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Mark G.
July 18th 06, 05:20 AM
There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

-L.
July 18th 06, 06:40 AM
Mark G. wrote:
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

Yes. And during the day, too.

-L.

Ryan Robbins
July 18th 06, 09:06 AM
"Mark G." > wrote in message
...
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

You should always keep your cats inside, unless they are on a leash. Are
people ever going to learn this?

Alison
July 18th 06, 12:06 PM
"Mark G." > wrote in message
...
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?>>

I believe that in certain circumctances cats should be allowed out and
this is not one of them! They are in danger from coyoyes too.
Build a run or leash walk them.
Alison





>
>

angel
July 18th 06, 12:43 PM
Mark G. wrote:
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

cats don't have any natural enemies
(is why we got so many)

Kraut
July 18th 06, 01:14 PM
>> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
>cats don't have any natural enemies
>(is why we got so many)

They may not have any natural enemies but to a hungry bird of prey a
of any sort a kitten is an easy meal.

OF COURSE YOU SHOULD KEEP THEM IN AS LONG AS IT IS AROUND!!!

Common sense man!!!

Rhonda
July 18th 06, 02:30 PM
Oh man, those juveniles are huge!

Your cats are not safe with an eagle around.

Rhonda

Mark G. wrote:
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
>

dgk
July 18th 06, 02:45 PM
On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 08:06:39 GMT, "Ryan Robbins"
> wrote:

>"Mark G." > wrote in message
...
>> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
>You should always keep your cats inside, unless they are on a leash. Are
>people ever going to learn this?
>

I let them out into my small fenced in backyard when I'm home. There
is some risk that some giant bird will carry one off or an outside cat
will excite them, and a bigger risk that they'll get some stupid bird
or critter of some kind. They do try to get the local oppossum, and
managed to get some baby oppossums a few weeks back but I rescued
them. There is some small risk that they can get out; Nipsy did that
twice a few weeks back and I expanded the fence where he got over and
he can't get out there now. He was trying to get a bird in a tree.

When the back door is open during the nice weather, they spend all
their time outside. What does that tell you about where they would
rather be? Sure I can keep them inside all the time, but the small
risk of some incident is more than offset by the enjoyment they get
lying in (and chewing) the grass or hiding in the bushes, or chasing
each other around the yard. I have a cement wall, about four feet
high, at the back of the yard. Most of the time it's in the shade.
They lie in the shade on that wall for hours, watching birds fly by,
then they jump down and stalk some worms, and eat a bug.

If you can let your cats out safely, then do so.

July 18th 06, 03:15 PM
In article >,
"Mark G." > wrote:

> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

While driving a truck down an San Jose, California street one day at
about 35 MPH, a large raptor unexpectedly flew from left to right
directly in front of my windshield. The bird was weighed down by an
animal it held in its talons; it was desperately trying to gain
altitude.

I swear, it was a scene right out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie. I almost
hit the bird. Its prey was limp and pretty certainly dead. The prey was
about the size of an average adult cat (maybe on the small side), but I
didn't get a clear enough look to say for sure what it was.

The bird wasn't as large as a full-grown eagle, but it was big enough to
shake me up. Had I collided with it at that speed, I'm pretty sure it
would have broken my windshield.

Without knowing for sure, I would guess that the bird had picked up some
roadkill for dinner. I doubt whether that bird could have killed a cat
that size easily, if at all. Even so, I now consider it a fact that
small pets-- especially juveniles like puppies and kittens-- could be
taken by any raptor of sufficient size and temperament.

cybercat
July 18th 06, 05:14 PM
"Mark G." > wrote in message
...
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
>

No, asshole, I think you should roast your imaginary kitties and serve them
up on a platter. Nice headers. lol

cybercat
July 18th 06, 05:16 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Mark G. wrote:
> > There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> > in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
> Yes. And during the day, too.
>
> -L.
>

:) The boys of summer are back. Sadly, many of them are in their 50s.

"Uh, my cat is attracted to the woodchipper and keeps trying to jump in. Do
you think I should keep her away from it?"

This seems like the latest inept strategy to upset cat folks.

SOMEBODY needs a new hobby.

July 18th 06, 06:09 PM
wrote:
> In article >,
> "Mark G." > wrote:
>
> > There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> > in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
> While driving a truck down an San Jose, California street one day at
> about 35 MPH, a large raptor unexpectedly flew from left to right
> directly in front of my windshield. The bird was weighed down by an
> animal it held in its talons; it was desperately trying to gain
> altitude.
>
> I swear, it was a scene right out of an Alfred Hitchcock movie. I almost
> hit the bird. Its prey was limp and pretty certainly dead. The prey was
> about the size of an average adult cat (maybe on the small side), but I
> didn't get a clear enough look to say for sure what it was.
>
> The bird wasn't as large as a full-grown eagle, but it was big enough to
> shake me up. Had I collided with it at that speed, I'm pretty sure it
> would have broken my windshield.
>
> Without knowing for sure, I would guess that the bird had picked up some
> roadkill for dinner. I doubt whether that bird could have killed a cat
> that size easily, if at all. Even so, I now consider it a fact that
> small pets-- especially juveniles like puppies and kittens-- could be
> taken by any raptor of sufficient size and temperament.

A Great Horned Owl can take down cats and an eagle can take down the
GHO. Eagles, some, prefer fish but other eagles can certainly take cats
and small dogs. The eagles are easier to spot. A golden eagle is huge.
And their talons will go right through anything they grab. The owls are
quite treacherous and you really don't hear them coming until it's too
late. Amazing, deadly birds. And extremely good night vision.

The female golden eagle can weigh as much as many a full grown cat.
This is a bird you do not want to annoy. And its wing span can get over
7 feet and when it dives, it can go past 100 mph. Just imagine if
someone dropped a 12 pound ball from the roof of a tall building on top
of you. Well, the eagle pulls out of its dive or stoop before it hits
you but still, that's a mean wallop.

Ryan Robbins
July 19th 06, 03:43 AM
"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Mark G. wrote:
>> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>
> cats don't have any natural enemies
> (is why we got so many)

Oh, my. Let's see, the fisher, coyotes, maybe even bobcat and lynx...

Mark G.
July 19th 06, 03:45 AM
"cybercat" > wrote to 127.0.0.1:
>
> No, asshole

July 19th 06, 04:49 AM
"Ryan Robbins" > wrote:

>
>"angel" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>>
>> Mark G. wrote:
>>> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>>> in our back yard. Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?
>>
>> cats don't have any natural enemies
>> (is why we got so many)
>
>Oh, my. Let's see, the fisher, coyotes, maybe even bobcat and lynx...
>

Technically I don't think they are natural enemies because domestic
felines are not native to North America.

Easy pickings for predators however.

-mhd

Ryan Robbins
July 19th 06, 05:04 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>
> When the back door is open during the nice weather, they spend all
> their time outside. What does that tell you about where they would
> rather be?

I'm sure they wouldn't mind napping in the middle of the road, either. But
that doesn't mean it would be wise to allow them to do so.

>I have a cement wall, about four feet
> high, at the back of the yard. Most of the time it's in the shade.
> They lie in the shade on that wall for hours, watching birds fly by,
> then they jump down and stalk some worms, and eat a bug.
>
> If you can let your cats out safely, then do so.

I have yet to see situation in which a cat can be safely allowed outdoors
without a leash or cage.

Ann
July 19th 06, 05:10 AM
On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 04:04:46 +0000, Ryan Robbins wrote:

>
> "dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> When the back door is open during the nice weather, they spend all
>> their time outside. What does that tell you about where they would
>> rather be?
>
> I'm sure they wouldn't mind napping in the middle of the road, either. But
> that doesn't mean it would be wise to allow them to do so.
>
>>I have a cement wall, about four feet
>> high, at the back of the yard. Most of the time it's in the shade.
>> They lie in the shade on that wall for hours, watching birds fly by,
>> then they jump down and stalk some worms, and eat a bug.
>>
>> If you can let your cats out safely, then do so.
>
> I have yet to see situation in which a cat can be safely allowed outdoors
> without a leash or cage.

With the provision that a human is at the other end of the leash. They
enacted a leash law in a nearby city and there was soon an article in
the paper about a kitten left on a leash tied to a lawn chair that had
gotten tangled and strangled.

IBen Getiner
July 19th 06, 10:04 AM
Mark G. wrote:
> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> in our back yard.

It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
if they think there's a free meal to be had though.

> Should I keep the kitties inside tonight?

The big adult eagles with a nest nearby are the ones you need fear.. I
saw an adult bald eagle carrying off a largemouth bass while I was out
fishing once that I know went three pounds. They had a nest about half
a mile away with a couple of young to feed. They wouldn't hesitate, nor
would they discriminate I've got to believe. Nor should they...


IBen

Matthew
July 19th 06, 10:53 AM
"IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Mark G. wrote:
>> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>> in our back yard.
>
> It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
> since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
> ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
> million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
> if they think there's a free meal to be had though.


You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass

Rhonda
July 19th 06, 02:37 PM
Matthew wrote:
> "IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>
>>Mark G. wrote:
>>
>>>There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>>>in our back yard.
>>
>>It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
>>since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
>>ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
>>million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
>>if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
>
>
> You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
> trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass

Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...

Rhonda

July 19th 06, 07:14 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> Matthew wrote:
> > "IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> >
> >>Mark G. wrote:
> >>
> >>>There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> >>>in our back yard.
> >>
> >>It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
> >>since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
> >>ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
> >>million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
> >>if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
> >
> >
> > You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
> > trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass
>
> Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...
>
> Rhonda

A young eagle just finally evicted from the parents' area might be a
tad immature and staying a little more visible and lower than mature
eagles do. And being confused and immature, this young eagle might not
know enough to refrain from attacking a puddy cat. Or he might get too
hungry. Since cats are also predators, other predators with experience
might forego a cat meal since the meal can fight back. Depends on the
surprise and the attack. How big the cat is and how strong and able to
defend with its own claws if not killed immediately by the talons of
the eagle.

Now that said, where are you that they hang out in trees? And are they
high up in the trees or lower like regular predators, owls and hawks?

Are you in a forest or some place with lots of eagles? I only heard
locally of one eagle couple hanging out in a tree and one needed a
scope to see clearly. It was pretty high up. Unfortunately I don't
think there are many eagles in the eastern USA anymore. I just read
20,000 !!!!!! of them were killed because the farmers thought they ate
the sheep back in the 1950's. By 1963 they were protected but by then
it was too late in the east.

Mark G.
July 20th 06, 03:25 AM
"Matthew" > wrote to 127.0.0.1:
>
> You are a complete moron . . .where the **** do you think they live up
> your ass

Mark G.
July 20th 06, 03:33 AM
> wrote:
>
> Now that said, where are you that they hang out in trees?

Seattle, just north of Green Lake. Bald eagles are fairly common
around here. I have seen mature eagles hunting ducklings on the
lake at the foot of my street. And eagles periodically fly over our
neighborhood with flocks of angry crows and starlings pursuing
them.

> high up in the trees or lower like regular predators, owls and hawks?

This is the first time I have seen one in our tree (about 60' up.)
I viewed it through the binoculars and it was definitely a juvenile bald
eagle. It sat about 18" tall from head to tail feathers, and I got a good
look at its face. Unfortunately I do not have an SLR with a telephoto
so the pictures I took aren't worth posting.

I kept the kitties inside for the rest of the evening.

-Mark

Rhonda
July 20th 06, 04:09 AM
wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:

>>Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...

> Since cats are also predators, other predators with experience
> might forego a cat meal since the meal can fight back. Depends on the
> surprise and the attack. How big the cat is and how strong and able to
> defend with its own claws if not killed immediately by the talons of
> the eagle.

Yep, most prey is killed on impact. The force of the blow squishing them
to the ground at the very least breaks their backs, whether or not they
can be picked up afterwards.

> Now that said, where are you that they hang out in trees? And are they
> high up in the trees or lower like regular predators, owls and hawks?

Near Seattle. One was cruising over McDonald's a mile from here last
year, but I did not see where it landed. Also saw one at a park near
here about halfway up a tree. About 2-3 hours north of Seattle is a
river where many Alaska eagles winter. I've seen them stacked 4-5 to a
tree at various levels. There are postcards from that area of many more
in one tree.

In Alaska, I saw a juvenile fly out of the lower branches of a tree.
That was amazing -- it had a huge wingspan. The adults there were mainly
perched at the top of evergreen trees.

> Are you in a forest or some place with lots of eagles? I only heard
> locally of one eagle couple hanging out in a tree and one needed a
> scope to see clearly. It was pretty high up. Unfortunately I don't
> think there are many eagles in the eastern USA anymore. I just read
> 20,000 !!!!!! of them were killed because the farmers thought they ate
> the sheep back in the 1950's. By 1963 they were protected but by then
> it was too late in the east.

I think they are making a comeback around here. I even saw one that was
hit by a car on the interstate in Bellevue. That was sad, they're such
beautiful birds, even though I don't agree with their meal choices.

Rhonda

IBen Getiner
July 20th 06, 04:41 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> Matthew wrote:
> > "IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> >
> >>Mark G. wrote:
> >>
> >>>There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> >>>in our back yard.
> >>
> >>It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
> >>since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
> >>ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
> >>million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
> >>if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
> >
> >
> > You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
> > trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass
>
> Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...
>
> Rhonda


They nest in trees, Rhoda (and even then only in live ones). And
yes... sometimes we might expect to find one resting on a branch. But
they do not 'hang out' in trees. Any pictures that you might produce
for the sake of this discussion will most likely be forgeries on your
part. So don't even waste your time. I'm an old Southern boy and I
know what eagles do and what the don't do. I've studied the same two
mating pairs upon their annual return going on eight years now, and I
know what I'm talking about. So you can just put a sock on it. If you
find that difficult, just pretend it's a cucumber. I'm quite sure you
know the drill...


IBen

IBen Getiner
July 20th 06, 04:47 AM
Matthew wrote:
> "IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > Mark G. wrote:
> >> There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> >> in our back yard.
> >
> > It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
> > since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
> > ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
> > million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
> > if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
>
>
> You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
> trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass

I do not deal with terrorists, Matty


IBen Getiner

Charlie Wilkes
July 20th 06, 04:55 AM
On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 19:33:00 -0700, "Mark G."
> wrote:

> wrote:
>>
>> Now that said, where are you that they hang out in trees?
>
>Seattle, just north of Green Lake. Bald eagles are fairly common
>around here. I have seen mature eagles hunting ducklings on the
>lake at the foot of my street. And eagles periodically fly over our
>neighborhood with flocks of angry crows and starlings pursuing
>them.
>
>> high up in the trees or lower like regular predators, owls and hawks?
>
>This is the first time I have seen one in our tree (about 60' up.)
>I viewed it through the binoculars and it was definitely a juvenile bald
>eagle. It sat about 18" tall from head to tail feathers, and I got a good
>look at its face. Unfortunately I do not have an SLR with a telephoto
>so the pictures I took aren't worth posting.
>
>I kept the kitties inside for the rest of the evening.
>
>-Mark
>
It's a genuine risk, although it doesn't happen often. I live in the
San Juans, and I have talked to people who have credible, eyewitness
accounts of cats being attacked by eagles and (more frequently) great
horned owls. Ordinarily the cat will fend off the attack, but not
without injury.

As for eagles not perching in trees, that is ridiculous.

Charlie

Rhonda
July 20th 06, 05:46 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>Matthew wrote:
>>
>>>"IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Mark G. wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
>>>>>in our back yard.
>>>>
>>>>It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
>>>>since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
>>>>ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
>>>>million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
>>>>if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
>>>
>>>
>>>You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
>>>trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass
>>
>>Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...
>>
>>Rhonda
>
>
>
> They nest in trees, Rhoda (and even then only in live ones). And
> yes... sometimes we might expect to find one resting on a branch. But
> they do not 'hang out' in trees. Any pictures that you might produce
> for the sake of this discussion will most likely be forgeries on your
> part. So don't even waste your time. I'm an old Southern boy and I
> know what eagles do and what the don't do. I've studied the same two
> mating pairs upon their annual return going on eight years now, and I
> know what I'm talking about. So you can just put a sock on it. If you
> find that difficult, just pretend it's a cucumber. I'm quite sure you
> know the drill...
>
>
> IBen
>

Gotta love ya, Iben. You try so hard.

Tootles,

Rhonda

Mark G.
July 20th 06, 06:44 AM
"IBen Getiner" > wrote:
>
> Any pictures that you might produce
> for the sake of this discussion will most likely be forgeries on your
> part. So don't even waste your time.

And any posts that you might produce for the sake of this
discussions will most likely be trolls on your part.

Matthew
July 20th 06, 09:44 AM
"IBen Getiner" >

<sniped for being stupid>

And I don't deal with morons and people who want to sleep with Brandy

Good bye asshole

<PLONK>

July 20th 06, 12:29 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> I think they are making a comeback around here. I even saw one that was
> hit by a car on the interstate in Bellevue. That was sad, they're such
> beautiful birds, even though I don't agree with their meal choices.
>
> Rhonda

I thought the bald eagle is also known as a sea eagle and their
preferred food choices are really fish. Although who knows, maybe they
forgot to read the bird textbooks. The slightly larger golden eagle
[the one without the white head and has feathered feet] can attack
substantial game. They mate for life which is pretty impressive,
compared to many humans :) One eagle chases the food to exhaustion and
the other golden eagle comes in for the kill.

John Ross Mc Master
July 20th 06, 05:29 PM
On 20 Jul 2006 04:29:16 -0700, "
> wrote:

>
>Rhonda wrote:
>> I think they are making a comeback around here. I even saw one that was
>> hit by a car on the interstate in Bellevue. That was sad, they're such
>> beautiful birds, even though I don't agree with their meal choices.
>>
>> Rhonda
>
>I thought the bald eagle is also known as a sea eagle and their
>preferred food choices are really fish. Although who knows, maybe they
>forgot to read the bird textbooks. The slightly larger golden eagle
>[the one without the white head and has feathered feet] can attack
>substantial game. They mate for life which is pretty impressive,
>compared to many humans :) One eagle chases the food to exhaustion and
>the other golden eagle comes in for the kill.

I live in the Fraser Valley. Bald eagles are a pest here. The eagle is
an opportunistic scavenger for the most part. They only hunt when no
rotting fish are lying on riverbanks. They do attack cats and rabbits
a bit more inland.

22brix
July 20th 06, 05:39 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...

> I thought the bald eagle is also known as a sea eagle and their
> preferred food choices are really fish.

In the Channel Islands off the coast of California, there's an effort to
trap and relocate golden eagles due to their predation of native foxes and
restore bald eagles to the area. The golden eagles have almost wiped out
these foxes. Bald eagles tend to prey on fish more than other critters and
they frequently scavenge and steal from other birds but I still wouldn't
trust them to leave a cat alone!!

Bonnie

IBen Getiner
July 21st 06, 07:44 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > Rhonda wrote:
> >
> >>Matthew wrote:
> >>
> >>>"IBen Getiner" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>Mark G. wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>>>There is a juvenile bald eagle hanging out in the tree
> >>>>>in our back yard.
> >>>>
> >>>>It's probably a hawk or a falcon and you just think it's an eagle,
> >>>>since eagles do not "hang out" in trees. They prefer instead to hang
> >>>>ten a couple of hundred feet up and let their eyes (which are about a
> >>>>million times better than yours) do the work. Hawks will hang in a tree
> >>>>if they think there's a free meal to be had though.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>You are a complete moron If you believe that "Eagles don't hang out in
> >>>trees" where the **** do you think they live up your ass
> >>
> >>Eagles hang out in trees. I have lots of pictures...
> >>
> >>Rhonda
> >
> >
> >
> > They nest in trees, Rhoda (and even then only in live ones). And
> > yes... sometimes we might expect to find one resting on a branch. But
> > they do not 'hang out' in trees. Any pictures that you might produce
> > for the sake of this discussion will most likely be forgeries on your
> > part. So don't even waste your time. I'm an old Southern boy and I
> > know what eagles do and what the don't do. I've studied the same two
> > mating pairs upon their annual return going on eight years now, and I
> > know what I'm talking about. So you can just put a sock on it. If you
> > find that difficult, just pretend it's a cucumber. I'm quite sure you
> > know the drill...
> >
> >
> > IBen
> >
>
> Gotta love ya, Iben. You try so hard.
>
> Tootles,
>
> Rhonda

You're no effort at all, Honda..
Now, why don't you go off and find a nice tree to hang out in...


IBen

IBen Getiner
July 21st 06, 07:47 AM
Matthew wrote:
> "IBen Getiner" >
>
> <sniped for being stupid>
>
> And I don't deal with morons and people who want to sleep with Brandy
>
> Good bye asshole
>
> <PLONK>

Anytime, Matty. You may self-implode when ready.


IBen

Hee..Hee.. Heeeee...!!

http://www.sensesofcinema.com/images/26/cteq/yellow_submarine.jpg

IBen Getiner
July 21st 06, 07:49 AM
John Ross Mc Master wrote:
> On 20 Jul 2006 04:29:16 -0700, "
> > wrote:
>
> >
> >Rhonda wrote:
> >> I think they are making a comeback around here. I even saw one that was
> >> hit by a car on the interstate in Bellevue. That was sad, they're such
> >> beautiful birds, even though I don't agree with their meal choices.
> >>
> >> Rhonda
> >
> >I thought the bald eagle is also known as a sea eagle and their
> >preferred food choices are really fish. Although who knows, maybe they
> >forgot to read the bird textbooks. The slightly larger golden eagle
> >[the one without the white head and has feathered feet] can attack
> >substantial game. They mate for life which is pretty impressive,
> >compared to many humans :) One eagle chases the food to exhaustion and
> >the other golden eagle comes in for the kill.
>
> I live in the Fraser Valley. Bald eagles are a pest here. The eagle is
> an opportunistic scavenger for the most part. They only hunt when no
> rotting fish are lying on riverbanks. They do attack cats and rabbits
> a bit more inland.

You are an un-American swine, sir. I'll bet you have a poster of the
burning Pentagon on your bedroom ceiling... Scavenger indeed..

IBen Getiner



http://www.sensesofcinema.com/images/26/cteq/yellow_submarine.jpg