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Winnifred
July 8th 06, 02:02 AM
hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.

Matthew
July 8th 06, 03:00 AM
That vet needs some more training it is a matter of patience and keeping
at it
"Winnifred" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>

123456789
July 8th 06, 03:11 AM
That's BS. I have 3 cats. They destroyed the old furniture I had in my
apartment.

After getting married and buying a house I swore I would not let the stuff
in my new home turn to car. I got "Soft Paws" and a few scratching posts.
Let them know I did not want then scratching the new furniture.

3 years later, I have the same furniture without a scratch on it.


"Winnifred" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>

Winnifred
July 8th 06, 04:20 AM
Matthew wrote:
> That vet needs some more training it is a matter of patience and keeping
> at it
> "Winnifred" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> > told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> > much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> > your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> > adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> > other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> > individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> > they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> > mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> > 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> > is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> > nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
> >
which method did you use that worked for you?

Matthew
July 8th 06, 04:47 AM
Every time they did it they got death from above water spray bottle I
took them and walked them over to the scratch post took their paws and
scratch the post it took patience and it was time consuming but I have
not furballs that scratch furniture
"Winnifred" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Matthew wrote:
>> That vet needs some more training it is a matter of patience and
>> keeping
>> at it
>> "Winnifred" > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> > hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
>> > told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
>> > much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
>> > your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
>> > adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
>> > other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
>> > individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
>> > they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
>> > mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
>> > 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
>> > is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
>> > nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>> >
> which method did you use that worked for you?
>

angel
July 8th 06, 05:25 AM
123456789 wrote:
> That's BS. I have 3 cats. They destroyed the old furniture I had in my
> apartment.

I know it's not funny, but you make it sound funny

> After getting married and buying a house I swore I would not let the stuff
> in my new home turn to car. I got "Soft Paws" and a few scratching posts.
> Let them know I did not want then scratching the new furniture.
>
> 3 years later, I have the same furniture without a scratch on it.


I don't think there is a cookie cutter for cat training
there are too many varied relationships going on here

some cats wouldn't dream of displeasing their owners, but for some it
is their daily delight.

In general when there is order in the home, I believe it is easier to
train a cat
when things tend to stay in disarray, I am certain our pets are aware
of it.

When you super clean the house and remove the clutter... and you
finally kick back and chill... notice how the cats also enjoy this same
feeling you do.

so, behavior problems are not exclusive to the cat, this is why I say
there is no cookie cutter or 100% 'proven method.

In solving a behavior problem, I think our first thought should be,
What is the message our pet is trying to convey..

before I dispense a discipline, I have to be convinced there is
willfullness in the cat against my wishes.

Scratching? Matt has the right idea... I also like the foil idea it's
very passive aggressive
they don't see it as correction, they just don't like it.

It's like spanking a child with a paddle, vs your hand, it's better to
use a paddle, this way you don't retract from your person through the
action, rather the paddle becomes disliked, not you or your hand (which
is associated with hugs and general doing and affection)

but can i be honest here...

if I had a stubborn cat who was over 5 or 6 and he was hard headed...

you don't wanna know, but i BET he wouldn't tear my furniture up
I would send him a very clear message. I wouldn't hurt him, I would
shock him

GODDA$%TT I SAID FU$#$%ING NO!!! <CLAPPING MY HANDS, STOMPING MY FEET
RUNNING UP ON HIM>.. MUTHER$%$%$CKER IM GOING TO CUT YOUR FU$%$%ING
TAIL OFF SO#$O#$#$BITCH...

and chase him down the hall, and rake him out from under the bed with a
broom...

the secret to training and this is the most important thing of all no
matter the method you chose... don't let them slide not even once...
every time you let them slide, You go back to start, do not pass go do
not collect $200.00

So, be consistent.

now if the cat respects you, and you respect him/her, you couple
respect with consistency, you got something then.

MaryL
July 8th 06, 08:56 AM
"Winnifred" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>

I don't know what type of "specialist" you consulted, but you need to find a
new one. I had no difficulty training any of my cats to use a scratching
post, including a former feral. I adopted Duffy two years ago when he was
estimated to be 3-5 years of age. It was obvious that he had no idea what a
scratching post is. Since he is blind, I expected that it would be
difficult to train him to use a scratching post -- it actually took two
days!! I *never* whacked, screamed, or sprayed water at any of my cats.
Positive reinforcement works much better than negative reinforcement.

First, you need a variety of scratching posts. I keep one in every room
because a cat is much more likely to use a post that is handy than to wander
through the house looking for one. You may need to experiment with
different surfaces and textures. Most of my scratching posts are wrapped
with sisal, and I have one made with sisal cloth. Duffy also likes the
corrugated cardboard center of his Turbo Scratcher. Again, most of my
scratching posts are upright, but some cats like horizontal scratchers or
incline scratchers. Make sure that any post you get is *sturdy,* and
upright posts should be *tall* enough so the cat cat stretch out when
scratching. It is important that the post be strong enough so your cat
cannot cause it to fall when scratching. If a post topples when your cat is
using it, your cat may become frightened and refuse to use it in the future.
Yes, it can be costly to have a post in every room, such as what I
described, but most of us buy them gradually over a period of time.Avoid the
type that is made with a cardboard base because they are too lightweight.
PetSmart usually has some sturdy posts, and some are not expensive.
Numerous varieties are available online, and some people make their own. If
your cat was previously an outdoor cat, you might even want to try a piece
of trunk or branch (again, heavy enough not to fall). You can see some of
my scratching posts if you scroll through some of the pictures under my
signature.

How did I train my cats to use scratching posts? I would go to a scratching
post and do something to get my cat's attention -- such as tapping the post
or running my nails over the post. Then I would pull a string (with a small
toy or piece of cloth tied to it) up and down the post. The cat will
invariably grab for the toy, and once his or her claws begin to scratch on
the post, I *praise* excessively. (Always put the string in a drawer or
other secure location if you are not watching it because it isn't safe to
have loose pieces of string, ribbon, rubber bands, etc. lying around -- many
cats will swallow them or become entangled.) I watched them *very*
carefully for the first couple of weeks after adoption. As soon as I saw
any sign that the cat was about to scratch on furniture or the carpeting, I
would say "no" (gently), walk over to the post, and begin tapping on it --
then lots of praise when the cat comes to the post. Sometimes, I would pick
up my cat, carry the cat to the post, and then begin the same process. It
doesn't take very long before a cat gets the idea that the scratching post
is the "preferred object" for scratching.

Good luck with this, and please ignore that "specialist" who seems to think
adult cats can't be trained.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7

angel
July 8th 06, 11:20 AM
MaryL wrote:

> Good luck with this, and please ignore that "specialist" who seems to think
> adult cats can't be trained.
>
> MaryL
>
> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<

> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf

what a very pretty desk and stool, i forget what you call that kind of
fabric on the stool

Nice 70's style mushroom modeled multi-tiered cat scratchier

Very pretty cats, you can't tell that duffy is blind
especially when you see him on the very top pedestal, or reaching out
playing with Holly

i don't think cats know when they are blind, maybe they do

see for you, your success came by watching them like a chicken
you said it yourself, for the first few weeks you watched them *very*
carefully

they probably lapped up all the attention

I like your creativity in training them, I would not have guessed they
would connect touching the scratcher in general (when chasing a toy or
something) with a scratching spot. That had to come off awkward for all
parties involved...

The cat is chasing a toy, all of a sudden he finds himself in school

They probably caught on quick for the praise of it.
--

You make me feel bad...

one time the cats (especially Jupiter the youngest) wouldn't let me
sleep so i shut the bedroom door and put them outside the door.

Jupiter kept scratching the door... it just so happened I had canned
foods on the mantle next to the bed (just temp storage) I heaved a can
of greenbeans at the door BOOM it sounded like a 22 going off... this
broke her for about an hour... then again, POW... that lasted for the
rest of the night...

the next night she tried to play on my door again.. BANG...

I never let her get by with playing on it, I was consistent heaving a
can upside the door..

in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
just awful)

MaryL
July 8th 06, 03:21 PM
"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> MaryL wrote:
>
>> Good luck with this, and please ignore that "specialist" who seems to
>> think
>> adult cats can't be trained.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
>
>> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>
> what a very pretty desk and stool, i forget what you call that kind of
> fabric on the stool
>
The stool is an antique (the desk is old, but not as old as the stool). The
fabric on the stool is actually very old needlepoint.

> Nice 70's style mushroom modeled multi-tiered cat scratchier
>
The cats *love* their cats trees (and, yes, one pole is wrapped with sisal
to provide a scratcher). If you don't have one, it's worth checking out --
just be sure whatever you get is *very* sturdy. I ordered both of mine from
www.createacatcondo.com. Their site is interactive, so you can "build" your
own and get an instant price (which is not as high as it sounds because
their trees are very heavy -- made of solid wood -- and the price includes
shipping).

> Very pretty cats, you can't tell that duffy is blind
> especially when you see him on the very top pedestal, or reaching out
> playing with Holly
>
> i don't think cats know when they are blind, maybe they do
>
Thanks. I think they are gorgeous cats, but most of us feel that way about
cats. Duffy has been blind from birth, so he did not need to learn to
adjust to a loss of sight. I suspect that helped him adapt so well.

> see for you, your success came by watching them like a chicken
> you said it yourself, for the first few weeks you watched them *very*
> carefully
>
> they probably lapped up all the attention
>
Yes, that's part of what I meant by positive reinforcement. I did watch
very carefully for the first couple of weeks, but it wasn't "hard" to do.

> I like your creativity in training them, I would not have guessed they
> would connect touching the scratcher in general (when chasing a toy or
> something) with a scratching spot. That had to come off awkward for all
> parties involved...
>
Thanks. It wasn't awkward, but I was very cautious when I was using my
fingers to scratch on the post because it usually isn't a good idea to use
hands in a play position -- too easy to be accidentally scratched.

> The cat is chasing a toy, all of a sudden he finds himself in school
>
> They probably caught on quick for the praise of it.

Exactly. Please give it a try instead of throwing stuff (as you described
below).

> --
>
> You make me feel bad...
>
> one time the cats (especially Jupiter the youngest) wouldn't let me
> sleep so i shut the bedroom door and put them outside the door.
>
> Jupiter kept scratching the door... it just so happened I had canned
> foods on the mantle next to the bed (just temp storage) I heaved a can
> of greenbeans at the door BOOM it sounded like a 22 going off... this
> broke her for about an hour... then again, POW... that lasted for the
> rest of the night...
>
> the next night she tried to play on my door again.. BANG...
>
> I never let her get by with playing on it, I was consistent heaving a
> can upside the door..
>
> in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
> has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
> I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
> just awful)
>
What does your door look like? It sounds like you would have a lot of
scratches and dents from the cans.

MaryL

cybercat
July 8th 06, 05:34 PM
"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
> has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
> I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
> just awful)
>

*shrug* I don't know how awful it is, there are humans and cats living in
the house, so the needs of both have to be considered. You need your
sleep in order to be nice and fresh to go out and bring home the cat food,
after all. If they knew that they would rubbing your head for you until
you fall asleep and tippy-toeing around the house!

Cats hate loud noises, and so loud noises will encourage avoidance of
whatever they are engaged in when the sound happens. This is why
I yell NO! as loudly as I can when mine do stuff they should not. As
long as you don't abuse this, and do it all the time, I think it is fine.

angel
July 8th 06, 09:59 PM
MaryL wrote:

> What does your door look like? It sounds like you would have a lot of
> scratches and dents from the cans.

it's an exterior solid wood security door, so luckily the door is fine

it had been days since I slept, I had tried talking nice, then beggings
"please let daddy sleep.. please Jupiter..."...

"baby come up here and get in the bed with daddy"...
oh noooo she said

I tuck Jupiter in like a football, she finds her way out and up the
curtains on the wall, yeah

Alison
July 9th 06, 12:49 AM
"Winnifred" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.>>.

If the cats are digging up your plants while you are at work and you come
home later and whack them with a newspaper how are they supposed to know
what you are whacking them for?

Cats like to dig in the earth and scratch, it's part of their intrinsic
behaviour. If you decide to have a cat, it's your responsibilty to provide
an outlet for them to do this and not to punish them when you fail to do
so.
Cats leave their scent from their paws when they scratch on furniture and
that's one reason why they are attracted back to scratch in the same place.
They don't do it deliberately to annoy you or have an agenda to destroy
your furniture. -:)
Alison





>

JJ
July 9th 06, 01:27 AM
Winnifred wrote:
> hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.

TRY THE cardboard scratchers that are available at Petsmart - my
furniture manglers are doing well with this devine invention - it is
like a flat cardboard piece and you sprinkle the cat nip in it - takes
a little diligence at first...

cybercat
July 9th 06, 01:40 AM
"JJ" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Winnifred wrote:
> > hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> > told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> > much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> > your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> > adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> > other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> > individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> > they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> > mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> > 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> > is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> > nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>
> TRY THE cardboard scratchers that are available at Petsmart - my
> furniture manglers are doing well with this devine invention - it is
> like a flat cardboard piece and you sprinkle the cat nip in it - takes
> a little diligence at first...
>

Also the Alpine Scratcher, which is on a slant. Mine love that one.
They do not scratch the furniture anymore.

Winnie, your "specialist" is full of it.

July 9th 06, 07:40 AM
angel wrote:

> Jupiter kept scratching the door... it just so happened I had canned
> foods on the mantle next to the bed (just temp storage) I heaved a can
> of greenbeans at the door BOOM it sounded like a 22 going off... this
> broke her for about an hour... then again, POW... that lasted for the
> rest of the night...
>
> in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
> has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
> I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
> just awful)

I keep some small stuffed animals (beanie babies and similar) on my
heardboard. If there is a cat fight, or Chase finds some plastic to
chew on; I just grab one and throw it at the sound. It stops. Nobody
gets hurt. Nothing gets damaged. And I just toss it back on the bed the
next day. I used to throw my kleenex box, but then I would have to find
it when I needed it,

Once, a long time ago, Chase was at the end of the room, and I nailed
him with the stuffed animal. He just looked at me with this shocked
expression. I think he was surprised I could aim that well.

MaryL
July 9th 06, 09:10 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> angel wrote:
>
>> Jupiter kept scratching the door... it just so happened I had canned
>> foods on the mantle next to the bed (just temp storage) I heaved a can
>> of greenbeans at the door BOOM it sounded like a 22 going off... this
>> broke her for about an hour... then again, POW... that lasted for the
>> rest of the night...
>>
>> in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
>> has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
>> I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
>> just awful)
>
> I keep some small stuffed animals (beanie babies and similar) on my
> heardboard. If there is a cat fight, or Chase finds some plastic to
> chew on; I just grab one and throw it at the sound. It stops. Nobody
> gets hurt. Nothing gets damaged. And I just toss it back on the bed the
> next day. I used to throw my kleenex box, but then I would have to find
> it when I needed it,
>
> Once, a long time ago, Chase was at the end of the room, and I nailed
> him with the stuffed animal. He just looked at me with this shocked
> expression. I think he was surprised I could aim that well.
>

All I need to do is call out to my cats to come to me or do something to
district them, such as pull a cloth across the floor or roll a toy in front
of them. That distracts them from what they are doing, and there is no need
to throw anything at them. In all my years of having cats, I have *never
once* thrown anything at my cats or sprayed them with water. They are
beautiful, happy, *well behaved* lovebugs.

MaryL

angel
July 9th 06, 01:13 PM
wrote:

> I keep some small stuffed animals (beanie babies and similar) on my
> heardboard. If there is a cat fight, or Chase finds some plastic to
> chew on; I just grab one and throw it at the sound. It stops. Nobody
> gets hurt. Nothing gets damaged. And I just toss it back on the bed the
> next day. I used to throw my kleenex box, but then I would have to find
> it when I needed it,
>
> Once, a long time ago, Chase was at the end of the room, and I nailed
> him with the stuffed animal. He just looked at me with this shocked
> expression. I think he was surprised I could aim that well.

That's fine for a democracy, but I'm running a dictatorship

I don't wanna have to repeat myself see..am I making myself clear
friesian?

I have long since put the canned goods out of the bedroom

muuu hahahahaha

haaaaaaaaaaaaa hjahahaha

angel
July 9th 06, 01:27 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "angel" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > in about 3 nights, she was broke forever.. and really to this day.. she
> > has no idea that i was the one throwing the cans... and I get to sleep.
> > I still have the cans as I cannot open them, the cans are mangled (it's
> > just awful)
> >
>
> *shrug* I don't know how awful it is

> If they knew that they would rubbing your head for you until
> you fall asleep and tippy-toeing around the house!

oh yeah! that would be down right fetching!
I luuuuv getting my head rubbed

reminds me of Bug Bunny massaging E.Fudds head with all 4 feet at the
barbershop
just before he fills Fudds mouth with shaving cream

> I yell NO! as loudly as I can

I bet
-
They think your a reptilian when you make that noise

does it sound like a Terradactyl?

you like to scream? I wouldn't mind

it's a good tension breaker

cybercat
July 9th 06, 02:43 PM
"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> wrote:
>
> > I keep some small stuffed animals (beanie babies and similar) on my
> > heardboard. If there is a cat fight, or Chase finds some plastic to
> > chew on; I just grab one and throw it at the sound. It stops. Nobody
> > gets hurt. Nothing gets damaged. And I just toss it back on the bed the
> > next day. I used to throw my kleenex box, but then I would have to find
> > it when I needed it,
> >
> > Once, a long time ago, Chase was at the end of the room, and I nailed
> > him with the stuffed animal. He just looked at me with this shocked
> > expression. I think he was surprised I could aim that well.
>
> That's fine for a democracy, but I'm running a dictatorship
>
> I don't wanna have to repeat myself see..am I making myself clear
> friesian?
>
> I have long since put the canned goods out of the bedroom
>
> muuu hahahahaha
>
> haaaaaaaaaaaaa hjahahaha
>

lol

Winnifred
July 11th 06, 04:11 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "JJ" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> >
> > Winnifred wrote:
> > > hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
> > > told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
> > > much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
> > > your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
> > > adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
> > > other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
> > > individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
> > > they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
> > > mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
> > > 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
> > > is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
> > > nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
> >
> > TRY THE cardboard scratchers that are available at Petsmart - my
> > furniture manglers are doing well with this devine invention - it is
> > like a flat cardboard piece and you sprinkle the cat nip in it - takes
> > a little diligence at first...
> >
>
> Also the Alpine Scratcher, which is on a slant. Mine love that one.
> They do not scratch the furniture anymore.
>
> Winnie, your "specialist" is full of it.

I'm glad to hear it. I hope it works out. I bought a really fancy cat
scratch tower. the foil is working 100% in preventing them from digging
in my plants. TX for all the tips.

123456789
July 12th 06, 04:13 AM
Soft Paws did work. I don't put them on anymore, because the only thing the
cats ever scratch now is the scratching post.


"Winnifred" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> 123456789 wrote:
>> That's BS. I have 3 cats. They destroyed the old furniture I had in my
>> apartment.
>>
>> After getting married and buying a house I swore I would not let the
>> stuff
>> in my new home turn to car. I got "Soft Paws" and a few scratching
>> posts.
>> Let them know I did not want then scratching the new furniture.
>>
>> 3 years later, I have the same furniture without a scratch on it.
>>
>>
>> "Winnifred" > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> > hate to be the bearer of bad news. just visited a specialist today. was
>> > told in cats that have the habit of scratching furniture it is pretty
>> > much impossible to change. the only way to have a cat who wont scratch
>> > your funiture is to train as a kitten to scratch on post. once they are
>> > adult and grown its too late to change. feramoans won't work. the only
>> > other alternative is to put 'soft paws'(plastic covers you glue to each
>> > individual cat claw) or de-clawing. with lasor it costs $400 a cat and
>> > they remove the claw from the first knuckle which to me seems more like
>> > mutalation. on the positive side the tin foil suggestion is working
>> > 100% so far in protecting my plants from being dug up. either the foil
>> > is working or the cats are sick and tired of me whacking them on the
>> > nose with a rolled up piece of newspaper when I come home.
>> >
> so soft paws worked for you? did you have to have them on all the time?
>

Lesley
July 12th 06, 02:13 PM
> TRY THE cardboard scratchers that are available at Petsmart - my
> furniture manglers are doing well with this devine invention - it is
> like a flat cardboard piece and you sprinkle the cat nip in it - takes
> a little diligence at first...

They are wonderful- my cats wouldn't use an upright post but when I put
the cardboard one down- instant problem solved!!!! They didn't even
need to be shown how to use it

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

MaryL
July 13th 06, 12:45 PM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>
>> TRY THE cardboard scratchers that are available at Petsmart - my
>> furniture manglers are doing well with this devine invention - it is
>> like a flat cardboard piece and you sprinkle the cat nip in it - takes
>> a little diligence at first...
>
> They are wonderful- my cats wouldn't use an upright post but when I put
> the cardboard one down- instant problem solved!!!! They didn't even
> need to be shown how to use it
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs
>

If your cats like the cardboard scratchers, you might also want to try a
Turbo Scratcher. Duffy loves that one -- a large circle with a ball mounted
in the outer ring and a cardboard scratcher in the center. So, you have a
toy and scratcher in one device. They are available at many places,
including WalMart. You can see a picture here:
http://www.thecatconnection.com/page/TCC/PROD/PLAY-SRTCH/PLAY-2602

Some comparison prices:
http://www.nextag.com/turbo-scratcher/search-html?nxtg=6300a20050e-949F1A0E28C86529

MaryL

Bttngl
July 13th 06, 02:07 PM
YES!

angel wrote:
> 123456789 wrote:
> > That's BS. I have 3 cats. They destroyed the old furniture I had in my
> > apartment.
>
> I know it's not funny, but you make it sound funny
>
> > After getting married and buying a house I swore I would not let the stuff
> > in my new home turn to car. I got "Soft Paws" and a few scratching posts.
> > Let them know I did not want then scratching the new furniture.
> >
> > 3 years later, I have the same furniture without a scratch on it.
>
>
> I don't think there is a cookie cutter for cat training
> there are too many varied relationships going on here
>
> some cats wouldn't dream of displeasing their owners, but for some it
> is their daily delight.
>
> In general when there is order in the home, I believe it is easier to
> train a cat
> when things tend to stay in disarray, I am certain our pets are aware
> of it.
>
> When you super clean the house and remove the clutter... and you
> finally kick back and chill... notice how the cats also enjoy this same
> feeling you do.
>
> so, behavior problems are not exclusive to the cat, this is why I say
> there is no cookie cutter or 100% 'proven method.
>
> In solving a behavior problem, I think our first thought should be,
> What is the message our pet is trying to convey..
>
> before I dispense a discipline, I have to be convinced there is
> willfullness in the cat against my wishes.
>
> Scratching? Matt has the right idea... I also like the foil idea it's
> very passive aggressive
> they don't see it as correction, they just don't like it.
>
> It's like spanking a child with a paddle, vs your hand, it's better to
> use a paddle, this way you don't retract from your person through the
> action, rather the paddle becomes disliked, not you or your hand (which
> is associated with hugs and general doing and affection)
>
> but can i be honest here...
>
> if I had a stubborn cat who was over 5 or 6 and he was hard headed...
>
> you don't wanna know, but i BET he wouldn't tear my furniture up
> I would send him a very clear message. I wouldn't hurt him, I would
> shock him
>
> GODDA$%TT I SAID FU$#$%ING NO!!! <CLAPPING MY HANDS, STOMPING MY FEET
> RUNNING UP ON HIM>.. MUTHER$%$%$CKER IM GOING TO CUT YOUR FU$%$%ING
> TAIL OFF SO#$O#$#$BITCH...
>
> and chase him down the hall, and rake him out from under the bed with a
> broom...
>
> the secret to training and this is the most important thing of all no
> matter the method you chose... don't let them slide not even once...
> every time you let them slide, You go back to start, do not pass go do
> not collect $200.00
>
> So, be consistent.
>
> now if the cat respects you, and you respect him/her, you couple
> respect with consistency, you got something then.