboxes. One
> day a tomcat started hanging around my house, consequently one of my
> own cats started marking, primarily urinating.

> After a week months, I managed to trap
> the tomcat and get him neutered. He consequently was never seen at my
> house any more (he is still hanging around the neighborhood).

Just putting out a feeler on this subject and similar soultions to problem
animals......

When I lived in Florida, a dog in the neighborhood was quite a pain in the
ass with its incessant barking over nothing. The dog was left outside for
about 18 hours a day and sometimes for a few days at a time. It disappeared
one day. A few days later it showed up back on the chain in its own yard.
There was a small shaved spot on its throat. Someone had taken the dog to a
vet and had its vocal cords clipped - surgical debarking. Since this was on
the other side of the block from me, I'm not fully informed about how much
opportunity the offended neighbors gave the owner of the dog to correct the
situation.

Question - do the majority of people here feel it permissable to subject a
nuisance animal that does not belong to them to surgical remedy strictly for
their own convenience? I do make the distinction between a cat being
neutered to stop unwanted behavior and the more unconventional approach to
dealing with a barking dog - again to stop unwanted behavior. How far is
going too far? Although the disruption of the barking dog was minimal to me,
I honestly have to say that I didn't miss hearing it bark.

Ryan Robbins
July 7th 06, 06:50 PM
"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]

> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
> appreciated.

This sounds like a troll. I wouldn't respond.

123456789
July 8th 06, 01:46 AM
He spent the day outside with no problem today. He even seemed to enjoy it,
running all over the yard and then hanging out in the dog house.

"He's not used to it and it's just not fair to
deprive him of the companionship and attention"

As for that, Squikie was always the most unaffectionate cat I have ever
seen. I would never come and sit with us, never liked to be pet and never
was all that friendly. Maybe my wife was right when she told me that he was
always meant to be an outside cat.




> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> 123456789 wrote:
>
>> I have had these three cats for over six years and they have done just
>> fine
>> with 2 litter boxes with no hoods, so I don't think that is the issue.
>> Unfortunately, I don't know anyone that would be willing to take hi in.
>
> I had three cats for several years who did fine on two litterboxes. One
> day a tomcat started hanging around my house, consequently one of my
> own cats started marking, primarily urinating. I cleaned the spots
> where he urinated thoroughly, put out two more boxes in a different
> room and made sure to pay a lot of attention to him. His behavior
> stopped within about two weeks. After a week months, I managed to trap
> the tomcat and get him neutered. He consequently was never seen at my
> house any more (he is still hanging around the neighborhood). Once he
> disappeared, I reverted back to two boxes and things are fine. I was
> lucky in so far as the trigger for the behavior was easy to define.
>
> I wouldn't recommend keeping your cat outside after he's been indoor
> only for six years. He's not used to it and it's just not fair to
> deprive him of the companionship and attention. Try adding litterboxes
> in another area of the house (the other cats may pick on him and
> prevent him going to the current boxes), and/or try to find him a new
> home as a single cat. You may want to keep him in a room on his own
> overnight to reduce the stress on everyone in the home until you can
> find him a home (or until he curbs his behavior!). If he is very
> overweight, his obesity may actually be part of the problem. Separating
> him at night will make it easier to put him on a diet if he only has
> access to his food overnight.
>

123456789
July 8th 06, 03:08 AM
After having him out there for a day, I decided that I could not bear to
keep my fat guy out there like that, so I brought him back in and my wife
and I will work it out.


"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was just
>a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>
> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and
> not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a
> 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:
>
> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.
>
> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
> and carps in the house.
>
> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>
> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out
> in the dog house for the most part.
>
> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to outdoor
> life?
>
> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
> appreciated.

Gail
July 8th 06, 03:46 AM
Please make sure you add another litter box and place in somewhere else in
the house. What was sufficient before may not be now (regarding the two
litter boxes). You can also try retraining him with the litter box. Restrict
him to one room with litter box, food, water, and a bed. Make sure the food
and water is away from the box. Gradually, as he uses the box, you can
increase the area he is allowed in. A third option is to have him see a vet
and to start him on an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication. This
often helps for litter box problems.
Gail
"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> After having him out there for a day, I decided that I could not bear to
> keep my fat guy out there like that, so I brought him back in and my wife
> and I will work it out.
>
>
> "123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was
>>just a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>>
>> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
>> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
>> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and
>> not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
>> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a
>> 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
>> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:
>>
>> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.
>>
>> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
>> and carps in the house.
>>
>> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>>
>> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
>> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out
>> in the dog house for the most part.
>>
>> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
>> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to
>> outdoor life?
>>
>> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
>> appreciated.
>

cybercat
July 8th 06, 03:49 AM
"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> After having him out there for a day, I decided that I could not bear to
> keep my fat guy out there like that, so I brought him back in and my wife
> and I will work it out.
>

I feel so relieved. Good for you. You are a good person.

123456789
July 8th 06, 04:16 AM
I wish I could put another box, but even though I have a nice size home, I
am limited as to where I can put the boxes, and thus can not add one.


"Gail" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> Please make sure you add another litter box and place in somewhere else in
> the house. What was sufficient before may not be now (regarding the two
> litter boxes). You can also try retraining him with the litter box.
> Restrict him to one room with litter box, food, water, and a bed. Make
> sure the food and water is away from the box. Gradually, as he uses the
> box, you can increase the area he is allowed in. A third option is to have
> him see a vet and to start him on an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety
> medication. This often helps for litter box problems.
> Gail
> "123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>> After having him out there for a day, I decided that I could not bear to
>> keep my fat guy out there like that, so I brought him back in and my wife
>> and I will work it out.
>>
>>
>> "123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>>>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was
>>>just a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>>>
>>> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
>>> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
>>> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him
>>> and not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
>>> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have
>>> a 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
>>> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three
>>> options:
>>>
>>> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to
>>> do.
>>>
>>> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that
>>> ****es and carps in the house.
>>>
>>> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>>>
>>> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
>>> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging
>>> out in the dog house for the most part.
>>>
>>> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
>>> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to
>>> outdoor life?
>>>
>>> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
>>> appreciated.
>>
>
>

July 8th 06, 11:05 AM
123456789 wrote:
> I wish I could put another box, but even though I have a nice size home, I
> am limited as to where I can put the boxes, and thus can not add one.
>

We didn't have any good place to put a box upstairs (that was also out
of reach of the dogs, so we put the box in the bathtub for a few
months. We had to move it to take a shower, but it wasn't that bad.

Later, I bought a jumbo crate and put the box inside the crate.The cats
can jump in and out, but the dogs can't get into the litter. It sits in
the bathroom, mostly under the cabinet.

We're happy, and the cats are happy.

Even if it is just a cloest or bathroom, there are places you can put
one. Or find a corner of a room and set up a little portable wall to
close it off.

angel
July 8th 06, 11:40 AM
123456789 wrote:
> I wish I could put another box, but even though I have a nice size home, I
> am limited as to where I can put the boxes, and thus can not add one.

well you know litter box is just a box

any container can be a litter box, I took an old plastic storage
hamper, a long square one.
I cut a 5" - 6" notch on the long side of it..(for easy entry) but the
walls are about 2' high or so... i could always put the lid back on
it... but I dont

my cats love it..

I don't blame you for wanting him inside

I have a feeling this may be your fat buddies protest for your newest
fling (your child)

this may be his way of getting attention
what do you think

since you have a fairly large home, maybe you could put fat-boy in a
certain room as a mild discipline when he craps on the floor in
general.. or carry some cat litter around in your pocket, when you
catch him squatting pepper him with a handful of litter, just kidding.
If he's jealous just getting attention, he will outgro it

you know children will put everything in their mouth, you may notice
your cat only poops just after eating, maybe you will have to put him
in a room with a litter box when you feed him.. then let him out after
an hour... I bet if you fed him a room with the door closed
I bet he would go in the litter box... any box can be a litter box

angel
July 8th 06, 11:43 AM
123456789 wrote:
> I wish I could put another box, but even though I have a nice size home, I
> am limited as to where I can put the boxes, and thus can not add one.

since he's fat, you might even think about, tightening his ass up with
a little less food

that would be your response to him crapping on the floor

see.. if you didn't feed him he wouldn't crap anywhere... so ultimately
you are the source of the crap, lol...

of course feed him enough to stay healthy, but... if he could stand to
lose a few pounds?

I think I would let him miss the next meal after crapping in the
floor...

nothing, I mean nothing gets in the way of a cat and their food... they
luuuuuv to eat
this might cure him instantly too

he won't die, he's got plenty of fat to live off of if he skips one or
every meal.. following a crapping... i guarantee! he will make the
connection veryquick

cybercat
July 8th 06, 05:36 PM
"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>
> I have a feeling this may be your fat buddies protest for your newest
> fling (your child)
>
> this may be his way of getting attention
> what do you think
>

This is exactly what I thought of. I have heard lots of stories about cats
starting to poop and pee where they are not supposed to when boyfriends,
husbands, babies, or other animals are added to a household.

Matthew
July 8th 06, 10:06 PM
It is called stress it effects and affects humans and animals the same
you are lucky that he has not left his calling card on her favorite things

BY the way Hi cybercat wonder where you have been



"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "angel" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>>
>>
>> I have a feeling this may be your fat buddies protest for your newest
>> fling (your child)
>>
>> this may be his way of getting attention
>> what do you think
>>
>
> This is exactly what I thought of. I have heard lots of stories about cats
> starting to poop and pee where they are not supposed to when boyfriends,
> husbands, babies, or other animals are added to a household.
>
>

Al
July 13th 06, 05:35 AM
You know I had a cat that urinated every where. I loved her dearly, and had
her to the vet and put on meds for it, but after one year of this I had to
put her down, nothing was working. My vet said it was to late to treat her,
and that it had become a habit. The sooner you get help from your vet the
sooner he may be able to help you. I live in Canada and was told of a
treatment that is used on cats for this behavior. Unfortunately for me it
was only available in the US at the time. (1998) Maybe your vet could
suggest Prozac or a tranquilizer of some sort. My cat had territorial issues
and couldn't stop marking her territory. If your present vet can't help, ask
another vet. Good luck.

"123456789" > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was

> just a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.

>

> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the

> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him.

> My wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping

> him and not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and

> pooping adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down!

> We have a 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and

> walking around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three
> options:

>

> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.

>

> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that

> ****es and carps in the house.

>

> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.

>

> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years

> (six

> foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out

> in the dog house for the most part.

>

> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I

> wanted to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take

> to outdoor life?

>

> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be

> appreciated.

>

>

"123456789" > wrote in message news:[email protected]
>I have 3 cats. One of them is a 28 pound cat that I found when he was just
>a few weeks old. That was in August 2000.
>
> Recently, he has started peeing and pooping in places other than the
> litter box. The vet says there is nothing medically wrong with him. My
> wife always hated the cat and was always ****ed at me for keeping him and
> not letting someone else take him. This latest peeing and pooping
> adventure was the last straw for her and he put her food down! We have a
> 14 month old and she (and I) don't want out son crawling and walking
> around the house through cat **** and crap, so she gave me three options:
>
> 1. Bring the cat to the vet and put him down, which I am not going to do.
>
> 2. Give the cat away. That's no good, no one wants a fat cat that ****es
> and carps in the house.
>
> 3. Put him outside. That is the option I took.
>
> I have a big dog house out in the back years, and a fully fenced years
> (six foot) which the cat is to fat to jump over. He had been hanging out
> in the dog house for the most part.
>
> I know many of you will say I am cruel for putting him out, but I wanted
> to know if anyone has ever done the same? How did the cat take to outdoor
> life?
>
> Any comments about making an indoor car and outdoor car would be
> appreciated.