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Rhonda
July 12th 06, 06:31 AM
Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.

The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.

Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.

Rhonda

Elizabeth Blake
July 12th 06, 06:51 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said he
> always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together, so
> we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if you
> have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda

Rhonda,

I'm sorry that Sweeter had to have surgery but I'm glad that it went well.
My kitties (especially Harriet) & I are all hoping for a quick, full
recovery for Sweeter.

--
Liz

Charlie Wilkes
July 12th 06, 08:50 AM
On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 05:31:30 GMT, Rhonda >
wrote:

>Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
>surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
>The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
>he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
>so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
>unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
>surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
>Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
>you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
>Rhonda

I'm so happy, Rhonda! I hope she will be ok, and I'll bet she will
with you looking after her interests.

Just don't let her watch videos of birds flying into windows.
Laughter could set her recovery back.

Charlie

Lesley
July 12th 06, 10:27 AM
Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
> you have any to spare.

Plenty of healing vibes and purrs for her- keep us posted

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

angel
July 12th 06, 11:13 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.


That's great, wishing Sweeter a successful recovery

-

When you say muscle tearing, it makes me think they came out of
place...
as in... tore lose from their place... you don't mean the muscle mass
was
tearing at touch? surely their not that fragile.. muscle is tough

Best to you's

Ann
July 12th 06, 01:22 PM
On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 05:31:30 +0000, Rhonda wrote:

> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
> he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
> so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this
> done.

Given the condition the surgeon found, there is no question that you did.
It's good news that the broken/small pelvis wasn't too restrictive to
prevent a good outcome.

Now comes the part where, while you want her home, you rationally want her
to stay at the vet's as long as she needs to. (And, the thought of taking
care of her is a little scary.) Best wishes!





> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
> you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda

Gail
July 12th 06, 02:13 PM
Great news, Rhonda. Please keep us posted.
Gail
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said he
> always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together, so
> we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if you
> have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda
>

22brix
July 12th 06, 03:08 PM
Poor kitty--she's been through a lot. I'm glad she made it through surgery.
My tortie "Tortle" sends many licks and purrs for a uneventful recovery.

Bonnie

"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said he
> always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together, so
> we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if you
> have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda
>

July 12th 06, 05:33 PM
Rhonda > wrote:

>Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
>surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.

Good for her! I'm not sure how this works though without a colon. What
special care will she need for the rest of her life?

-mhd

cybercat
July 12th 06, 05:58 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
> he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
> so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
> you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>

Oh, Rhonda I am so glad she is okay. Did he do some sort of
reconstruction or reorienting so that another part of her intestine
will serve as the colon? I hope you realize that few people would
give a little kitty such wonderful care.

Popsie's Mom
July 12th 06, 08:42 PM
Glad everything went ok. How does it work with a cat - with a human
they have a colostomy bag? How is she holding up, keep us posted. God
Bless You. Gail Lynn Batton


Rhonda wrote:
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
> he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
> so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
> you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 10:41 PM
Elizabeth Blake wrote:
>
> I'm sorry that Sweeter had to have surgery but I'm glad that it went well.
> My kitties (especially Harriet) & I are all hoping for a quick, full
> recovery for Sweeter.

Thanks, Liz. And thanks so much for all of your help in the last few days.

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 10:51 PM
-L. wrote:
> Wow Rhonda- glad she made it through surgery, and that it seems like
> you did the right thing. From one tortie to another, Mimi says "meow,
> purrr and get well soon!"

Thanks, Lyn. This was a new thing -- we've never been through anything
like this before.

Thank Mimi for the tortie vibes, too!

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 10:56 PM
Sweeter is home. They would have preferred to keep her another 12 hours
or so, but she would not eat for them. She is a former feral, hidey cat,
and was not liking the hospital.

She's now under the bed -- and she's not moving much. She is probably so
sore. I hope she comes around quickly. I can't wait for her to feel good
again.

Thanks for all of the good wishes.

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 10:59 PM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:

> I'm so happy, Rhonda! I hope she will be ok, and I'll bet she will
> with you looking after her interests.
>
> Just don't let her watch videos of birds flying into windows.
> Laughter could set her recovery back.

That's funny, Charlie. We'll take your advice and try to keep her from
laughing.

Thanks for thinking of us!

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:00 PM
Lesley wrote:
> Plenty of healing vibes and purrs for her- keep us posted

Thanks, Lesley. She really needed those vibes, and may for a little
while yet. I'm letting her rest for a little while then I'm going to see
if she'll eat for me.

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:04 PM
angel wrote:

> That's great, wishing Sweeter a successful recovery
>
> -
>
> When you say muscle tearing, it makes me think they came out of
> place...
> as in... tore lose from their place... you don't mean the muscle mass
> was
> tearing at touch? surely their not that fragile.. muscle is tough
>
> Best to you's

Her colon was all stretched out and thin, and the muscle layer tore when
he handled it. I was assured that that her abdomen was not contaminated.
The vet today (different vet) said in the notes it looks like part of
the colon they had to leave to attach to the small intestine, was torn.
Yikes. Maybe I shouldn't have asked more questions. They stitched it up
and think it will be fine.

Thanks for the interest,

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:07 PM
Ann wrote:
>
> Given the condition the surgeon found, there is no question that you did.
> It's good news that the broken/small pelvis wasn't too restrictive to
> prevent a good outcome.
>
> Now comes the part where, while you want her home, you rationally want her
> to stay at the vet's as long as she needs to. (And, the thought of taking
> care of her is a little scary.) Best wishes!


Yep, I'm glad she's home, but a bit nervous about her care. She came
home with lots of instructions and a medication schedule that's wild (a
pill at midnight...) Hope we're good vet techs.

The surgeon was not overly worried about the misshapen bones in the
pelvis. He said she's been dealing with it probably most of her life. It
might have made things worse this time but was not the cause (don't know
the cause.) Now that her stools will probably be much softer, it should
be less of an issue.

Thanks,

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:07 PM
Gail wrote:
> Great news, Rhonda. Please keep us posted.


Thanks, Gail. I appreciate everything you sent before-hand, that info
did help.

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:09 PM
22brix wrote:
> Poor kitty--she's been through a lot. I'm glad she made it through surgery.
> My tortie "Tortle" sends many licks and purrs for a uneventful recovery.


Hi Bonnie,

Sounds liket he torties are sticking together! That are such funny cats.

Thanks for the good wishes, and thank Tortle for us.

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:13 PM
wrote:

> Good for her! I'm not sure how this works though without a colon. What
> special care will she need for the rest of her life?


The colon forms the solid stool by pulling water out of the stuff that
comes from the small intestine. Cats without intestines tend to have
less-formed stools, but sometimes it eventually goes back to almost a
normal state . They do have to drink more water. The vet tries to leave
as much of the colon as possible because I believe that's where they
absorb B-vitamins.

The only long-term changes will probably be diet, and I don't know what
that will be yet. Right now we're trying A/D and prescription E/N (says
for gastric something or other.) I have to see the vet later about
long-term.

Thanks,

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 12th 06, 11:17 PM
cybercat wrote:

> Oh, Rhonda I am so glad she is okay. Did he do some sort of
> reconstruction or reorienting so that another part of her intestine
> will serve as the colon? I hope you realize that few people would
> give a little kitty such wonderful care.


Yes, her small intestine is pulled back and attached to whatever they
could leave of the colon (sounds like it's not much.) She basically will
skip the colon stage of the digestive process, although the vet said
some cats form almost solid stools again. He said he has no idea how
they do it!

He also said it's a bit of a trick to stitch a small intestine onto a
large, stretched-out piece of a colon. Some details, I could have done
without.

Thanks for the good wishes. I'm so glad to have this done! I'll be very
happy if we get through the next few days without complications.

Rhonda

Val
July 13th 06, 12:52 AM
Rhonda, my little orange tabby Precious Ray of Sunshine is going to
have an operation to remove his colon because he has megacolon...I am
hurriedly saving money for this operation, $950 bucks, yikes, I got a
second job to get it done. He is so sweet and precious, he goes nuts
when I sing "You Are My Sunshine," he has to stand on my shoulders and
press his little body as close to me as possible...I get a mouth full
of fur as I sing, but ask me if I care!!!

It heartens me to know that other kitties come through this operation
all right!!!

Valerie, San Fernando Valley


Rhonda wrote:
> Popsie's Mom wrote:
> > Glad everything went ok. How does it work with a cat - with a human
> > they have a colostomy bag? How is she holding up, keep us posted. God
> > Bless You. Gail Lynn Batton
>
>
> Hello Gail,
>
> No colostomy bag -- I asked that too. They said they seem to heal pretty
> well after being stitched. They do worry about infections but said those
> complications are pretty rare.
>
> Thanks for the reply,
>
> Rhonda

22brix
July 13th 06, 02:58 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> 22brix wrote:
>> Poor kitty--she's been through a lot. I'm glad she made it through
>> surgery. My tortie "Tortle" sends many licks and purrs for a uneventful
>> recovery.
>
>
> Hi Bonnie,
>
> Sounds liket he torties are sticking together! That are such funny cats.
>
> Thanks for the good wishes, and thank Tortle for us.
>
> Rhonda

Is Sweeter hell on wheels when she's feeling well? Tortle is a strange mix
of being very sweet with me and a screaming devil to some of my other cats.
She's quite petite and chases one of my 11 pounders, screeching all the way!
He runs as fast as he can to get away--it's a hoot to watch.

I do hope Sweeter continues to heal--is she still at the vet's? I always
feel better when they're home and I can start pampering them.

Bonnie

Candace
July 13th 06, 04:57 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> Sweeter is home. They would have preferred to keep her another 12 hours
> or so, but she would not eat for them. She is a former feral, hidey cat,
> and was not liking the hospital.
>
> She's now under the bed -- and she's not moving much. She is probably so
> sore. I hope she comes around quickly. I can't wait for her to feel good
> again.
>
> Thanks for all of the good wishes.
>
> Rhonda

Rhonda, I'm so glad Sweeter is safely through her suregery and home
with you now. Poor little girl, I hope she feels better quickly.

Candace

Phil P.
July 13th 06, 05:11 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Well, Sweeter had her colon removed today after a consultation with a
> surgeon. She was running out of time, poor cat.
>
> The surgeon just called and she made it through surgery, yeah! He said
> he always worries about the area where the colon is stitched together,
> so we're not out of the woods yet. He also said her colon was very
> unhealthy -- when he touched it the muscles started tearing. That
> surprised him. I believe we made the right decision to just get this done.
>
> Thanks for all of the input. Send a little torti cat healing vibes if
> you have any to spare. She's been brave through everything.
>
> Rhonda

I think you should be feeding her a highly digestible low residue diet that
produces less waste- less waste/small stools puts less stress on the
anastomosis and will reduce the risk of tearing and/or leaking. Hill's i/d
is the best because it's highly digestible and also has a mixed fiber source
which when broken down by water to SCFAs stimulates colonic mucosal
regeneration which should speed up healing.

You should expect to see soft or loose stools for awhile until the colon
heals and becomes functional again- but if she develops profuse diarrhea
your vet should put her on antibiotics- might be due to perioperative
contamination. The colon is loaded with bacteria.

I'm glad she pulled through.

Phil P.
July 13th 06, 05:11 AM
"Val" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Rhonda, my little orange tabby Precious Ray of Sunshine is going to
> have an operation to remove his colon because he has megacolon...I am
> hurriedly saving money for this operation, $950 bucks, yikes, I got a
> second job to get it done. He is so sweet and precious, he goes nuts
> when I sing "You Are My Sunshine," he has to stand on my shoulders and
> press his little body as close to me as possible...I get a mouth full
> of fur as I sing, but ask me if I care!!!
>
> It heartens me to know that other kitties come through this operation
> all right!!!

Just make sure you use a surgeon and not a general practioner.

Best of luck,

Phil

Rhonda
July 13th 06, 05:25 AM
Hi Val,

What a cute name!

That's great of you to work so hard to help out your cat. He sounds like
such a sweetie.

Something like this is such a huge, unexpected expense. Ours was more
than twice what you paid, so to me it sounds like you got a deal! Our
surgeon was at an emergency clinic, and it costs about $1000 to walk in
the door there...

We've had some tense moments tonight, but called the doctor and he says
this is to be expected. She had an enormous surgery less than 24 hours
ago. Finally, she is resting comfortably and even purred a little. I
could walk out into the yard and let out a big scream!

Now she needs to eat, but I think that will happen soon.

Good luck with your baby and remember to keep us posted!

Rhonda

PS -- You might want to arrange time off work after the operation if you
can. At least be off the day she comes home. Sweeter has 3 medications
but 2 are twice a day and at different times, so we have to work out a
schedule we can all live with.


Val wrote:
> Rhonda, my little orange tabby Precious Ray of Sunshine is going to
> have an operation to remove his colon because he has megacolon...I am
> hurriedly saving money for this operation, $950 bucks, yikes, I got a
> second job to get it done. He is so sweet and precious, he goes nuts
> when I sing "You Are My Sunshine," he has to stand on my shoulders and
> press his little body as close to me as possible...I get a mouth full
> of fur as I sing, but ask me if I care!!!
>
> It heartens me to know that other kitties come through this operation
> all right!!!
>
> Valerie, San Fernando Valley
>
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>Popsie's Mom wrote:
>>
>>>Glad everything went ok. How does it work with a cat - with a human
>>>they have a colostomy bag? How is she holding up, keep us posted. God
>>>Bless You. Gail Lynn Batton
>>
>>
>>Hello Gail,
>>
>>No colostomy bag -- I asked that too. They said they seem to heal pretty
>>well after being stitched. They do worry about infections but said those
>>complications are pretty rare.
>>
>>Thanks for the reply,
>>
>>Rhonda
>
>

Rhonda
July 13th 06, 05:30 AM
Hi Bonnie,

Sweeter is a former feral kitten, and never lost the need to hide during
the day. She is very sweet. When she was young, she used to wrestle with
one of our other cats, but not too much. She sounds very different from
your cat! Tortle sounds like a little home entertainment center.

Sweeter is home, and I'm trying to balance giving her time to collapse
and rest, and petting her until she's threadbare.

Rhonda

22brix wrote:
>
> Is Sweeter hell on wheels when she's feeling well? Tortle is a strange mix
> of being very sweet with me and a screaming devil to some of my other cats.
> She's quite petite and chases one of my 11 pounders, screeching all the way!
> He runs as fast as he can to get away--it's a hoot to watch.
>
> I do hope Sweeter continues to heal--is she still at the vet's? I always
> feel better when they're home and I can start pampering them.
>
> Bonnie
>
>

Rhonda
July 13th 06, 05:30 AM
Candace wrote:
>
> Rhonda, I'm so glad Sweeter is safely through her suregery and home
> with you now. Poor little girl, I hope she feels better quickly.

Thanks, Candace. I feel like she's starting to turn a corner -- I loved
hearing that first purr!

Take care,

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 13th 06, 05:35 AM
Phil P. wrote:
>
> I think you should be feeding her a highly digestible low residue diet that
> produces less waste- less waste/small stools puts less stress on the
> anastomosis and will reduce the risk of tearing and/or leaking. Hill's i/d
> is the best because it's highly digestible and also has a mixed fiber source
> which when broken down by water to SCFAs stimulates colonic mucosal
> regeneration which should speed up healing.
>
> You should expect to see soft or loose stools for awhile until the colon
> heals and becomes functional again- but if she develops profuse diarrhea
> your vet should put her on antibiotics- might be due to perioperative
> contamination. The colon is loaded with bacteria.
>
> I'm glad she pulled through.

I've been warned by the surgeon that her stool is going to be very loose
at first, and probably semi-loose for her lifetime. She has already
dribbled a little (hope no one was eating.) I'm glad to see that the
pipes are working.

I'll ask about the food at the next appt, they did give us some E/N to
try. For now, it's probably going to be very loose but we just have to
concentrate on getting her eating again.

She's one 2 antibiotics right now.

Rhonda

22brix
July 13th 06, 06:11 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Sweeter is home, and I'm trying to balance giving her time to collapse and
> rest, and petting her until she's threadbare.
>
> Rhonda
>
Rhonda,

I hope you can get some rest, too. It's so nerve-racking when they're
sick--I've spent more than one sleepless night worried sick about one of my
troop. In my experience cats heal so much better when they're home where the
people they love are there to baby them, where they're surroundings are
familiar.

I have two former ferals that are pretty well adjusted but they do hide more
than my other cats--when people come over, you can't see even a whisker.

I hope she continues to regain her health and hope she's soon herself
again. I can see she's going to be spoiled rotten!

Bonnie

Wendy
July 13th 06, 12:05 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. wrote:
>>
>> I think you should be feeding her a highly digestible low residue diet
>> that
>> produces less waste- less waste/small stools puts less stress on the
>> anastomosis and will reduce the risk of tearing and/or leaking. Hill's
>> i/d
>> is the best because it's highly digestible and also has a mixed fiber
>> source
>> which when broken down by water to SCFAs stimulates colonic mucosal
>> regeneration which should speed up healing.
>>
>> You should expect to see soft or loose stools for awhile until the colon
>> heals and becomes functional again- but if she develops profuse diarrhea
>> your vet should put her on antibiotics- might be due to perioperative
>> contamination. The colon is loaded with bacteria.
>>
>> I'm glad she pulled through.
>
> I've been warned by the surgeon that her stool is going to be very loose
> at first, and probably semi-loose for her lifetime. She has already
> dribbled a little (hope no one was eating.) I'm glad to see that the pipes
> are working.
>
> I'll ask about the food at the next appt, they did give us some E/N to
> try. For now, it's probably going to be very loose but we just have to
> concentrate on getting her eating again.
>
> She's one 2 antibiotics right now.
>
> Rhonda
>

Did they say whether wet or dry would be better after this kind of surgery?
My foster who had a large section of Ileum removed does much better (firmer
poo) on wet food. Give her more than a tiny bit of dry and her poo resembles
applesauce and her butt gets irritated.

W

Rhonda
July 14th 06, 02:22 AM
Wendy wrote:
>
> Did they say whether wet or dry would be better after this kind of surgery?
> My foster who had a large section of Ileum removed does much better (firmer
> poo) on wet food. Give her more than a tiny bit of dry and her poo resembles
> applesauce and her butt gets irritated.

Hi Wendy,

We have a recheck tomorrow and I'll ask about food. I would assume too
that it will be wet food.

So far, we're not having great luck getting her to eat anything, but she
has had a couple t-spoons of wet food.

Rhonda

Gail
July 14th 06, 02:23 AM
Have you tried meated baby food without onion? Make sure it is room
temperature or a little warmed up.
Gail
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Wendy wrote:
>>
>> Did they say whether wet or dry would be better after this kind of
>> surgery? My foster who had a large section of Ileum removed does much
>> better (firmer poo) on wet food. Give her more than a tiny bit of dry and
>> her poo resembles applesauce and her butt gets irritated.
>
> Hi Wendy,
>
> We have a recheck tomorrow and I'll ask about food. I would assume too
> that it will be wet food.
>
> So far, we're not having great luck getting her to eat anything, but she
> has had a couple t-spoons of wet food.
>
> Rhonda
>

cybercat
July 14th 06, 03:24 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote :
>
> So far, we're not having great luck getting her to eat anything, but she
> has had a couple t-spoons of wet food.
>

Poor baby. :( I hope she's better soon.

Rhonda
July 14th 06, 10:15 AM
Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...

She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
hurts -- she gets food in her mouth and then sticks out her tongue
repeatedly like cats do when they have a wad of fur stuck in their mouths.

Maybe it's just her sore tummy too, we will keep trying.

Rhonda

Gail wrote:
> Have you tried meated baby food without onion? Make sure it is room
> temperature or a little warmed up.

Phil P.
July 14th 06, 11:16 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
>
> She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
> hurts --

Was she intubated during anesthesia?

Ann
July 14th 06, 12:02 PM
On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 09:15:38 +0000, Rhonda wrote:
> Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
>
> She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
> hurts -- she gets food in her mouth and then sticks out her tongue
> repeatedly like cats do when they have a wad of fur stuck in their
> mouths.

I've had good luck with over the years with homemade turkey broth. What
works best is a turkey drumstick, the bigger the better. (Modern turkeys
are rather bland and the bigger, older birds are more flavorful.) I use
one of those cheap rectangular electric slow cookers that has a
temperature control. Put just a little bit of water in, to cover the
bottom of the cooker, and cook it, covered, at just below boiling until
the meat is falling off the bone; it takes hours. Then, take out the
large bone, gristle, and larger of the multitude of pesky little drumstick
bones, and cook it a little more.

The broth will gel at room temperature so it will have to be diluted for
feeding. For storage more than overnight (refrigerated), I put it in a
plastic food storage container, big enough so the layer is maybe 1/2 inch
and freeze it. That way I can chip out portion size pieces for feeding.
(I use a screwdriver and a small hammer. <g>)

Imo, part of why it usually works is that, unlike solid food, they can't
spit it out. And, it must be vitamin and mineral rich; it's the cat
version of chicken soup.




> Maybe it's just her sore tummy too, we will keep trying.
>
> Rhonda
>
> Gail wrote:
>> Have you tried meated baby food without onion? Make sure it is room
>> temperature or a little warmed up.

cybercat
July 14th 06, 06:12 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
>
> She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
> hurts -- she gets food in her mouth and then sticks out her tongue
> repeatedly like cats do when they have a wad of fur stuck in their mouths.
>

Is it possible that she was intubated?

Rhonda
July 14th 06, 06:12 PM
Phil P. wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
>>
>>She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
>>hurts --
>
> Was she intubated during anesthesia?

I don't know, but I think she might have been with the way she's acting.

Rhonda

cybercat
July 14th 06, 06:12 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
> >
> > She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
> > hurts --
>
> Was she intubated during anesthesia?
>
>

Oh, then I guess it was. I asked because humans I know who have been say it
hurts afterward.

Rhonda
July 14th 06, 06:18 PM
Oh wow, you are a good cat mom!

I wonder if I could do this in a crock pot -- maybe turkey pieces anyway.

Rhonda

Ann wrote:
>
> I've had good luck with over the years with homemade turkey broth. What
> works best is a turkey drumstick, the bigger the better. (Modern turkeys
> are rather bland and the bigger, older birds are more flavorful.) I use
> one of those cheap rectangular electric slow cookers that has a
> temperature control. Put just a little bit of water in, to cover the
> bottom of the cooker, and cook it, covered, at just below boiling until
> the meat is falling off the bone; it takes hours. Then, take out the
> large bone, gristle, and larger of the multitude of pesky little drumstick
> bones, and cook it a little more.
>
> The broth will gel at room temperature so it will have to be diluted for
> feeding. For storage more than overnight (refrigerated), I put it in a
> plastic food storage container, big enough so the layer is maybe 1/2 inch
> and freeze it. That way I can chip out portion size pieces for feeding.
> (I use a screwdriver and a small hammer. <g>)
>
> Imo, part of why it usually works is that, unlike solid food, they can't
> spit it out. And, it must be vitamin and mineral rich; it's the cat
> version of chicken soup.

Ann
July 14th 06, 08:09 PM
On Fri, 14 Jul 2006 17:18:45 +0000, Rhonda wrote:

> Oh wow, you are a good cat mom!
>
> I wonder if I could do this in a crock pot -- maybe turkey pieces
> anyway.

Iirc, I did use a regular crock pot until the rectangular whatever they're
called came out. Since it didn't have a variable heat dial, it took
longer to heat up, etc ... and there was the problem of the drumsticks
being longer than the crock pot was wide. I sawed them off to get them in
until I realized that the pruning lopper would be easier. <g>

I tried turkey thighs instead a couple times and that broth wasn't
accepted as well. Maybe there is something that cooks out of all the
little bones in a turkey drumstick as well as the stronger flavor of the
meat.

Something that doesn't work as well, but is much quicker is chicken liver.
I do them in a covered dish in a microwave at ~3, just enough be sure all
the frest blood color is gone (it's cooked through). Do be aware that
chicken livers will "explode" if one doesn't cut them up or prick them
well with a fork before nuking. I've had cats that go berserk over liver
and cats that turn up their nose at it.

I never had much luck with baby food. It's formulated to be bland and the
majority of cats I've had prefer a stronger taste.

> Rhonda
>
> Ann wrote:
<...>

Phil P.
July 14th 06, 09:00 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. wrote:
> > "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >
> >>Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
> >>
> >>She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
> >>hurts --
> >
> > Was she intubated during anesthesia?
>
> I don't know, but I think she might have been with the way she's acting.
>

If the tube wasn't lubricated or inserted properly her esophagus might be
sore or injured. Better have a vet take a look to make sure she
doesn't/hasn't developed an esophageal stricture.

Are you following the pills with a water/tuna water or canned food chaser?
Pills can be retained in the esophagus for 5 or 6 minutes and begin to
dissolve and cause irritation/inflammation or even a stricture.

Rhonda
July 15th 06, 04:57 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
>>
>>>Yep, trying baby food, A/D, cat food with sardines...
>>>
>>>She's eaten another few teaspoons. It's almost like her mouth or throat
>>>hurts --
>>
>>Was she intubated during anesthesia?
>
> Oh, then I guess it was. I asked because humans I know who have been say it
> hurts afterward.


I called the emergency clinic because Sweeter started drooling from nose
and mouth. A lot. They will probably need to put me away by the time
this is done!

They believe the medtrinidizole is upsetting her stomach. They said to
take her off of it and monitor.

We had a post-surgery check with our regular vet today, who is replacing
the antibiotic with baytril. She'll still be on 2 antibiotics, but
hopefully this will help her stomach. She also said her throat looks
good from what she can see -- but is probably irritated from the
medicine and tube. She thinks though that the main problem is her upset
stomach.

Sweeter also has a fever -- borderline of normal post-surgery high vs.
possible infection. The incision looks great, I'm just hoping the things
inside are going to straighten up here soon.

Oh, and we got home later tonight and Sweeter was not under her bed. She
was NOWHERE to be found! OMG. After a long tense search, we found her in
the far end of the house. She is so traumatized by all of the vet visits
that she left her safety net to hide from us. I feel like the bad guy,
but these things have to happen to help her.

So, her base of operations is now a closet. That must have hurt --
jumping over a high baby gate to leave her room (she is afraid of
Abernathy and there baby gate is there to keep him out.)

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 15th 06, 04:59 AM
Oh boy, chicken liver? I would do a lot for Sweeter, but this I might
need help. Ick.

I might try that, though. That broth idea might work.

Thanks for the tips.

Rhonda

Ann wrote:
> Iirc, I did use a regular crock pot until the rectangular whatever they're
> called came out. Since it didn't have a variable heat dial, it took
> longer to heat up, etc ... and there was the problem of the drumsticks
> being longer than the crock pot was wide. I sawed them off to get them in
> until I realized that the pruning lopper would be easier. <g>
>
> I tried turkey thighs instead a couple times and that broth wasn't
> accepted as well. Maybe there is something that cooks out of all the
> little bones in a turkey drumstick as well as the stronger flavor of the
> meat.
>
> Something that doesn't work as well, but is much quicker is chicken liver.
> I do them in a covered dish in a microwave at ~3, just enough be sure all
> the frest blood color is gone (it's cooked through). Do be aware that
> chicken livers will "explode" if one doesn't cut them up or prick them
> well with a fork before nuking. I've had cats that go berserk over liver
> and cats that turn up their nose at it.
>
> I never had much luck with baby food. It's formulated to be bland and the
> majority of cats I've had prefer a stronger taste.

Rhonda
July 15th 06, 05:01 AM
Phil P. wrote:
>
> If the tube wasn't lubricated or inserted properly her esophagus might be
> sore or injured. Better have a vet take a look to make sure she
> doesn't/hasn't developed an esophageal stricture.
>
> Are you following the pills with a water/tuna water or canned food chaser?
> Pills can be retained in the esophagus for 5 or 6 minutes and begin to
> dissolve and cause irritation/inflammation or even a stricture.


The vet thinks the tube or the pills could have irritated her throat,
but thinks the main problem is nausea. She swallows a lot, and earlier
she was drooling from nose and mouth.

She's on a new antibiotic and also now has liquid pain medication. I'll
give that to her after the pills to help wash them down.

She is traumatized, so am I.

Rhonda

cybercat
July 15th 06, 03:36 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
>
> I called the emergency clinic because Sweeter started drooling from nose
> and mouth.

Oh, no.

>A lot. They will probably need to put me away by the time
> this is done!

I can imagine, I would be a wreck.


>
> They believe the medtrinidizole is upsetting her stomach. They said to
> take her off of it and monitor.

This sure sounds right. Imagine that your stomach is upset, then think
about eating, you know? And drooling is certainly a sign of nausea.
Rhonda, I'm sorry if you already explained this, but what is the
medtrinidizole for?

>
> We had a post-surgery check with our regular vet today, who is replacing
> the antibiotic with baytril. She'll still be on 2 antibiotics, but
> hopefully this will help her stomach. She also said her throat looks
> good from what she can see -- but is probably irritated from the
> medicine and tube. She thinks though that the main problem is her upset
> stomach.

Poor little Sweeter, not just the nausea, but also she has been intubated
and so is sore. At least there are no complications there in her throat that
the vet can see, and that is good!

>
> Sweeter also has a fever -- borderline of normal post-surgery high vs.
> possible infection. The incision looks great, I'm just hoping the things
> inside are going to straighten up here soon.

Keeping you both in my prayers. That was major surgery, so I imagine
she has a way to go.

>
> Oh, and we got home later tonight and Sweeter was not under her bed. She
> was NOWHERE to be found! OMG. After a long tense search, we found her in
> the far end of the house. She is so traumatized by all of the vet visits
> that she left her safety net to hide from us. I feel like the bad guy,
> but these things have to happen to help her.
>
> So, her base of operations is now a closet. That must have hurt --
> jumping over a high baby gate to leave her room (she is afraid of
> Abernathy and there baby gate is there to keep him out.)
>
Oh, Rhonda. I wish she had not done that, I hope she didn't hurt
herself. But you know you aren't the bad guy, there actually isn't
a bad guy, just a good cat mom. Sweeter doesn't know it because
she just has a little cat brain! In the end, as she feels better, she will
come to understand via instinct if nothing else. It is really odd, but
our Boo, who is so traumatized by the vet that she howls when she
hits the carrier and never stops until she gets home, hoarse, actually
began following me around and invading Gracie's turf after I took
her in when she was in trouble with fainting spells/heart problems.
She suddenly had to be near me, even though *I* was the one who
took her in! Seems she would associate me with the vet and avoid me,
right? I know it sounds unlikely, but in my heart I know she somehow
"intuited" (is that a word?) that I was helping her, or trying.

Sweeter is a lucky, lucky cat to be so loved. Hang in there.

cybercat
July 15th 06, 03:37 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Oh boy, chicken liver? I would do a lot for Sweeter, but this I might
> need help. Ick.
>

I'm with you there. My mom cooked them every now and then, but
she was the only one who would touch them! Just the smell ...

Rhonda
July 16th 06, 06:00 AM
cybercat wrote:
> This sure sounds right. Imagine that your stomach is upset, then think
> about eating, you know? And drooling is certainly a sign of nausea.
> Rhonda, I'm sorry if you already explained this, but what is the
> medtrinidizole for?

That is an antibiotic. They had her on two -- they said they are always
concerned about internal infections on this kind of surgery.

> It is really odd, but
> our Boo, who is so traumatized by the vet that she howls when she
> hits the carrier and never stops until she gets home, hoarse, actually
> began following me around and invading Gracie's turf after I took
> her in when she was in trouble with fainting spells/heart problems.
> She suddenly had to be near me, even though *I* was the one who
> took her in! Seems she would associate me with the vet and avoid me,
> right? I know it sounds unlikely, but in my heart I know she somehow
> "intuited" (is that a word?) that I was helping her, or trying.

That's a great story, and I was glad to be reminded of how cats know
when you're helping. Logically, I know they are forgiving but it's still
hard to hear them hiss at you during the trauma. During one tense moment
the other day, it occurred to me that if she pulls through this thing,
we will probably be more bonded.

We are syringe-feeding her now and she is not fighting it. This
afternoon, she even licked the end of the syringe.

She had a temperature spike this morning (103.9) that made me call the
clinic again. They said it's not quite an emergency yet, but check her
temp in 8 hrs. I just checked and it's down .9 degrees -- woo hooo!

I ran to the pain clinic and got injectable pain meds for her, she was
pretty uncomfortable today. It's taking awhile to find the right thing
for her. Last night, we tried liquid pain meds which she threw up
immediately.

Thanks for the story and the encouragement. Both were needed!

Rhonda