PDA

View Full Version : litter box problems


Tony Tung
July 10th 06, 06:48 PM
Hello,

My wife and I recently adopted a pair of kittens from a local shelter.
One of them (female, 2 mo) uses the litter box perfectly. The other one
(male, 3 mo) does know to use the litter box in that he does go to the
litter box. He digs, but he forgets to turn around. This often results
in him dropping his feces outside the box. He also forgets to bury his
wastes afterwards as well.

The shelter personnel said that he was separated from his mother at an
early age, so he didn't pick up proper litter box usage. We are hoping
that the girl would rub off on the boy, but is there anything else we can
do to encourage him?

Thanks,
Tony

Elle
July 10th 06, 07:23 PM
If one of you can accompany him to his litter box visits,
and then turn him around at the right moment, this might
help.

The first kitten I had many years ago did not know that in
the middle of the night, he was supposed to go downstairs by
himself and use the box rather than the bed. I walked him
down a few times a night for a week or so, and he got it.
(This was a urination problem, not a feces problem.)

OTOH, kittens have a way of learning on their own. All that
might be necessary is to give him a little time.

As you may be aware, remember that scolding kittens/cats
does not work. That's only for dogs. Kittens and cats do
better with positive reinforcement.


"Tony Tung" > wrote
> Hello,
>
> My wife and I recently adopted a pair of kittens from a
> local shelter.
> One of them (female, 2 mo) uses the litter box perfectly.
> The other one
> (male, 3 mo) does know to use the litter box in that he
> does go to the
> litter box. He digs, but he forgets to turn around. This
> often results
> in him dropping his feces outside the box. He also
> forgets to bury his
> wastes afterwards as well.
>
> The shelter personnel said that he was separated from his
> mother at an
> early age, so he didn't pick up proper litter box usage.
> We are hoping
> that the girl would rub off on the boy, but is there
> anything else we can
> do to encourage him?
>
> Thanks,
> Tony

angel
July 10th 06, 07:30 PM
Elle wrote:

> As you may be aware, remember that scolding kittens/cats
> does not work. That's only for dogs. Kittens and cats do
> better with positive reinforcement.

Elle says it's ok to scold dogs
i've never heard such rubbish

LOOK WHAT SHE WROTE

OMG!

Matthew
July 10th 06, 07:36 PM
Oh god you just opened up a can of worms and just stuck your foot in
your mouth

"Elle" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> If one of you can accompany him to his litter box visits, and then turn
> him around at the right moment, this might help.
>
> The first kitten I had many years ago did not know that in the middle of
> the night, he was supposed to go downstairs by himself and use the box
> rather than the bed. I walked him down a few times a night for a week or
> so, and he got it. (This was a urination problem, not a feces problem.)
>
> OTOH, kittens have a way of learning on their own. All that might be
> necessary is to give him a little time.
>
> As you may be aware, remember that scolding kittens/cats does not work.
> That's only for dogs. Kittens and cats do better with positive
> reinforcement.
>
>
> "Tony Tung" > wrote
>> Hello,
>>
>> My wife and I recently adopted a pair of kittens from a local shelter.
>> One of them (female, 2 mo) uses the litter box perfectly. The other one
>> (male, 3 mo) does know to use the litter box in that he does go to the
>> litter box. He digs, but he forgets to turn around. This often results
>> in him dropping his feces outside the box. He also forgets to bury his
>> wastes afterwards as well.
>>
>> The shelter personnel said that he was separated from his mother at an
>> early age, so he didn't pick up proper litter box usage. We are hoping
>> that the girl would rub off on the boy, but is there anything else we can
>> do to encourage him?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Tony
>
>

JJ
July 10th 06, 08:44 PM
Tony Tung wrote:
> Hello,
>
> My wife and I recently adopted a pair of kittens from a local shelter.
> One of them (female, 2 mo) uses the litter box perfectly. The other one
> (male, 3 mo) does know to use the litter box in that he does go to the
> litter box. He digs, but he forgets to turn around. This often results
> in him dropping his feces outside the box. He also forgets to bury his
> wastes afterwards as well.
>
> The shelter personnel said that he was separated from his mother at an
> early age, so he didn't pick up proper litter box usage. We are hoping
> that the girl would rub off on the boy, but is there anything else we can
> do to encourage him?
>
> Thanks,
> Tony

Tony, I have cat that seems to "miss" when in the box.....so I got a
large plastic containr from Walmart - like a Sterilite box and the
sides are so tall that kitty cannot help but keep it in box - works
like a charm and the plastic containr did not cost much. Good luck. jj

Outsider
July 10th 06, 09:37 PM
"Elle" > wrote in news:DWwsg.2782$vO.1871
@newsread4.news.pas.earthlink.net:

remember that scolding kittens/cats
> does not work. That's only for dogs.


wrong. Positive reinforcement is best for ALL pets. Your a biggot.

Popsie's Mom
July 11th 06, 02:53 AM
Hi, Tony and all,
Popsie could have been called poopsie at first because she did the same
thing as you described. She would dig a really cool potty hole in her
litter, then, turn AWAY from the hole ???? and hang her butt over the
normal sized litter pan. SO, we got a plastic storage bin with higher
sides than the regular litter pan and have it in the bathroom and so
when she has to go, we go with her and just as she makes the turn we
would give her a gentle bump and say "move up" or "center" and we would
be consistent but ALWAYS "GENTLE" in WORD and "bumpty rumpty", more
like a tiny shove into the right placement. She caught on. She is VERY
delicate and private. If startled she will "drop it" without covering
"it" up and jump out and go hide. And DON'T say "PEE YOU" - she
actually acts embarressed and will go and hide in shame. VERY
sensitive and NEVER abused EVER!! Just a WUSSY PUSSY!! hahhahhaha!
By the way, we found her when she still had her eyes closed and had her
tiny ears flattened down and wobbly legs, covered in ants and fleas, in
fact she could not even pee or poo on her own yet, I had to help her at
first with a damp cotton ball. We gave her "cat milk" by dropper round
the clock at first and it was touch and go. At that point, I was not
really planning on "adopting her" as in all the vet bills, life long,
etc. At that point, she was a helpless tiny critter and something in
me had a drive that said there might be hope cause it wiggled and it
was black and white and was pretty and we had just said we wanted one
of the monster-sized king tom of the area's kitten if we could ever
have one just like him and here it was. But, I had no idea if
he/she/it/?? would make it through the next few hours - at that point
with only $54/mo spending money allowance each - I was not going to
rush her to a vet. However, with help from more knowing people, we were
able to keep her going and help her through the crisis and now, 2yrs
later, she's a huge 15#, 36" beauty. At first I could not tell what
sex she was and some who had cats for years could not tell!! It's just
that she was SO fluffy! She looked like a round puff of fluff when we
got her. I figured she would be a persian (sp?) for sure. Does
anyone have any problem with having a cat that is big and fluffy and
can't - well - "reach"? I have to keep baby wipes on hand for my big
baby. Sorry to gab so much, if that's a no-no, someone tell me -
GENTLY - we people are like delicate cats - we can't take being yelled
at either. Thanks - Gail Lynn Batton


JJ wrote:
> Tony Tung wrote:
> > Hello,
> >
> > My wife and I recently adopted a pair of kittens from a local shelter.
> > One of them (female, 2 mo) uses the litter box perfectly. The other one
> > (male, 3 mo) does know to use the litter box in that he does go to the
> > litter box. He digs, but he forgets to turn around. This often results
> > in him dropping his feces outside the box. He also forgets to bury his
> > wastes afterwards as well.
> >
> > The shelter personnel said that he was separated from his mother at an
> > early age, so he didn't pick up proper litter box usage. We are hoping
> > that the girl would rub off on the boy, but is there anything else we can
> > do to encourage him?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Tony
>
> Tony, I have cat that seems to "miss" when in the box.....so I got a
> large plastic containr from Walmart - like a Sterilite box and the
> sides are so tall that kitty cannot help but keep it in box - works
> like a charm and the plastic containr did not cost much. Good luck. jj

July 11th 06, 05:00 AM
JJ wrote:

> Tony, I have cat that seems to "miss" when in the box.....so I got a
> large plastic containr from Walmart - like a Sterilite box and the
> sides are so tall that kitty cannot help but keep it in box - works
> like a charm and the plastic containr did not cost much. Good luck. jj

We use one of these in the bathroom, but for a different reason. Two
dogs that would like to get in. So that cats have to jump in. There's a
small spot at the end where they can miss, but it's easy enough to
remove the box and rinse the larger tub in the bathtub.

The downstairs box has the occasional miss. They all seem to prefer to
go right in a corner, so sometimes, they don't put their butt all the
way down. It's not often enough to be a big deal.

I do have tubs with a clip-on side that goes about 3 inches up. This
prevents two problems for me. One cat likes to paw at the box during
her cover-up procedure. So, this eliminates the liners being ripped to
shreds. And the other cat likes to dog to China before relieving
himself. Without that extra little wall, he shoots half the litter out
of the box.

One other thing. For the not covering. I have one of those. He means to
cover it up, but he doesn't move around when he's done. He's so big
that his front paws are nowhere near the pile, so while he does paw at
the litter, he covers up an imaginary pile, not the real one. It was
horrendous when I first got him since he stunk up the whole house (I'm
surprised you didn't all die of the smell regardless of what state or
coutry you reside in). I was having to scoop an additional two times a
day to keep from dying of air posioning. But once I changed his food,
the stink problem stopped. He still doesn't cover, but it doesn't
bother anybody now, and it does remind me to scoop the litter when I
see it.

So, as long as it doesn't stink, I wouldn't worry about that issue. If
it does stink, try changing his food. Typically, higher quality foods
produce less stink (and less waste).