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catface
July 14th 06, 06:16 AM
My nine year old shorthair, Oscar who used to be very easy to manage
has suddenly developed this bad habit of eliminating all over the
house, even on laundry and beds. He uses his litter box and then goes
on a rampage depositing a little in different spots, unless I lock him
in the bathroom. (where his box is).And I can't be around to catch him
every time. He started this when he had a constipation problem, but he
doesn't have any difficulty now. It's not even very consistent. There
are days when he uses the litterbox and doesn't misbehave. I'm at my
wits end. Is it a bid for attention?

paramont
July 14th 06, 08:26 AM
.. He uses his litter box and then goes
> on a rampage depositing a little in different spots...

My 12 year Maine Coon cat seemed to be doing this after he had Calissa
Virus (FCV). He was too sick to groom himself properly (sores from the
virus on his mouth) so he was getting matted around his rear end, then
fecal matter was sticking to his matted fur. Then as he walked around
the house bits would fall off. He wasn't doing it on purpose. Have
you checked your cat after he comes out of the litter box - is his rear
end clean? Have you actually caught him squatting and relieving
himself?

Toni
July 14th 06, 11:59 AM
"paramont" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> My 12 year Maine Coon cat seemed to be doing this after he had Calissa
> Virus (FCV).




Not to be a jerk or anything, purely so folks don't get confused, it is
calicivirus .



--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/kitties.htm

catface
July 14th 06, 02:47 PM
paramont wrote:
> . He uses his litter box and then goes
> > on a rampage depositing a little in different spots...
>
> My 12 year Maine Coon cat seemed to be doing this after he had Calissa
> Virus (FCV). He was too sick to groom himself properly (sores from the
> virus on his mouth) so he was getting matted around his rear end, then
> fecal matter was sticking to his matted fur. Then as he walked around
> the house bits would fall off. He wasn't doing it on purpose. Have
> you checked your cat after he comes out of the litter box - is his rear
> end clean? Have you actually caught him squatting and relieving
> himself

Thank you paramont. Oscar actually "digs", squats and relieves himself.
Which is why he likes sheets and laundry, to dig in. He's not in pain,
his stools are normally formed and sometimes he scuttles to his box
when I shout. So I know its not a medical problem. I have to pick him
up when I see him poised over something and carry him , protesting and
kicking, to the litter box.

paramont
July 14th 06, 05:17 PM
>
> Not to be a jerk or anything, purely so folks don't get confused, it is
> calicivirus .
>
>
>
> --
> Toni

Thanks Toni - I couldn't remember the spelling - just how it sounded.
But this might help someone else who is searching for other's
experience with calicivirus and the correction is welcome :)

22brix
July 14th 06, 05:41 PM
Some cats will associate the discomfort they may have had (such as with the
constipation) and be unwilling to use the box again for fear of more pain
and discomfort. Oscar could also have a urinary tract
infection--inappropriate elimination is a very common symptom of a UTI. (I
wasn't sure from your post if he's urinating inappropriately or if it was
defecation.). Sometimes it helps to confine them to a smaller area (such as
the bathroom) and retrain them to use the cat box again. If he hasn't been
checked for a UTI I'd take him to the vet.

Good luck, Bonnie

"catface" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> My nine year old shorthair, Oscar who used to be very easy to manage
> has suddenly developed this bad habit of eliminating all over the
> house, even on laundry and beds. He uses his litter box and then goes
> on a rampage depositing a little in different spots, unless I lock him
> in the bathroom. (where his box is).And I can't be around to catch him
> every time. He started this when he had a constipation problem, but he
> doesn't have any difficulty now. It's not even very consistent. There
> are days when he uses the litterbox and doesn't misbehave. I'm at my
> wits end. Is it a bid for attention?
>

Toni
July 14th 06, 06:19 PM
"paramont" > wrote in message
>
> Thanks Toni - I couldn't remember the spelling - just how it sounded.
> But this might help someone else who is searching for other's
> experience with calicivirus and the correction is welcome :)
>


Phew!
You never know how someone is going to react around here <g>.



--
Toni
http://www.cearbhaill.com/kitties.htm

Wendy
July 14th 06, 08:45 PM
"catface" > wrote in message
ps.com...
>
> paramont wrote:
>> . He uses his litter box and then goes
>> > on a rampage depositing a little in different spots...
>>
>> My 12 year Maine Coon cat seemed to be doing this after he had Calissa
>> Virus (FCV). He was too sick to groom himself properly (sores from the
>> virus on his mouth) so he was getting matted around his rear end, then
>> fecal matter was sticking to his matted fur. Then as he walked around
>> the house bits would fall off. He wasn't doing it on purpose. Have
>> you checked your cat after he comes out of the litter box - is his rear
>> end clean? Have you actually caught him squatting and relieving
>> himself
>
> Thank you paramont. Oscar actually "digs", squats and relieves himself.
> Which is why he likes sheets and laundry, to dig in. He's not in pain,
> his stools are normally formed and sometimes he scuttles to his box
> when I shout. So I know its not a medical problem. I have to pick him
> up when I see him poised over something and carry him , protesting and
> kicking, to the litter box.
>

You don't know it's not a medical problem. Cats are very good at hiding
their pain. Instead they do obnoxious things to get our attention so we take
them to the vet. It is not normal for a 9 yr old cat to change behavior
suddenly. The easiest place to start solving the problem is to have him
checked out. I wouldn't be particularly impressed even if the cat had been
at the vet yesterday unless you discussed this particular problem with the
vet at the time of the visit.

W

catface
July 15th 06, 05:00 AM
Wendy wrote:
> "catface" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
> >
> > paramont wrote:
> >> . He uses his litter box and then goes
> >> > on a rampage depositing a little in different spots...
> >>
> >> My 12 year Maine Coon cat seemed to be doing this after he had Calissa
> >> Virus (FCV). He was too sick to groom himself properly (sores from the
> >> virus on his mouth) so he was getting matted around his rear end, then
> >> fecal matter was sticking to his matted fur. Then as he walked around
> >> the house bits would fall off. He wasn't doing it on purpose. Have
> >> you checked your cat after he comes out of the litter box - is his rear
> >> end clean? Have you actually caught him squatting and relieving
> >> himself
> >
> > Thank you paramont. Oscar actually "digs", squats and relieves himself.
> > Which is why he likes sheets and laundry, to dig in. He's not in pain,
> > his stools are normally formed and sometimes he scuttles to his box
> > when I shout. So I know its not a medical problem. I have to pick him
> > up when I see him poised over something and carry him , protesting and
> > kicking, to the litter box.
> >
>
> You don't know it's not a medical problem. Cats are very good at hiding
> their pain. Instead they do obnoxious things to get our attention so we take
> them to the vet. It is not normal for a 9 yr old cat to change behavior
> suddenly. The easiest place to start solving the problem is to have him
> checked out. I wouldn't be particularly impressed even if the cat had been
> at the vet yesterday unless you discussed this particular problem with the
> vet at the time of the visit.
>
> W

Thank you for your advice. I too figured that the painful constipation
gave him negative feelings about the litter box. If I'm around when he
needs to go I do confine him to the bathroom. But it still doesn't
explain why he does the job normally sometimes and on other days breaks
out like this.
By the way he has no trouble urinating in the box. It's the stools
that he deposits in favourite places. He has had a urinary problem,
some kind of blockage when he was quite a young cat, when it hurt him
to go. He used to cry and only manage a few drops. Since that was
cured, he's been okay, drinks water and pees normally. Also I did speak
to my vet who keeps saying he's fine, only a little plump.
Small animal practice in Bombay where I'm from is mostly confined to
dogs. Few people keep cats. In some houses they just feed the feral
ones that drop in . So I've found most vets here haven't much
experience with cats. I've had the best tips from a lady who runs a cat
shelter (herbs and natural cures). She too feels it's a behavioural
problem, a bad habit that grew because somehow it worked for him the
first few times. I will give the vet one more shot though, but I don't
want him unnecessarily drugged. because as far as I can see, he eats
very well, drinks water, has normal, regular, bowel movements and isn't
in any distress. But he's a complicated fellow(I've had cats all my
life but he's different.)Maybe he needs to be psychoanalyzed!

Catlover Medway via CatKB.com
July 15th 06, 10:39 PM
A couple of useful links...

http://wizz-catz.co.uk/soiling.html
http://www.fabcats.org/spraying.html
http://www.apbc.org.uk/article10.htm

But I'd reiterate the importance of a vet check.

catface wrote:
>My nine year old shorthair, Oscar who used to be very easy to manage
>has suddenly developed this bad habit of eliminating all over the
>house, even on laundry and beds. He uses his litter box and then goes
>on a rampage depositing a little in different spots, unless I lock him
>in the bathroom. (where his box is).And I can't be around to catch him
>every time. He started this when he had a constipation problem, but he
>doesn't have any difficulty now. It's not even very consistent. There
>are days when he uses the litterbox and doesn't misbehave. I'm at my
>wits end. Is it a bid for attention?

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Starstruckchaos via CatKB.com
July 15th 06, 11:04 PM
It could very well be a medical problem. I'd definitely take him to a vet
and have a checkup at least. As far as the squatting and all - you are doing
what I would know to do - carry him to the litterbox. Is he going in the same
spots all the time? If he goes on the floor in the same spot, try moving his
box to there. Sometimes cats have a way of retaliating for attention when
they're upset. Maybe he's stressed and upset. Has anything gone on that may
have bothered him? I heard once that if you have a male cat and he sprays a
lot, sometimes neutering fixes that problem. I'd still definitely take him to
a vet to find out for sure what the problem is.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com